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6

You should not notice any difference. Here's why: 1 hp = 746 W. This means that 60 W is 0.08 hp. The worst possible scenario from a load perspective is at idle. Assuming the engine is outputting a measly 5 hp at idle, the extra load would work out to 1.6 % of this value. The change in fuel consumption is barely sensible.


5

Yes, gear ratios are the second largest influence on your fuel consumption. Number one being maladjusted timing. I always relay the story of my and my wife's cars: she has a 1.4 Opel Corsa and I have a 2.0 Turbo Coupe. While my car has more than twice the power of hers and weighs 350kg more, we get about the same consumption figures (she gets 12.5km/l and I ...


3

I think your example is running pretty good, but may be a tad on the rich side. Nothing much to worry about. If it were running a tad bit leaner, the plug would have more of an tan/ash color to it. When reading the plug, don't pay as much attention to the bit at the top of the threads. This area is prone to have some minor carbon build up no matter how well ...


3

I think you are right on track. Taking a look a Fuelly there are 5 other Altezza owners and they all seem to be getting about the same MPG as you do: http://www.fuelly.com/car/toyota/altezza


3

How much worse is the fuel usage you are experiencing? Have you talked to any other owners to see if you are getting way below their mileage? How did your last car perform compared to listed fuel mileage ratings? In the U.S., the government posts the results of required fuel mileage tests. Most of the people I have talked to do not get the same fuel mileage ...


2

Great question. I am making an educated guess here, so don't quote me in court;) Because piggyback chips interfere with your car's various inputs I would assume that you are correct and that your MPG score will be inaccurate as a result. I can't say by how much though. These chips usually give an MPG boost of around 10%, so I would imagine your true MPG ...


2

As you are traveling on flat land and transition to an uphill slope, whether you (the driver) realizes it or not, you must press the accelerator down further in order to maintain speed (or engine RPM). The vehicle control systems recognizes this and pushes more fuel into the system to compensate. This gives you more power to make it up the hill. If the grade ...


2

Really what you need to do is learn how to "read" a spark plug. We can tell you what spark plug to use for a stock engine, but once you start modifying the engine, all bets are off. I will explain what reading is and how you, too, can do this at home. As for the spark plug itself, the base spark plug which Denso says is model W14EX-U11. We can from there ...


2

Yes, you can install it, but no, won't do anything for fuel consumption. Carburetors don't automatically adjust themselves to take advantage of new fuel characteristics or other changes in the engine's combustion characteristics. Nano fuel economizer does the same job that your engine oil does. So, if you regular put new oil in your car, you're already ...


2

There are no charts that I am aware of, but you can calculate the theoretical maximum efficiency by considering the following": the RPM current speed assume a volumetric efficiency of 100% Assume an ideal air/fuel mixture of 14.7/1 (for petrol engines) the weight of the car assume the car is traveling on a 100% level surface total volume of cylinders ...


1

Two things: First, you could get skinnier tires on there, but I wouldn't. You won't gain any mileage from doing so. You'll incur the cost of tires, so will cost you more in the process. Second, putting taller tires on there to increase your rolling radius will hamper improved fuel mileage. The reason is because taller tires require more torque to run the ...


1

I think you can't use a single average value for all cars. Here are some variables that could greatly influence your program : Gear engaged (The same acceleration won't use the same amount of fuel) Type of fuel (petrol, diesel) Car characteristics (weight, aerodynamysn)


1

If you're going for performance, copper plugs are your best bet. Just know that they don't last nearly as long as platinum or iridium plugs. As far as brand goes, it doesn't REALLY matter, but my personal preference is Bosch simply because Bosch built most of my car's engine management and ignition system anyway. But the other brands you mention are just as ...


1

I'm not really familiar with your car, specifically, but I'm ready to speculate based on general knowledge of fuel injection. Electronic Fuel Injection or EFI uses 'closed loop air/fuel ratio control'. What this means is that it has a way to 'see' how completely the oxygen has been used up by the fuel delivered. If there's too much fuel, there will be no ...


1

Apparently there's one more thing you can check to see if you're engine is consuming too much, and that is the composition of the exhaust gas. I took my engine to a dyno before swapping it for a 2JZ ('cuz hey, if I'm gonna the 2JZ mileage anyways, might as well get power) and they told me the engine was getting more fuel than it should. Apparently the ...


1

You are correct - in a modern fuel-injected vehicle, the ECU will cut the fuel right back (or even off completely) if you are coasting downhill in gear, wheras more fuel is needed to maintain an idle.



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