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17

My general rule for exhaust bolts/nuts is to order new ones with the part you are replacing, knowing full well that there is a good chance you'll destroy the ones you are removing. Better to be prepared ahead of time than to be stuck waiting for new parts from another country after you've disassembled everything. Personally, I have a rule of ordering every ...


11

My first concern is that you have an exhaust leak. The exhaust is designed to exit at the rear and or side of the car, far away from your fresh air intake of the ventilation system in the cowl area. I would check for an exhaust leak starting at the front as you stated that it's coming in from through the ventilation system. This can be dangerous and should ...


11

It signifies that the car is running absolutely correct. Here is the reason why: A gasoline (petrol) molecule is made up as such: C8H18 (or 8 Carbon atoms and 18 Hydrogen atoms) Energy is obtained from the combustion of it by the conversion of a hydrocarbon to carbon dioxide and water. The combustion of octane follows this reaction: 2 C8H18 + 25 O2 → ...


9

Looks like part of the muffler to me. You should have it replaced it could end up obstructing the exhaust.


7

Yes, at least half of the exhaust is coming straight out of that gap without passing through the muffler. As you've noted, this leads to an increase in noise (or music, depending on your taste). To my eye, that looks like a hassle to fix on your own. There appears to be the rusted remnants of two bolts holding the Y-pipe to the passenger side muffler and ...


7

I used these kits occasionally when I was young and broke, so my knowledge isn't that current. Back then, they were good for a couple of months, maybe a little longer depending on how bad and where the hole is. If the exhaust pipe is so rusted it'll break in a few months, that kit is not going to last very long as the movement of the breaking pipe will ...


6

You should replace any gaskets that will be disturbed by replacing the pipes. Clean any old gasket material off the surface that the gasket sat on with a putty knife or something similar. You want a nice clean surface for the new gasket to seal against. After everything is reassembled start the engine and place your hand near the pipe joints to feel for ...


5

Basically you have an exhaust leak, it's dangerous (to you in the form of carbon monoxide) and should not be ignored. An easy way to check for the leak is to pull a vacuum line off the intake and suck a small amount (1 - 2oz) of transmission fluid into the intake via that vacuum line. Make sure the vehicle is outside, because it's going to smoke a lot. The ...


5

The cat back is just that the exhaust pipe including the muffler from the catalytic converter to the end of the tail pipe. Seems odd to me, not impossible just odd that you would need to replace the entire exhaust system from the cat back to pass inspection. I see from your profile that you are from PA and road salt can deteriorate an exhaust in that ...


5

If the cat rattles (may happen more after warmed up), then it's definitely bad. Banging on it can help see if there is material loose in there. If the cat was plugged up enough to affect performance, I would hope that one of the 02 sensors would kick off the check engine light. However, if it's borderline, I guess the engine may be able to adjust the fuel ...


5

The first thing to check for is an exhaust leak. If the exhaust is leaking some of it may be accumulating under the car instead of exiting out the back. This could be why you smell it on the side of the car when you get out. This could be dangerous if it is getting inside the car.


5

Performance exhaust pipes increase power by getting the exhaust gas out of the engine faster. It does this by eliminating the restiction by using larger pipes or less sound absorbing/reflecting material. An analogy is the aerator on the faucet it slows down the output or flow out of the pipe similar to a muffler. Gas mileage is improved by getting more of ...


5

You will likely be annoyingly loud but otherwise fine. As always, you are liable for your own compliance with local noise ordinances. I would recommend that you drive with the windows up until you give the car to the shop in order to avoid any risk of carbon monoxide poisoning. For example, don't drive with the trunk propped open: the low pressure behind ...


5

As @ Timo states they are a low budget repair.The fact that the sheet is aluminum and thin enough to wrap around the pipe will limit its' longevity. It may work ok for a hole, but won't support a broken pipe for long. How long it will last will vary. The closer to the engine and the catalytic converter the higher temp and the shorter the life. I would use it ...


5

Does it make the most sense to replace an old car's entire exhaust system all at once? Considering your car is almost 10 years old, having to replace all of the parts in the exhaust system does not sound unreasonable, especially if your locality uses any type of road solvent during the winter months (they didn't in Montana where I'm from originally, ...


4

From past experience, I've found that headerwrap (a company called Thermotec makes some nice stuff) is a lightweight alternative to replace heat shields.. HOWEVER..I've found that the wrap traps moisture. I had used this stuff on a set of headers and within 2 years (this is in the west coast mind you - no salt or snow), i had 2 primaries rust and ...


4

Should be able to remove the bolts as long as they don't hold anything to them. Even if there is something attached you can remove them to detach the rest of the shield and then reattach. Either way, removing your heat shield is not what you should focus on, but instead installing a new one. Your exhaust gets really hot and the shield is not just for ...


4

Yes but as of present there are no US based tuners that provide a DPF delete kit or engine tuning (reprogramming) to allow the safe removal of this device. They exist overseas in the UK and Europe but I would hold off until someone in the US provides a product specific to the US car. Also the US spec 335d uses a DEF (diesel exhaust fluid, adblue, urea ...


4

Golf TDis (and I'd imagine other VWs of that era) are notorious for the Turbos failing. It can be a very expensive fix once it goes properly, so I'd get it investigated asap. From your description, I'd surmise that oil is seeping through one of the seals into the turbo, then when you rev the engine and the turbo spools up, the oil that has accumulated at ...


4

Have a look at your owners manual if it states a maximum oil consumption. I don't think that 750ml over a whole oil change interval is a lot. My guess would be that it's more likely an issue with the turbo and investigating if it is shouldn't be that expensive. Essentially you or your mechanic would need to pull the pipes going from the turbo to the intake ...


4

How is your coolant level? If it was dropping slowly over time, that plus the white smoke might indicate a bad head gasket. A cracked head that only leaks when warm could be it, too. Does it smell like Antifreeze?


4

It is a fresh air snorkel. The purpose is to raise the air intake so water won't be sucked into the engine while crossing streams or deep puddles. For a real off roader, the exhaust will also be vented high so there is no water ingress into the engine.


3

xpda has a very good answer. I would augment it with an additional caution: carbon monoxide effects are cumulative, they don't go away very quickly once you are in fresh air... So driving short periods while exposed to CO, with breaks in between, may still be enough to cause problems. One common cause of exhaust in the cabin that xpda didn't mention is ...


3

Sounds like you TCC (Torque Converter Clutch) Solenoid is not releasing. It's a common problem for GM cars around those years. Basically your Torque converter is fluid coupler between the engine and transmission where your clutch would be in a manual transmission. Once you get up to speed the TCC locks up so that there is a one to one connection inside the ...


3

Check the seals where the axle-back attaches to the stock exhaust, you may have leak which can change the pressure and thus the sound.


3

Update: The problem was indeed a leaky exhaust system! Alarmingly, the service shop I had tasked with the repair did not find this leak, but another authorized dealer found and fixed it. I'm horrified that a repair shop can manage to not find a fault like this, but glad to note that I'm not stupid: there really was a problem. Since then, I've sold the car ...


3

I find heat is far more effective at removing stubborn bolts than PB blaster or the like.


3

One cause of pops is unburnt fuel hitting the exhaust manifold - many engines use fuel to cool the cylinder when you lift off, so this sprayed excess then burns as it hits hot metal in the exhaust. The burble on overrun is usually caused by ignition timing being retarded. Aside from those, any valve or gasket leaks could also cause pops.


3

gasket surface prep is an art and a science. yes, always replace gaskets when adjacent parts are disturbed. it is important to have a clean, even, sealable mating surface on each part so that the gasket can do it's job. different materials and shapes will require different approaches. i would avoid using a putty knife in general on aluminum due to the ...


3

It's possible that the smoke you're seeing isn't indicative of any major problem. Some of the VW diesel engines have a tendency to build up unburned fuel and other deposits on the exhaust side of the engine if they're driven for short trips and driven too gently. I don't have direct experience with the SDI engine, but this is a real problem for the TDI ...



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