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5

If you are at least slightly handy with tools (or have a nice friend who is) then it probably wouldn't be too hard to remove the tank c/w pump from the car and take it inside to the warmth and let it defrost in the bath tub and maybe even run some warm water over it. This may fix the tank and pump, but line is harder. Possibly fill tank with winter fluid ...


5

Unfortunately I think this is simply a consequence of living in colder climates. The only long term solution to this problem would be to somehow seal off the locking cylinder from condensation and the elements, which would be nearly impossible to do if the only method of unlocking the door is by physically inserting and turning a key. A word of advice for ...


5

I'm guessing water in the latch mechanism somewhere. Try displacing the water (when it's above freezing) with some WD-40, let it sit awhile, then lubing with a silicone based lube (not sure if that's the best option, but it's what comes to mind, would like to see other opinions on the best latch lube).


4

I have a Focus 2010 model and can confirm that Bobs advise is absolutely right. The same thing happened to me this evening when my passenger door when opened wouldn't latch in again (currently outside temp minus 5c). Just 10 seconds using a hair drier on the latch solved the problem for me. I also then sprayed the mechanism with WD40 for good measure. Had ...


4

It if was freezing outside, it was almost certainly colder inside the latch mechanism. It sounds like ice formed on the spring and / or the latch hinge. You were able to use the leverage of the door handle to move the latch against the friction of the ice but then the spring wasn't able to push it back. When something like this happens, I would suggest ...


4

Hyundai/Kia are known for having issues with their EVAP control systems. I owned a 2007 Hyundai Tiburon and the EVAP solenoid was malfunctioning. It made a pretty strong fuel smell because of the leak it caused. Cold weather can cause some of the rubber hose and emissions tubing to harden and crack under stress. Another thing to keep in mind is that when ...


3

You can apply car wax to the top/side weatherstrip - frost won't stick to wax. I don't like the fact that it automatically energizes the window, though; I've seen an awful lot of window bottom weatherstrips destroyed when heavily frosted windows were rolled down further than about 1/8". You live in a climate very similar to my own, too. You may be forced to ...


3

Charge the battery. It will be totally dead, unless you have it on a trickle charger. You may need to buy a new one if the current one doesn't hold a charge well, but this will at least allow you to start the car. While the battery is charging, check all fluids. Coolant, transmission fluid, brake fluid, and even the windshield washer fluid (while you're ...


3

As already mentioned - no permanent damage is expected. Leave your car in a warm parking lot (underground or heated) for a couple of hours. Summer fluid will melt and you could safely use sprays to drain it from connecting pipes.


2

I've had 1999 RAV4 and I left it with summer washer fluid couple years ago. Then I refilled it with winter fluid like you did. The damage I got is a rear spray didn't work, because I got a hole in the hose that connects spray thing to the main reservoir(most likely because of expansion of fluid in the hose). So, when I tried to wash my back window, all of ...


2

Doesn't seem to cause any damage, at least on my cars. My washer fluid freezes inside the system every Winter and I've yet to have any problem (one car is 21 years old and the other is 17) with the washer system (even accidently trying to use it a few times each Winter when I forget that it's frozen).


2

LOL - I literally just dealt with exactly the same problem too. What I did is stick a roof heating wire inside the tank and plug it into a wall outlet for 12 hours. Another solution from a friend was to boil water and continuously pour it in the tank until the ice is melted, then normally drain all the water using the pump to spray it all out and then fill ...


2

Put some WD-40 onto a rag and wipe the seal area with it. The "WD" stands for water displacement. When applied, it will keep the moisture off of the seal so there will be nothing there to freeze to the window.


1

In my particular case, the cause seemed to be low oil and an oil weight too heavy for the temperature. I only checked the oil level so late because my low oil light never came on, so the oil must have been low enough to cause pressure drop, but not so low as to trip the oil level sensor. Also, I see reports online of 10W oil being too heavy for temps ...


1

In Upstate New York, we have 4 Seasons Winter, Winter, Winter, and Summer. Silicon rubber dressing WORKS (such as Armor All!!!!), it is thick, use poly cloth to apply sparingly to weather strip where door and window freezes. Do 3 or 4 times a season.


1

Please bear in mind that this is risky and you may not want to do it with an expensive car, or without a fire extinguisher handy. When my cooling system froze, I jacked up the front a bit, took a butane camping stove and put it under the engine, and left it lit for a few minutes. Solved the problem in a hurry, but I'd already ruined the water pump the first ...



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