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10

In a word: No. To add more to it: Absolutely Not. There is one huge thing which you have not taken into account. That being carbon which deposits from the air/fuel mixture burning process. Where does it go? Right into the oil (among other places). A small amount of blow by occurs which also forces this mixture down into the crank case. Now you have it in ...


8

You are driving a Saturn S-Series (My car for the last 8 years, which I am very happy to have.) You should definitely have much higher fuel economy. (19.6mpg is what you have. 33+mpg is easily achieved.) I would hardly be surprised if it is the ECTS (engine coolant temperature sensor.) These plastic temperature gauges fail with about 100% certainty. This ...


7

The most common causes (aside from poor driving habits) are bad timing bad sparkplugs low octane fuel* malfunctioning coolant temperature sensor blocked catalytic converter(s) malfunctioning MAP/MAF sensors driving with the parking brake engaged** having aftermarket wings on the car. tyres not inflated to the recommended pressure and a few others I can't ...


6

You should not notice any difference. Here's why: 1 hp = 746 W. This means that 60 W is 0.08 hp. The worst possible scenario from a load perspective is at idle. Assuming the engine is outputting a measly 5 hp at idle, the extra load would work out to 1.6 % of this value. The change in fuel consumption is barely sensible.


5

I doubt you're going to be able to have someone put a number on this. I'm betting you also know that just because no error was thrown, it doesn't mean that the sensor isn't impacting performance. Lifehacker notes that replacing them could improve mileage "up to 15%." As @BobCross mentioned, "most people wouldn't consider it worth their time to do the ...


4

I think your example is running pretty good, but may be a tad on the rich side. Nothing much to worry about. If it were running a tad bit leaner, the plug would have more of an tan/ash color to it. When reading the plug, don't pay as much attention to the bit at the top of the threads. This area is prone to have some minor carbon build up no matter how well ...


4

Recommended values give you the handling and tire wear that the manufacturer intends for the vehicle. If you increase above that, the contact patch decreases, giving better gas mileage, but you start sacrificing handling and causing abnormal tire wear.


4

I think you need to do a throttle position sensor recalibration (reset). (NOTE: I will post several different adjustment versions. I believe the top one is what you need (for a K8 engine), but will include another four depending on your engine.) To do this for your vehicle you need to follow the steps below, depending on whether it is a stick/auto and ...


4

As @LynnCrumbling stated, this would be hard to put a number on, mainly because it depends on too many factors. This is what I can tell you. When O2 sensors get old, they don't necessarily go bad, what they do is get lazy. When a good O2 sensor is doing its thing, if you were to look at the readings from it, the numbers go all over the place, from top of the ...


3

The ECON button is not a placebo, though the wording from that specific web page is a bit vague. The key is that the ECON button and the Eco-Assist system are two separate things. According to Honda, pressing the ECON button configures your car to improve mileage at the cost of performance. Turning it off will improve power and reduce mileage, which you ...


3

Lots of things influence fuel consumption, actual pedal position being probably the strongest. The engine's rotational speed has SOME influence, but not nearly as much as pedal position... and a lot of the reason that the engine's speed has influence is because ignition timing will be different at different engine speeds (among other secondary influences), ...


3

Your logic is way off. You should change your oil and filter at the manufacturers recommended intervals, with an oil of the manufacturers specification. The manufacturers cover many many miles under many differant conditions to decide a specification and in most circumstances the specification cannot be bettered for the intended use of the vehicle.


3

Yes, a reset could work, if the problem is that the ECU is used to the previous driver's driving style and his style was vastly different to your's. But it could also just be the way you drive. Do you drive more like Morgan Freeman or Vin Diesel? These cars are quite heavy on the juice in city driving. With mine, I get about 7.5l/100km on the highway going ...


3

Really what you need to do is learn how to "read" a spark plug. We can tell you what spark plug to use for a stock engine, but once you start modifying the engine, all bets are off. I will explain what reading is and how you, too, can do this at home. As for the spark plug itself, the base spark plug which Denso says is model W14EX-U11. We can from there ...


3

Paulster2's comment on your post is absolutely correct. The difference between diesel and petrol is so huge, it completely overshadows the differences between cars in various regions. That said, there is historical precedence for different typical power/fuel consumption figures in these regions. The US has long had very cheap fuel, cheap land and extensive ...


3

Disconnect your battery to reset your ECU. It won't hurt, and is probably the cheapest and easiest thing you can try. 30 minutes is usually enough. There are other theories as to why your mileage went down, but I think you're on the right track thinking the ECU hasn't learned to use the new data correctly. I am thinking that because your new 02 sensor is ...


2

As you are traveling on flat land and transition to an uphill slope, whether you (the driver) realizes it or not, you must press the accelerator down further in order to maintain speed (or engine RPM). The vehicle control systems recognizes this and pushes more fuel into the system to compensate. This gives you more power to make it up the hill. If the grade ...


2

Yes, you can install it, but no, won't do anything for fuel consumption. Carburetors don't automatically adjust themselves to take advantage of new fuel characteristics or other changes in the engine's combustion characteristics. Nano fuel economizer does the same job that your engine oil does. So, if you regular put new oil in your car, you're already ...


2

There are no charts that I am aware of, but you can calculate the theoretical maximum efficiency by considering the following": the RPM current speed assume a volumetric efficiency of 100% Assume an ideal air/fuel mixture of 14.7/1 (for petrol engines) the weight of the car assume the car is traveling on a 100% level surface total volume of cylinders ...


2

You don't want them to service it "perfectly"; it'd be prohibitively expensive, much more expensive than the scooter's replacement value. Sure, you'd have a nearly essentially brand-new scooter... but it'd still have some of the weaknesses of age and torture. Metal does fatigue over time, especially if it's subjected to rough use (you mentioned poor road ...


2

Where you drive your car has a significant impact on the fuel economy. If you drive mostly on highways and other roads with high speed limits and no stop signs or stop lights you will have a high fuel economy, while if you mostly engage in "city driving", that is, roads with lots of stop signs, stop lights, and heavy traffic, you will have a lower fuel ...


2

Other common thing that causes high fuel consumption is imperfect work of brake system. Brake pistons and pads should travel freely... Just take your lifting jack and rotate the wheels right after applying brake: wheel should be fully released with no delay. UPD I suppose every sticking brake caliper adds 1 liter per 100 km.


1

The vehicles engine map will be the differance. If you are using a throttle body spec for a differant set up then it is bound to be wrong. The TPS may also vary on model to model.


1

Cyclists know the answer to this only too well... They use the maximum pressure the tyre will allow, when racing or time-trialing (say 140 psi) But the ride is so bumpy. When training they let their tyres down to 80-90 psi for the comfort, and better road-holding, at the expense of more effort required. (i.e. a worse mpg.)


1

When you turn your steering wheel, even ever so slightly: as the tyres turn the tread on the tyre 'shuffles'. The more your tread shuffles, the greater the tyre wear. The manufactures recommended pressures will give you the optimum performance and wear from your tyres. Under inflation allows the edges of the tyres to take all the load and shuffle-increasing ...


1

I’ve heard folks claim mileage gains by running their tire pressure above the manufacturer’s recommendations. In theory, that makes sense: With more inflation pressure, the tire bulges in the center of the tread and creates a smaller, skinnier contact patch with the road. This should mean less rolling resistance and increased mileage. we know under-inflated ...


1

When your tyre pressure is lower,there is more rubber in contact with the road, so your engine has to work a little harder to keep you moving forward.


1

I don't see it helping any. The long term fuel trims on modern cars will adapt to conditions within 15 minutes of driving, and even those only have a minor impact. The short term fuel trims that have the most impact adapt pretty much instantly (hence the "short term"). All that said, resetting the ECU is easy, so feel free to go for it and let us know ...


1

You might expect about 19.6 km/l (all things perfect, maximum efficiency), but 14.5 km/l highway to 11.5 km/l (city) is realistic if fuel/ignition/engine are in excellent condition and the tires are correctly inflated; those numbers are original factory spec. There are physical limits to the efficiency one might expect from any given car due to weight, wind ...


1

Petrol consumption is the sum of many factors which in day to day driving do not concern the driver. The greatest fuel consumption figures are obtained when the highest gear possible is used, with the minimum of throttle to maintain vehicle speed or desired acceleration. Consider the new Jeep fitted with a nine speed transmission. What this works out to is ...



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