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I live in Canada and I can tell you the wear on starting an engine is greater than idling for a few minutes, guaranteed, especially since here in the winter it can only take 20-30 minutes for your engine to drop from full operating temp down to room temperature if it isn't running, and cold starting an engine means less viscous oil in the crankcase as well ...


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Disconnect your battery to reset your ECU. It won't hurt, and is probably the cheapest and easiest thing you can try. 30 minutes is usually enough. There are other theories as to why your mileage went down, but I think you're on the right track thinking the ECU hasn't learned to use the new data correctly. I am thinking that because your new 02 sensor is ...


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Cyclists know the answer to this only too well... They use the maximum pressure the tyre will allow, when racing or time-trialing (say 140 psi) But the ride is so bumpy. When training they let their tyres down to 80-90 psi for the comfort, and better road-holding, at the expense of more effort required. (i.e. a worse mpg.)


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Paulster2's comment on your post is absolutely correct. The difference between diesel and petrol is so huge, it completely overshadows the differences between cars in various regions. That said, there is historical precedence for different typical power/fuel consumption figures in these regions. The US has long had very cheap fuel, cheap land and extensive ...


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Look in this Car and Driver article from March of this year. You'll notice what the number one mileage car on the road today is (other than hybrids/electric) ... That's right, an AMERICAN Chevrolet Cruze at 46mpg (or ~20km/l). This beats out Japanese and European cars alike. You'll notice the Cruze has a 2l diesel engine, like the "average European" car you ...


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I don't know what that specific button does, but I can tell you what similar buttons in other cars do: they retard your throttle response so that your car feels more sluggish. This means that when you step on the gas, it does not cause the throttle to open quite as much, making your drive smoother and more fuel efficient. Conversely, a "sport" button would ...


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The ECON button is not a placebo, though the wording from that specific web page is a bit vague. The key is that the ECON button and the Eco-Assist system are two separate things. According to Honda, pressing the ECON button configures your car to improve mileage at the cost of performance. Turning it off will improve power and reduce mileage, which you ...


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As @LynnCrumbling stated, this would be hard to put a number on, mainly because it depends on too many factors. This is what I can tell you. When O2 sensors get old, they don't necessarily go bad, what they do is get lazy. When a good O2 sensor is doing its thing, if you were to look at the readings from it, the numbers go all over the place, from top of the ...


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I doubt you're going to be able to have someone put a number on this. I'm betting you also know that just because no error was thrown, it doesn't mean that the sensor isn't impacting performance. Lifehacker notes that replacing them could improve mileage "up to 15%." As @BobCross mentioned, "most people wouldn't consider it worth their time to do the ...


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OK, I have no knowledge of this specific vehicle. However, assuming faults fixed, the following I have found do work (on many vehicles over 40 years): Friction reducers in the oil. PTFE ones gives about 10% improvement; takes a few 1,000 miles to coat the engine internals. Brands: Greased Lightning, Slick 50. Note: as losses in the engine drop, you get ...


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I was also having a similar sort of question few months back, I have a diesel car and I am from India where diesel costs to 1$ [around 62 rs ] per litre. I made few changes to my habbit of driving, dont overspeed the vehicle, drive at proper RPM, switch off the car where you are about to stop more than a minute, especially at signals and traffic jams. ...


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Other common thing that causes high fuel consumption is imperfect work of brake system. Brake pistons and pads should travel freely... Just take your lifting jack and rotate the wheels right after applying brake: wheel should be fully released with no delay. UPD I suppose every sticking brake caliper adds 1 liter per 100 km.


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Where you drive your car has a significant impact on the fuel economy. If you drive mostly on highways and other roads with high speed limits and no stop signs or stop lights you will have a high fuel economy, while if you mostly engage in "city driving", that is, roads with lots of stop signs, stop lights, and heavy traffic, you will have a lower fuel ...



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