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9

I'll take a slightly different stance here - having a vehicle stand for a year or a little longer than that isn't that long, so I'd try to get it running first before I start changing out parts. Here's what I'd do: Drain the carbs if it's not FI. Chances are that the fuel has evaporated and left some residue. If you didn't drain the carbs it might be ...


8

On a car with fuel injection there can be two fuel pumps, one high-pressure and one low-pressure. The low-pressure pump moves the gas from the tank up to the high pressure pump. The high pressure pump then raises the pressure to a level that will be useful to the injectors. The two PIDs reflect those two different systems. PID Description Min ...


8

I recommend to everyone I know to run your generator or other small equipment dry before storage. The main purpose of this is to get all of the ethanol based fuel out of carburetor and fuel bowl. Ethanol has a propensity of gumming things up and can leave a lot of varnish over time. This tends to plug orifices needed for proper fuel metering while running, ...


7

To expand on xpda's answer, and genericise it for any engine that has been standing for some time: Drain and replace the fuel - modern unleaded goes off after a couple of months so won't be any good if it has been standing for longer than that. Replace/clean the fuel filter. Drain and refill the oil. If it has been standing for a long time it would be ...


7

I'll preface this with the caveat that I haven't replaced the fuel filter on this specific vehicle before, and my advice is based on experience with other cars. I do think it's good advice regardless. I agree that you should not crimp the lines, but I strongly disagree that you should just disconnect it without depressurizing the lines. Remove the fuse for ...


6

Those are metric screw dimensions. M10 means a 10 millimeter outer diameter for the bolt or whatever piece it is; M12 means 12 millimeters. The part after the 'x' is the pitch -- how many threads there are per some unit of length. To figure out which you have, you can measure the existing part with calipers and a thread gauge. You might also try calling ...


5

Hyundai/Kia are known for having issues with their EVAP control systems. I owned a 2007 Hyundai Tiburon and the EVAP solenoid was malfunctioning. It made a pretty strong fuel smell because of the leak it caused. Cold weather can cause some of the rubber hose and emissions tubing to harden and crack under stress. Another thing to keep in mind is that when ...


5

I fixed a 1998 Ford Contour that wouldn't start after sitting for a while in cold weather. The problem was a corroded ground connector in the wiring at the fuel pump. A couple years later, it was left sitting again, and sure enough, it wouldn't start. Same problem, same fix. It can happen, though I'm not sure I would have believed it if I hadn't seen it ...


5

Pinhole leaks in the low-pressure lines from the tank to the pump can cause this - the pump sucks in air through the hole instead of fuel from the tank. Check the condition of all the fuel lines, and the connections between rubber flexis and solid lines. Check any seals on the filter for the same reason.


4

If there were contaminants in the gas, it could gum up the carb, so it might be worthwhile to drain the gas and refill with new gas. At a minimum, drain a little gas from the lowest point you can find in the fuel system. Check the battery and make sure it is charged. Check the fluids, brakes, lights, tire pressure, and oil level.


4

The fuel pump combined with the fuel pressure regulator should take care of any air in the lines. If you don't like the idea of cranking the car continuously until it starts (it would take 3 cycles or so), then turn the key into the "on" position without cranking it. This causes the fuel pump to run, because it primes the fuel system in anticipation of ...


4

By the time you need a fuel filter change it is time to replace the hoses also. Simply cut the hose off the fuel line and replace it using new clamps. When you get you filter ask the person at the counter for a foot of high pressure fuel hose. There was a time when they actually included the hose section and clamps in the box with the filter.


4

"Why can't people just upgrade fuel pumps and increase fuel line (pipe?) pressures to force fuel to flow in to the engine when the intake valves are open instead?" This is the job of the fuel injector/ECU. It is timed specifically so the proper amount of fuel is injected at the correct time. The ECU is tuned for a specific fuel pressure and can typically ...


4

My theory is you have a stuck float in your carburetor. This is causing the fuel bowl not to fill completely. When you go around the corner, the main jets are without fuel (sucking air) and this kills engine power. Getting the carb rebuilt (or at least looked at) will probably solve the issue. You may also try using a plastic handled screwdriver and using ...


3

In multi port fuel injection the injectors are located near the Intake valve. In central port fuel injection there is a single injector with multiple valves that route to their respective cylinders. Think the 90's Chevy Blazer with the 4.3l Vortec. There is also throttle body fuel injection in which a single injector is located at the throttle plate. As ...


3

(Too late to help the OP, but for future searchers:) Aero people use United-Erie "EZ Turn Fuel Lube" (SAE or Mil Spec "G-6032D"). It isn't officially a sealant, so the clamps are still doing the work. But it is fuel resistant, thus forms a non-hardening layer between the metal and rubber parts, and you won't have to rip or distort the hoses from cranking ...


3

The problem turned out to be a leaking seal in the injection pump. I came across this video which explains how to replace the leaky seals relatively easily and far less expensively than replacing the injection pump (which is what the dealership does).


3

Do not crimp the fuel line. As long as you put a rag under the filter, you won't even notice the spray. While the rail may be held at a fairly high pressure, the line is small, so there isn't much fuel in there to escape. On top of that, the fuel line will depressurize into the bottom of the filter and drip down, so you won't have to worry about fuel ...


2

Generally speaking (not familiar with that model), it could be due to: Bad fuel pump (fairly rare, fuel pumps are one thing that usually last forever) Clogged fuel filter (has it been changed recently/ever?) Bad fuel pressure regulator (although, they usually fail the opposite way) Leaking fuel injectors (unlikely, would require a pump that's marginal to ...


2

Could be a possible air leak. This affects your mixture, and would likely be the cause of the problem. Have you tried replacing/tightening the clamps on the hose?


2

Two questions, since you checked your spark plugs for spark... Can you get to your fuel rail on top of your head? If so, can you disconnected? I ask, because the "poor man's" way of checking the fuel pump is to disconnect the fuel rail and see fuel coming as soon as you turn the ignition to the accessory position. Listening for the pump can be difficult ...


2

There isn't any kind of application you can apply to the hose to make it easier to take off at a later time. The reasoning is it would be too easy for the hose to slip off during normal operation. And by the time you replace the fuel filter again it wouldn't even be there anymore as it's not a regular maintenance object. Just doing what you did (Twisting ...


2

On a four cycle (four stroke) engine with sequential port fuel injection, the fuel injectors fire at 1/2 the rate of the RPM (ie: 3000 rpm engine speed equates to 1500 injector pulses per minute), which just happens to be the same speed at which the spark plug for a single cylinder fires. Four factors allow the injector to operate at this speed. The first ...


2

If the bubbles are in the fuel line that leads to the high pressure pump, then air in the system would reduce the pumps ability to pressurise the fuel correctly. Diesel injectors require high pressure fuel in order to achieve proper atomisation; liquids don't burn, so the fuel needs to enter the cylinder in very fine droplets in order for a clean burn to ...


2

Your carb is plugged, probably due to ethanol gas. It is heck on these small engines. The easiest way to fix this is to replace the carb. The crud from the ethanol gets into the very small orifices and clogs them up. There is enough of a draw from the vacuum created under full choke for it to draw gas and keep it running, but once you take the choke off, the ...


2

Sometimes A float gets "waterlogged" (so saturated with fuel that it just won't float anymore.) The float could be bent in position. Worn tip on float needle Worn o-ring in the float seat Excess dirt and varnish in the carburetor. (Varnish deposits occur when fuel sits too long..) The best thing to do is remove and examine the carburetor. Take it ...


2

The second page you provided says: NiCopp® has been used on hydraulic/fluid transfer systems on vehicles where steel lines and tubing are commonly used. This includes brake, fuel and transmission systems. There should be absolutely no issue using the NiCopp lines for fuel. As for compression fittings, remember that the flared fittings shown on the ...


2

Kind of a long shot, but I had this problem with an old Nova, turning right. That was due to loose screws in the carb. It might have been the mounts to the intake manifold; but, my vague memory is of tightening screws on the topside. It was a long time ago.


1

As you doubted the trouble was with the float. I would like you to remove the bottom cup of the carburettor and remove the fuel and gently blow some air to the float and to the jet. Make sure not to disturb the Air or Fuel Screw. If you disturb it, it will be the difficult task to tune it back to normal by you. Now gently tap the float and make it free. ...


1

Most carburetor fuel systems do not have a return fuel line. If they do it is usually at the fuel pump and would not impact your air/fuel mixture in any way. However your thinking is correct when applied to fuel injected systems, where a blockage in the return line would raise fuel pressure, thus enriching the mixture. As HandyHowie suggested, some ...



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