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6

It has very little to do with the exhaust system and much to do with the mechanics of the engine. All modern muscle cars have aluminium blocks (vs cast iron), round exhaust ports (vs rectangle), and completely different timing set ups than 60s cars have. The firing order makes a big difference because nobody fires 2 in a row on the same side of the engine ...


6

Under normal use (non-performance type use), the valves, both intake and exhaust, should last the life of the engine. If and when they do leak, it will not take long for the valve to become a burnt valve. In your case, I doubt they were leaking prior to pulling everything apart. If the exhaust valves had leaked, they would have been fried. If valves do not ...


5

If you don't want to weld, you can use a joint like this: NOTE: The above image is for demonstration purposes only. I couldn't readily find one which was 2" on each side. The only difference is, the inside diameter on both ends would be 2". Your outside diameter 2" pipes would fit inside. Use two muffler clamps to attach. You'll need to match the outside ...


5

You shouldn't need to use sealant on the gaskets. Most exhaust manifold gaskets either come with their own sealant (like Fel-Pro's do with the silver looking stuff), or they are metal and don't require it either. I believe sealants (such as high temp Permatex Copper) will just burn off anyway, because the heat at the head/header interface is far beyond what ...


4

Q1: Is that a reason to worry or replace them, provided that they don't actually malfunction? The only reason you'd want to replace stock manifolds is if they are cracked (or broken) or if you want to do a performance upgrade. Q2: Do exhaust manifolds have a propensity to rust faster than other parts and why? Yes. The reason is because of the ...


4

With the check engine light on, the car is going to be running a fixed set of parameters from the Engine Control Module. For instance Fuel Pressure will be held at max pressure and timing and spark adjustments (if done electronically) will not retard or advance. One of the reasons this happens is because the Engine Control Module is not recieving all of ...


4

Two stroke engines, by their very nature, require some of the 'plumbing' you note in your question. Specifically the expansion chamber. Unlike 4-stroke engines, two-stroke engines require the expansion chamber and stinger (reduced diameter over distance) at the end of pipe. The energy in the exhaust wave expands and wave front slows in the expansion ...


3

You may be able to get close to what you want by installing a stainless steel exhaust (as opposed to the standard mild steel). It will give you a more raspy sound. In addition, deleting the center resonator/muffler and adding a freeflowing sports rear box with a large tip (diameter should be larger than the diameter of the pipe coming from the cat) would ...


3

Exhausts inside the car is not healthy at all. As someone said, perhaps another mechanic should be considered. As to the problem, it sounds like the exhaust pipe is leaking before the catalytic converter. The engine light would likely light up because of this, since the Lambda (Oxygen) sensor in the converter would be receiving less exhausts (and more ...


3

If the catalytic convertor is truly plugged, you wouldn't be able to drive the vehicle, so this makes me wonder about the voracity of your statement. With a plugged cat, the back pressure created behind it will only let you rev the engine to around 1500-2000 rpm. I had to replace a set of heads on a pick-up truck for a guy because he continued to run the ...


3

Also, remember that MAF is a reading of the amount of air entering the engine. If you have a backflow issues (high backpressure) or even a timing issue where the valves are not opening and closing at the correct time (slack chains, jumped timing), your MAF sensor readings will reflect this as well. I know this post is late, but any who are looking into this ...


3

DTC P0420 - Catalyst system efficiency below threshold (bank-1) DTC P0457 - Evaporative emission control system leak detected (fuel cap loose/off) First let's look at the P0420 causes include: Exhaust leak Catalytic converter Rear O2 sensor circuit The computer compares the pre- and post-cat O2 sensors readings to determine if the cat is working ...


2

Is it normal to attach a catalytic converter using u-bolts? Or when i replace it should I have it welded? It is not normal to utilize u-bolts (muffler clamps) on catalytic converters. They are most often welded in place.


2

By removing the baffles you have reduced the amount of restriction and backpressure. This has the effect of making the engine run lean. If you get the carbs tuned so that it's running properly, it should run as well as it did before you performed the baffle-ectamy. With a free-er flowing exhaust it may even run better. But that's only if the original ...


2

Check out Red Rooster Racing. They're bangalore based and do make performance exhausts for Royal Enfield bikes. Call them up


2

The Mini has an unusual set up on its oil filter element. If you look at the filter you will see one end has a rubber sealing on it, whilst the other end does not. When you fit the filter element, the rubber ended end must be on the outside, away from the engine and into the cap you take off to replace the element. If you dont know it, it is easy to think ...


2

I would never ignore a worn tie rod; you could be driving down the road, hit a serious bump, and suddenly lose your ability to steer in a straight line, or worse. If you have the the tie rod replaced, I doubt that any reputable mechanic would tackle that without also repairing the power steering rack. I personally would never ignore any kind of steering ...


2

From my experience as a LR Defender owner (known for chassis rusting): Rust, once there, can spread. It will not go away. So if you just take it out on sunny days you will not be making it get any better. Sometime or other you will need to get to grips with this rust problem. From what can be seen in the pictures, the muffler seems OK. That's a good start, ...


2

Instead of trying to replace it the way you are suggesting, why not do it a little easier with a V-Flange split coupler. Something like this: (NOTE: This is just an example from Summit Racing You can find them on eBay all day long.) Each side of the split would fit, one on the cat and one on the exhaust pipe. You'd need to weld these in place. They seal ...


1

Should I just remove the pipes going into the manifold and just tap a bolt into the manifold? That is an option, though you really don't want a bolt sticking into the path of the hot exhaust gases if you're after maximizing performance. I'd prefer brazing or welding the manifold shut. Does it matter what I plug the holes with? No, as long as it ...


1

You can add a free flow exhaust to your system ,Since your bike is carbeuratted, if you have not upjetted your carb to accommodate the increased airflow I bet your engine is running lean that is, more air less fuel. This can seriously damage the engine. To cut costs you can remove the silencer from the cylinder , remove the catalytic converter and ...


1

The cat is the incorrect part for your vehicle. You are looking for the Federal ones, which are 49 state compliant. Catalytic Converter: MagnaFlow Part #24064 (Fits GT, so you may want to check with MagnaFlow to ensure it will work with your engine ... check if your engine is a 1ZZFE motor.) Cat Back Muffler: MagnaFlow Part #15812 is correct for your ...


1

This is a very subjective question in what do you mean by noticeable? It also depends on the size of the resonator itself. The general answer would be, no, it won't. Most mufflers have fiberglass matting in them which absorbs the sound which flows into the muffler. The dents usually won't affect this. The only time it would is if the muffler is completely ...


1

Considering that you have a single cylinder pushing out exhaust into dual pipes, you wouldn't need to worry so much about equalization efforts. By its very nature, the exhaust is going to find the path of least resistance and therefor will flow to which side it can flow through easier until things are equalized. It appears from what I've seen that the Yezdi ...


1

Vise grips not an option? Crank them down pretty tight, and it should turn.


1

You have two separate issues here. First, you have what I would think is leaking valve seals. When you slow down, there is a great amount of vacuum build up inside the intake track. With leaking valve seals, this will pull oil past them and down into the intake track. This gets pulled into your engine when you speed back up and causes the blue smoke. ...


1

Weld a bigger nut on top of the stripped bolt, then slip a long metal pipe over an appropriate-sized wrench and try again. Soaking it overnight in some WD-40 will also help. Also try sharp taps with a hammer to "break" the rust.


1

Soaking in WD-40 or equivalent will help, but the real final measure is first a blowtorch - even a cheap and not-very-powerful one will do - followed by impact wrench. Alternatively, you can buy hydraulic tools but they will probably snap the bolt leaving you with one more problem to solve.



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