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20

It signifies that the car is running absolutely correct. Here is the reason why: A gasoline (petrol) molecule is made up as such: C8H18 (or 8 Carbon atoms and 18 Hydrogen atoms) Energy is obtained from the combustion of it by the conversion of a hydrocarbon to carbon dioxide and water. The combustion of octane follows this reaction: 2 C8H18 + 25 O2 → ...


6

It has very little to do with the exhaust system and much to do with the mechanics of the engine. All modern muscle cars have aluminium blocks (vs cast iron), round exhaust ports (vs rectangle), and completely different timing set ups than 60s cars have. The firing order makes a big difference because nobody fires 2 in a row on the same side of the engine ...


4

With the check engine light on, the car is going to be running a fixed set of parameters from the Engine Control Module. For instance Fuel Pressure will be held at max pressure and timing and spark adjustments (if done electronically) will not retard or advance. One of the reasons this happens is because the Engine Control Module is not recieving all of ...


4

Every gallon of fuel your vehicle burns produces a gallon of water out of the exhaust. If the weather is cold you will see it as steam. If the rear of the exhaust system is still cold even in warm weather it will be for a short time after start-up, you will see the drips. On a hot engine/exhaust you will not see any drips from the tail-pipe. If there are ...


4

Two stroke engines, by their very nature, require some of the 'plumbing' you note in your question. Specifically the expansion chamber. Unlike 4-stroke engines, two-stroke engines require the expansion chamber and stinger (reduced diameter over distance) at the end of pipe. The energy in the exhaust wave expands and wave front slows in the expansion ...


3

Exhausts inside the car is not healthy at all. As someone said, perhaps another mechanic should be considered. As to the problem, it sounds like the exhaust pipe is leaking before the catalytic converter. The engine light would likely light up because of this, since the Lambda (Oxygen) sensor in the converter would be receiving less exhausts (and more ...


3

If the catalytic convertor is truly plugged, you wouldn't be able to drive the vehicle, so this makes me wonder about the voracity of your statement. With a plugged cat, the back pressure created behind it will only let you rev the engine to around 1500-2000 rpm. I had to replace a set of heads on a pick-up truck for a guy because he continued to run the ...


3

You may be able to get close to what you want by installing a stainless steel exhaust (as opposed to the standard mild steel). It will give you a more raspy sound. In addition, deleting the center resonator/muffler and adding a freeflowing sports rear box with a large tip (diameter should be larger than the diameter of the pipe coming from the cat) would ...


3

DTC P0420 - Catalyst system efficiency below threshold (bank-1) DTC P0457 - Evaporative emission control system leak detected (fuel cap loose/off) First let's look at the P0420 causes include: Exhaust leak Catalytic converter Rear O2 sensor circuit The computer compares the pre- and post-cat O2 sensors readings to determine if the cat is working ...


3

You can use a wrap and clamp to seal the hole. Your local parts store should have such a kit. Or the better solution would be to weld it shut, or cut out the section of pipe where the hole is, and weld in a new section of pipe to replace it.


3

I think you're looking for something approximately like this, only in the size you actually need: exhaust band clamp


3

The first thing to do is too take the EGR out of circuit. A quick and easy way to do this is to cut an old metal oil can(its thin enough for scissors) so you have a piece of the can that will fit between the bolts of the EGR. Tighten the EGR bolts up with the can acting as a gasket. Now try watching the MAF sensor voltage as you rev the engine sharply and ...


2

The car has not been driving long. As the others have said, the water comes from the combustion of the fuel. When the exhaust system is cold, it cools the exhaust enough that the water can condense. After a while of operation, the exhaust system heats up. The same water vapor is present in the exhaust, but it stays vapor and doesn't drip.


2

The only cars with turbocharges which do not have air filters are race cars. They do it this way so there is absolutely no restrictions on the intake tract. Race engines are routinely rebuilt as needed, so are not worried about small particulates entering the engine. Normal street driven vehicles will all have air filters on them, and as long as those air ...


2

Is it normal to attach a catalytic converter using u-bolts? Or when i replace it should I have it welded? It is not normal to utilize u-bolts (muffler clamps) on catalytic converters. They are most often welded in place.


2

Instead of trying to replace it the way you are suggesting, why not do it a little easier with a V-Flange split coupler. Something like this: (NOTE: This is just an example from Summit Racing You can find them on eBay all day long.) Each side of the split would fit, one on the cat and one on the exhaust pipe. You'd need to weld these in place. They seal ...


2

By removing the baffles you have reduced the amount of restriction and backpressure. This has the effect of making the engine run lean. If you get the carbs tuned so that it's running properly, it should run as well as it did before you performed the baffle-ectamy. With a free-er flowing exhaust it may even run better. But that's only if the original ...


2

Check out Red Rooster Racing. They're bangalore based and do make performance exhausts for Royal Enfield bikes. Call them up


1

Considering that you have a single cylinder pushing out exhaust into dual pipes, you wouldn't need to worry so much about equalization efforts. By its very nature, the exhaust is going to find the path of least resistance and therefor will flow to which side it can flow through easier until things are equalized. It appears from what I've seen that the Yezdi ...


1

Vise grips not an option? Crank them down pretty tight, and it should turn.


1

You have two separate issues here. First, you have what I would think is leaking valve seals. When you slow down, there is a great amount of vacuum build up inside the intake track. With leaking valve seals, this will pull oil past them and down into the intake track. This gets pulled into your engine when you speed back up and causes the blue smoke. ...


1

The Mini has an unusual set up on its oil filter element. If you look at the filter you will see one end has a rubber sealing on it, whilst the other end does not. When you fit the filter element, the rubber ended end must be on the outside, away from the engine and into the cap you take off to replace the element. If you dont know it, it is easy to think ...


1

Looking at the description of the California O2 sensor for your car, the only thing different on it (besides the internals) is the electrical plug. The wrench which you tighten it down with is 7/8", which means the sensor bung should be the same size as well. I don't think there is any real external difference between the California and non-California ...


1

Give your local motorcycle dealership a call. FMF does make replacement cores and these are very likely available from your local FMF dealer. This mfg part number will help you find what you're looking for: 040261 Confirm on their web page: http://www.fmfracing.com/Products/Accessories/334


1

Weld a bigger nut on top of the stripped bolt, then slip a long metal pipe over an appropriate-sized wrench and try again. Soaking it overnight in some WD-40 will also help. Also try sharp taps with a hammer to "break" the rust.


1

I have a 2005 Hyundai Elantra, and I was getting OBDII error codes: P2626 Hyundai - HO2S Pumping Current Trim Circuit/Open Bank 1 Sensor 1 .. and later, I also got P2196 Hyundai - HO2S Signal Stuck Rich Bank 1 Sensor 1 My car was sputtering, somewhat intermittently. It would intermittently lose power rather suddenly while accelerating. The egine was also ...


1

Soaking in WD-40 or equivalent will help, but the real final measure is first a blowtorch - even a cheap and not-very-powerful one will do - followed by impact wrench. Alternatively, you can buy hydraulic tools but they will probably snap the bolt leaving you with one more problem to solve.



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