New answers tagged

0

Typically, when a car is having issues with idling or stalling the Idle Air Control Valve (IACV) is at fault. There are typically 1 of 2 issues. 1 - The port is dirty. Pull off your air cleaner hoses so you can see the throttle body. There should be a port on the side. This is for the IACV. Spray carb cleaner into this hole to remove deposits. ...


0

I noticed that whenever my change engine oil light comes on in the dash and I ignore it a few days and miles later a low oil light comes on and if it is still not attended to the engine shut down until New oil is added. This happens to me on a couple of occassions. My suggestion is keep your oil changed You car is trying to protect itself and save you money....


7

This looks like your first posting with Motor Vehicle maintenance and repair site. It looks like you are an engineering student, looking at a possible school project. Is that right? Welcome to the stackexchange! You have a whole lot of decisions to make. First Choice: Type of engine? I'm going to assume you want an internal combustion engine. ...


3

I think all the major points have been made, but there's one more to consider. Your engine probably idles between 750-900 RPM, running your engine below this under-drives your alternator, water pump, and most importantly your oil pump. Frequently letting your engine run under this starves it of lubrication. Over time this will reduce your engine's life. -...


0

I'm going with a leaking exhaust manifold for the ticking. Try tightening the manifold bolts a little. They will have a torque specification but hand tight will have a noticeable affect on the ticking if the manifold is your problem. Go back later and torque them properly. As far as the car running at 2000 RPM on start up, that is normal for most modern cars....


6

If I had to guess this sounds like a four cylinder engine, with one or even two cylinder's misfiring. Best guess is a problem with either a spark plug wires, or an ignition module. I'm looking at high resolution photos of your engine compartment and its not clear on what type of ignition system you have. Generally there are two types of systems. One has a ...


3

It depends on many factors like operating revolutions, engine performance, manifold location (cooling), etc. If you are concerned about overheat - don't worry, hot manifold is okay. Some high performed engines can heat a manifold to yellow hot. Car engine could heat it to red hot. If your concern is safety of other components of a car, you can wrap your ...


5

Those numbers do not seem horrible, unless the 140psi is low. You might want to repeat the test with the engine warm. I generally feel that a cold test only reveals inter-cylinder differnces (in your worst case only 18psi), but dynamic compression after everything is warmed up and expanded might be much better.


5

Yes, it does lead to a loss of a power, but your compression is not worth worrying about. Every engine will loose some compression after a few years. New rings wear out faster at the beginning and later they wears out slowly, so probably you won't see a difference for another 2 years.


2

If you have a blown headgasket, it won't last long - a few miles at most. Keep going too long as the engine will overheat and sieze up, and then you'll need a new engine. I'd suggest you get a few more quotes - You don't state where you are in the world, but the gaskets themselves are cheap, and it shouldn't need much more than half a day's labour - around ...


3

It is OK to used a metal tool on the valves. They are very hard and difficult to scratch. It is also OK to use oven cleaner on the valves. The steel is a relative of stainless and will be little affected by harsh cleaners. This is not true for the aluminum head and the valve seats are usually softer than the valves but are still hardened steel.


4

It isn't completely random, as there will always be one piston that is approaching TDC, and the compression building in that cylinder will ultimately cause the engine to stop. Any cylinder that makes it over TDC, will have a "spring" action that will tend to maintain RPM, as the compression energy is now released. This is critical to the brilliant and ...


0

Id be leaning toward an ignition problem. If theres an ignition control module, or something similar that controls the spark by taking readouts on various ignition and engine sensors, that's where I'd start. If the problem gets worse as engine warms, but seems fine when cold, that also indicates an electronic problem. As the part fails further, it will go ...


1

If it just died without any loud noises or the wheels locking up, and still cranks by key or by hand, then it's almost definitely not seized. It could be a number of things, like timing belt, lack of fuel/spark, or sensor failure. As suggested, connecting it to diagnostic computer may be helpful to point you in the right direction.


7

It's random. Usually won't come to a stop at top or bottom dead center because theres nothing to drive it to that point, and one of the pistons will be building compression at any given time of the engine cycle. So without some powering source to force it to a high compression location, it'll stop somewhere mid-stroke. Plus the crank wants to roll off from ...


4

If you can turn the engine over using the starter, the engine is not seized. Just because it died after such an event, doesn't mean it is going to do that. Definitely not good for the engine, but it doesn't mean it's seized. It really depends on how the engine died to tell you what exactly happened. If it just quit without any loud bang or loss of engine ...


0

The only cars that I've ever seen oil consumption like that on are a 500bhp BMW M5 and an Alfa Romeo (all alloy block and head). Both cars was subject to VERY hard use. In normal driving in a normal vehicle, I'd suggest that a quart in 1000 miles is excessive. For comparison, my 2012 Golf does not drop it's oil level between routine servicing, my 2003 ...


2

No, it doesn't necessarily mean you need to buy a new engine. Although if you don't get it seen to, you will be in the market for one soon enough. Generally speaking, as @user3188168 said, it's quite likely that it's the head gasket that's split, allowing some oil into the cooling system. The head gasket will need changing, and your radiator will need a ...


3

Depending on the cause of the fluids mixing: buying a new engine would be the most extreme of the possible repairs. The simplest repair for this would likely be a gasket replacement, which may still be quite costly, since (for example) head gaskets require taking apart most of the engine to replace.


1

I never have drained the gas out of mine,i have always exercised them at least twice a year once in the spring then once when the cold weather starts coming in the bowls on the carb are still clean,then top the oil off and gas too add some stabilizer and wait for the next outage so far so good,and they have always started when needed.


0

The fact that its intermittent does not rule out a vacuum leak but makes it less likely. A common cause is failure of the idle air control valve (IAC). It can be tested by applying 12 volts to the center terminal #2 and then applying a ground to the outer terminals. It should open when #1 is grounded and close when #3 is grounded.


2

I would definitely start with cleaning things before attempting to replace them. A simple solution may be to just clean your throttle body and idle air control valve (iac). Look at the air filter for large blockages just as an extra precaution. Take an overall glance at each intake piece to make sure nothing is disconnected, cracked, or broken and go from ...


0

As others have said, you should be fine with brake cleaner, but I'd recommend trying Simple Green or some other less-toxic degreaser first. I've had good luck with Oil-Flo Safety Solvent on aluminum rims.


1

Brake clean works fine but evaporates quickly (the whole point of it), Varsol (Solvent) or something similar works better for cleaning and then wash it off with brake-clean.


0

Should be fine. But don't use carburetor cleaner - similar packaging, but it leaves deposits around that you don't necessarily want. Don't let either of them sit on rubber or painted surfaces.


7

I use brake part cleaner on lots of things. It should be fine. Note- this is just personal experience. If someone pops up and says it's detrimental, I'll certainly listen.


5

The only curved bore designs I am aware of are toroidal I have been unable to find a match to the drawing, not even close. I took a hard look at steam engines as well. Here is an example of a toroidal design Here is a modern mock up of a similar design.


0

I have a 94 Acura Integra with the DOHC VTEC engine (B18C1). Just passed 350,000 miles. Still runs good, I take it to the red line at least once a week when its nice out. If you maintain it, it will run.


2

Honda used VTEC for two applications: Fuel economy. For example the F18B engine with peak power of 136 shp. Rev limit of about 6000 rpm. Sometimes called i-VTEC. Performance is decent but not spectacular (many have low torque at low rpm so you need to shift down for overtaking). Performance. For example the F20C engine from the S2000, with ~230 shp. ...


3

This is an interesting question, though it is probably way too broad. Honda claims that there has never been a warranty claim against their VTEC systems - as in, the solenoids and variable valve/timing system is quite reliable. This isn't at all to say that these engines don't fail - of course they do - however they have a very good track record for ...


5

Too long for comment, but I suspect wastegate linkage or door not closing fully due to distortion from heat (it's really hot around there). You could try and get it hot enough to duplicate the problem, park, and attempt operate the wastegate manually with pliers or gloves... but it's tricky to get to without removing the turbo heatshield. Also make sure ...


1

A minute or so is usually fine Unless your riding in sub-freezing temperatures of course, then you'll want to let it warm up a bit, but if not. I wouldn't worry much about this. The LC version of your BMW boxer motor has considerably tighter tolerances than the air cooled version as it does not have the temp/heat variance as much as an air cooled engine ...


2

From the pictures, that does appear to be the block. As for what would cause this damage, I'm not sure, but it doesn't look good. Usually damage in this area means a new engine is in order. If you really want to know what happened, pull the oil pan.


3

Your oil pressure is lower I think the big issue with lugging is a considerably lower oil pressure along with high load. You don't want your connecting rod breaking the hydrodynamic lubrication layer of oil between your connecting rod and crank pin thereby causing damage to the bearing and the pin. This could cause permanent engine damage. Doing this at ...


0

It sounds like either the solenoid or the starter are wired up incorrectly. If the signal wire to the starter is connected to 12v, then the starter will turn. Double check your solenoid wiring to be sure that it is correct. The solenoid probably has 3 or four connections- one for incoming cable from battery, one for outgoing power to starter, one ...


3

You have a nikasil coating on your cylinder walls You can't just bore, hone and assemble. You have to have a nikasil coating applied to the cylinder walls before reassembly. Your model year of BMW has the nikasil coating. I would not simply hone your cylinders, attempt to the coating, it may be required to put then next overbore size of piston in. If ...


4

It depends on the exhaust system. If it is a road bike with an exhaust system designed for the road, you need to keep the silencer/muffler/mute on it for optimum performance. Only a full race system, designed to run without a silencer (pretty rare these days with all the noise restrictions even on races) might suffer by having a silencer attached, but that ...


2

Personally, I replace the rings every time a piston goes back in the cylinder. While I can't speak for motorbikes (*I know they get dismantled a lot more often than a typical car engine) I would assume like with most wear items, you'd want to remove it, then put new ones on after.


3

How cold is very cold? The outside temperature when you go to start it is key. But in general, unless you are more than twenty or thirty degrees F below zero, I would say the answer is "no damage"... provided you have used an engine oil and an antifreeze mix that is appropriate for your climate. Your owner's manual should contain the information you need. ...


3

I'll start with the bad news - if it's the CD100 model without electric start then it's a no-go unless you replace the engine (I'm inferring this from your statement "customize my old bike with a self start"). You won't be able to retro fit a starter to it as the cases and internals will not be configured for one. However, if the engine does have electric ...


0

You're going to have to verify spark and fuel injector operation. Use a scope and backprobe the signal wires for any cylinder. You should also look at the cam and crank signals for irregularities or drop outs. You could use a multimeter or noid light to test the injector signal. Don't use a test light on the signal driver circuits. Replacing the PCM may or ...


2

Oil consumption in the LM7 engines is pretty common. The L33 in my '06 Silverado is around the same amount, maybe a little less. What you are talking about sounds more like a stuck/leaky injector. Oil smoke will usually last longer than 10 seconds, if that were the issue. And it would be distinctly blue, not black/dark. The way you could tell if this was ...


0

I'm not sure about you're particular model, but on my John Deere riding mower, the fuel pump is driven by vaccuum and the pickup is just above the oil sump. If there is too much oil in the pan it covers the pickup and it does not pump fuel. A previous answer suggests that there is no fuel pump for your model, so a good place to start is to follow the steps ...


4

I assume you mean that when the engine is cold, it requires the choke, but then if you stop and try to restart, then you have to turn off the choke. This is by design. The choke is a tool to allow a cold engine to run by enriching the fuel/air mix through restricting (or choking) the air supply - once the engine is warmed up, this is not needed any more. ...


0

i would assume that drl is either a relay or a circuit breaker for the running lights . You may have a either a short circuit (which would cause a circuit breaker to open) or a broken or loose cable or wire. Check your battery connections and cables to make sure everything is clean and tight.


2

I shaved .060" off the head gasket surface using a 8" wide belt sander at work. This increases the compression and REALLY provides more torque when the grass gets thick. I use 93 octane gas and have no heating problems. It Really works great! I even installed this modified head on the Brand New lawnmower I bought Of course a clean filter and sharp blade are ...


3

The longer you run it, the more damage you are going to cause. This will incur more cost when you do go to get it fixed due to the parts involved. Depending on which valve(s) is (are) sticking, you could be doing damage every time you start it up. I'm talking about the exhaust valve, as if one is open during the combustion cycle, you've damaged a valve and ...


1

I have only heard a rod knock, or spun bearing, once when I was asked to diagnose a friends car and although I had never heard one before I diagnosed it and it was in fact a spun rod bearing -- which was confirmed upon removal and disassembly and rebuild. Valve tick and rod knock are often confused. Neither is a particularly good situation, but rod knock ...


3

It's your valves or the cam chain If you have a ticking sound, those are your two options. You haven't provided much data or info at all. Adjust your valves .004 inch clearance for your intake valves .005 inch clearance for you exhaust valves OR Check your cam chain tensioner to ensure it's putting the proper tension on your cam chain.


4

I encountered a similar problem with my Honda D15 engine. The car would start fine when it was cold, but have trouble starting warm, stumble under acceleration and sputter/die at idle. I had also tried replacing the fuel filter, plugs, wires, and an o2 sensor to no avail. I then purchased a coil pack and distributor rotor/cap. I had just enough time to ...



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