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4

I fixed a 1998 Ford Contour that wouldn't start after sitting for a while in cold weather. The problem was a corroded ground connector in the wiring at the fuel pump. A couple years later, it was left sitting again, and sure enough, it wouldn't start. Same problem, same fix. It can happen, though I'm not sure I would have believed it if I hadn't seen it ...


4

Pinhole leaks in the low-pressure lines from the tank to the pump can cause this - the pump sucks in air through the hole instead of fuel from the tank. Check the condition of all the fuel lines, and the connections between rubber flexis and solid lines. Check any seals on the filter for the same reason.


4

I'll take a slightly different stance here - having a vehicle stand for a year or a little longer than that isn't that long, so I'd try to get it running first before I start changing out parts. Here's what I'd do: Drain the carbs if it's not FI. Chances are that the fuel has evaporated and left some residue. If you didn't drain the carbs it might be ...


4

To expand on xpda's answer, and genericise it for any engine that has been standing for some time: Drain and replace the fuel - modern unleaded goes off after a couple of months so won't be any good if it has been standing for longer than that. Replace/clean the fuel filter. Drain and refill the oil. If it has been standing for a long time it would be ...


4

The fuel pump combined with the fuel pressure regulator should take care of any air in the lines. If you don't like the idea of cranking the car continuously until it starts (it would take 3 cycles or so), then turn the key into the "on" position without cranking it. This causes the fuel pump to run, because it primes the fuel system in anticipation of ...


3

By the time you need a fuel filter change it is time to replace the hoses also. Simply cut the hose off the fuel line and replace it using new clamps. When you get you filter ask the person at the counter for a foot of high pressure fuel hose. There was a time when they actually included the hose section and clamps in the box with the filter.


3

I recommend to everyone I know to run your generator or other small equipment dry before storage. The main purpose of this is to get all of the ethanol based fuel out of carburetor and fuel bowl. Ethanol has a propensity of gumming things up and can leave a lot of varnish over time. This tends to plug orifices needed for proper fuel metering while running, ...


2

There isn't any kind of application you can apply to the hose to make it easier to take off at a later time. The reasoning is it would be too easy for the hose to slip off during normal operation. And by the time you replace the fuel filter again it wouldn't even be there anymore as it's not a regular maintenance object. Just doing what you did (Twisting ...


2

If there were contaminants in the gas, it could gum up the carb, so it might be worthwhile to drain the gas and refill with new gas. At a minimum, drain a little gas from the lowest point you can find in the fuel system. Check the battery and make sure it is charged. Check the fluids, brakes, lights, tire pressure, and oil level.


2

Generally speaking (not familiar with that model), it could be due to: Bad fuel pump (fairly rare, fuel pumps are one thing that usually last forever) Clogged fuel filter (has it been changed recently/ever?) Bad fuel pressure regulator (although, they usually fail the opposite way) Leaking fuel injectors (unlikely, would require a pump that's marginal to ...


2

Two questions, since you checked your spark plugs for spark... Can you get to your fuel rail on top of your head? If so, can you disconnected? I ask, because the "poor man's" way of checking the fuel pump is to disconnect the fuel rail and see fuel coming as soon as you turn the ignition to the accessory position. Listening for the pump can be difficult ...


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The problem turned out to be a leaking seal in the injection pump. I came across this video which explains how to replace the leaky seals relatively easily and far less expensively than replacing the injection pump (which is what the dealership does).


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It's more likely to be the relay than the fuel pump. And the run-on of the fuel pump is much more likely to be heard after cranking, rather than just when ignition is enabled. You don't want the fuel pump to be running if the engine isn't turning over as that creates a fire hazard should you be in a crash. I know of several cars configured like this and the ...



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