Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

You are driving a Saturn S-Series (My car for the last 8 years, which I am very happy to have.) You should definitely have much higher fuel economy. (19.6mpg is what you have. 33+mpg is easily achieved.) I would hardly be surprised if it is the ECTS (engine coolant temperature sensor.) These plastic temperature gauges fail with about 100% certainty. This ...


6

The most common causes (aside from poor driving habits) are bad timing bad sparkplugs low octane fuel* malfunctioning coolant temperature sensor blocked catalytic converter(s) malfunctioning MAP/MAF sensors driving with the parking brake engaged** having aftermarket wings on the car. tyres not inflated to the recommended pressure and a few others I can't ...


4

As @LynnCrumbling stated, this would be hard to put a number on, mainly because it depends on too many factors. This is what I can tell you. When O2 sensors get old, they don't necessarily go bad, what they do is get lazy. When a good O2 sensor is doing its thing, if you were to look at the readings from it, the numbers go all over the place, from top of the ...


4

I doubt you're going to be able to have someone put a number on this. I'm betting you also know that just because no error was thrown, it doesn't mean that the sensor isn't impacting performance. Lifehacker notes that replacing them could improve mileage "up to 15%." Paulster's previous note regarding MAP & MAF is still relevant, since they are also ...


2

Other common thing that causes high fuel consumption is imperfect work of brake system. Brake pistons and pads should travel freely... Just take your lifting jack and rotate the wheels right after applying brake: wheel should be fully released with no delay. UPD I suppose every sticking brake caliper adds 1 liter per 100 km.


2

Where you drive your car has a significant impact on the fuel economy. If you drive mostly on highways and other roads with high speed limits and no stop signs or stop lights you will have a high fuel economy, while if you mostly engage in "city driving", that is, roads with lots of stop signs, stop lights, and heavy traffic, you will have a lower fuel ...


1

OK, I have no knowledge of this specific vehicle. However, assuming faults fixed, the following I have found do work (on many vehicles over 40 years): Friction reducers in the oil. PTFE ones gives about 10% improvement; takes a few 1,000 miles to coat the engine internals. Brands: Greased Lightning, Slick 50. Note: as losses in the engine drop, you get ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible