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"Why can't people just upgrade fuel pumps and increase fuel line (pipe?) pressures to force fuel to flow in to the engine when the intake valves are open instead?" This is the job of the fuel injector/ECU. It is timed specifically so the proper amount of fuel is injected at the correct time. The ECU is tuned for a specific fuel pressure and can typically ...


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In multi port fuel injection the injectors are located near the Intake valve. In central port fuel injection there is a single injector with multiple valves that route to their respective cylinders. Think the 90's Chevy Blazer with the 4.3l Vortec. There is also throttle body fuel injection in which a single injector is located at the throttle plate. As ...


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On a car with fuel injection there can be two fuel pumps, one high-pressure and one low-pressure. The low-pressure pump moves the gas from the tank up to the high pressure pump. The high pressure pump then raises the pressure to a level that will be useful to the injectors. The two PIDs reflect those two different systems. PID Description Min ...


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Check; 1 - Battery voltage is ok 2 - ignition voltage comes to the spark plugs (remove one of the s.plug caps and hold it close to a metal surface on the engine and ask your friend to crank the engine to see if spark exist) If there is no spark, refer to the car manual (ignition system wiring drawings) to see related fuse/relay/diodes. 3 - pressurized ...


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The temperature engine rises because the ignition of the fuel is slower. It takes longer for the fuel to burn because there is less of it. The fuel itself has the same amount of BTUs available by burning it whether you use extra oxygen or not. PERIOD. When you blow on the coals in your fire, they get hotter but burn faster. They release the same amount of ...


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I think the answers are incorrect. Because the question assumption is incorrect. First we have to decide hotter compared to what? and also we need to know this is a fact, is it really hotter or is it a myth? in addition the amount of the fuel/oxygen ratio is important, is this condition always true for all lean ratios? Perhaps the correct question is why the ...


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You have a qualitative description of what happens, but let's break it down to a smaller scale. When we talk about "temperature" of something, we are really talking about how fast the molecules are moving around and bouncing off each other. "Temperature" is really "kinetic energy". And it turns out that there are other types of energy besides moving around ...


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If you have ever seen an oxy-acetylene torch being used, you will have noticed that before the oxygen is turned on, the torch has a bright yellow flame. This is the fuel burning in a less than ideal amount of oxygen. The flame is relatively cool and it produces a lot of soot. When the oxygen is turned on, tthe flame turns blue and becomes hot enough to ...


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Funny you should ask this Max :) First lets make sure of our definition. Running an engine lean means changing the air / fuel ratio to have more air than is ideal (14.7:1 air to fuel). In my reading there are two effects. First, the fuel is an atomized liquid which has a cooling effect on the combustion chamber. So less fuel, less cooling effect. Second, ...


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It's a demand vs supply deal The fuel pumps found in most OEM fuel delivery setups today are driven by an electric motor that is running at a fixed speed. This effectively fixes the flow rate provided by the fuel pump. The majority of fuel-delivery systems found in fuel-injected vehicles are return-style. What this means is that the fuel injectors will ...


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Background You asked Why is the effect of a bad fuel pump more noticeable at higher speeds? I assume that by 'higher speeds' you mean engine speeds or RPM's. During high RPM operation an ICE consumes more fuel so the flow rate into the fuel injection system or carburetor increases at higher RPM's. This taxes the fuel system and puts more load on the ...



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