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4

There are two ways to tell. Your local ford dealer can tell by decoding the VIN (the vehicle indentification number). It is usually located on the dashboard at the base of the windshield on the drivers side. If you look under the hood there is usually a sticker on the frame near the radiator that will say complies with California or 49 state emissions. The ...


3

I've never understood Ford, or many other domestic (at least, to me here in the US) car makers' reasoning behind their climate control systems. Later models are starting to have more digital and better controls, but the model year you have is a prime example. For domestics, Max A/C is recirculate and the A/C 'switch' is usually combined in the vent ...


3

I just installed a hitch from from Reese-hitches.com on my 1999 escort wagon this week. (1) Class I, 1-1/4 inch Receiver Hitch Part No: RT-443 (1) T-One Connector Wiring Light Kit Part No: 118344 The hitch worked out fine, but the wiring harness is not right, and apparently they do not make one for the escort wagon (we have a 5 plug harness going to the ...


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Your AirCon compressor comes in two halves. There is the pulley/clutch half, and the pumping element half. With the AirCon off the pulley and clutch arrangement are simply rotated by the serpentine belt, and the pumping element remains stationary. When you turn the AirCon on, the clutch is engaged and both elements turn together to pressurise the system. The ...


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Did you change out the master cylinder along with the brake booster when you did the swap? If so, you needed to bleed the brakes when you did this (assuming this from your comment about not bench bleeding the master cylinder). This would be why you are having to press the brakes nearly to the floor to get the car to stop. If you did bleed the brakes, perhaps ...


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Removing the head would most certainly find any damage if it exists. Especially since it still runs, the bottom end is likely intact. You're not likely to find anything by dropping the pan. Getting a good look at the valves and piston tops would be where I would start. This would involve removing the head to be absolutely sure, but one thing you might try ...


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I'm by no means an expert in engine repair, so take this answer more as a starting point than a conclusion. If the problem is the dropped valve seat, you may be able to determine this by taking out the spark plugs and inspecting the combustion chambers, though I expect this will be very difficult without some sort of specialized tool (automotive ...


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From the sites I've checked the fronts are the same the rears are different.



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