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1

The car has not been driving long. As the others have said, the water comes from the combustion of the fuel. When the exhaust system is cold, it cools the exhaust enough that the water can condense. After a while of operation, the exhaust system heats up. The same water vapor is present in the exhaust, but it stays vapor and doesn't drip.


1

Every gallon of fuel your vehicle burns produces a gallon of water out of the exhaust. If the weather is cold you will see it as steam. If the rear of the exhaust system is still cold even in warm weather it will be for a short time after start-up, you will see the drips. On a hot engine/exhaust you will not see any drips from the tail-pipe. If there are ...


11

It signifies that the car is running absolutely correct. Here is the reason why: A gasoline (petrol) molecule is made up as such: C8H18 (or 8 Carbon atoms and 18 Hydrogen atoms) Energy is obtained from the combustion of it by the conversion of a hydrocarbon to carbon dioxide and water. The combustion of octane follows this reaction: 2 C8H18 + 25 O2 → ...


1

Looking at the description of the California O2 sensor for your car, the only thing different on it (besides the internals) is the electrical plug. The wrench which you tighten it down with is 7/8", which means the sensor bung should be the same size as well. I don't think there is any real external difference between the California and non-California ...


0

Doubt if my two cents is asked for but rust is oxidization. It's just burning reall slow. Torch with a brazing or welding tip is best. The rust disdappears like majic when you burn it the rest of the way up. I find no need for red hottin' it. Cast iron is brittle. Get a 650 degree heat stick and warm things evenly and cool slow coveted all ...



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