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5

tl;dr: In common usage, there isn't a difference. The Subaru flat-4 is a boxer. Here's a lovely picture that I found on the Manchester Subaru site (I'm not a customer but I'm always encouraged when a dealer is willing to provide useful technical material!): As you can see from that picture, the pistons are moving in pairs: the two in the rear are in and ...


2

Yes, misfires vary in their severity. However, it is worth mentioning that your reader may be displaying old codes, or codes which were triggered by abnormal engine activity that is no longer present. For example, if the vehicle were filled up with a bad batch of fuel that had water it, it could temporarily cause misfires. The fault codes for misfires ...


5

tl;dr: They did. They're called Subarus. For completion, you should remember that Subaru has had great success with the 180 degree V4 (normally called a flat-4). By using a flat engine, they avoid many of the balancing issues faced by more narrow V configurations: the pistons are opposing and the crankshaft can be slightly shorter than on an inline-4. They ...


2

Besides the reasons Anarch mentions, one of the biggest reasons the V4 didn't take off is inherently, the V4 @ 60° is a rough running engine, especially at low RPM (idle & off-idle). It is very hard to balance. The V6 and V8 engines are much easier to balance, especially considering most of these are 90° V engines. Engines which are V4 @ 90° are much ...


1


6

One of the most influential reason as to why the V4 didnt take off is the ROI(return on investment) . The reason as to why we have the V configuration is to save space , High performance cars have V configuration since they have upwards of 6 to 8 cylinders and putting them in a straight configuration will eat up a lot of space thus the V. In the V4 that ...


2

First of all yes cars with odd numbers vibrate a lot and are not refined as much compared to even numbered engines. There are reasons as to why many markets use odd numbered cylinders. The Chevy spark has a 3 cylinder diesel variant. The Hyundai Accent has a 3 Cylinder engine. One of the Volkswagen Jetta had a 5 cylinder engine. Note that all of these are ...


0

I can't make out for sure which line you are pointing to, however if it's connected to the Tee I have circled then it's just a vacuum line.


0

Looks like the fuel line pipe that connects to the injectors line Or the return fuel line its not very clear


0

Engines with odd number of cylinders are more unbalanced compared to engine with even pair of cylinders. This causes an end to end rocking motion


0

The question does not specify what speeds are being attained or what grade of incline is being climbed, so this is a generic answer; If the vehicle cannot accelerate anymore it is due to a lack of power. Basically the resistances against the vehicle such as the weight of the vehicle against gravity on the incline, and aerodynamic drag have used all of the ...


3

To follow on from knocksAndMisfires' answer and your question update... DSG is a kind of AMT, in that the computer controls the actual changing of gears. To my mind there are a number of differences between AMTs and traditional transmissions - some are obvious advantages, but are offset by other disadvantages... Quicker gear changes - the computer can ...


5

Automated manual transmission is a kind of semi automatic transmission. The actual gear box will similar to the ones that you find in manual transmission, however the clutch control and gear shifting is automated. Mercedes had an AMT called sequentronic. Direct shift transmission (getriebe in German) has two intermediate shafts with alternate gears (one ...


3

As Brian commented, your question and the information we have is a little vague. Not repaired already: It won't drive at all if the timing chain is broken. No amount of cranking the engine will start it. For this year/make/model it would probably be cheaper to either purchase another vehicle or swap in a low mileage engine than repair the current one. If ...


0

Mike's answer is spot on. Using the long screwdriver is by far the best method for straightening this out. It can be frustrating, though. There is another way you can alleviate the condition if you just cannot get things aligned. You can move the spark plug wires one position (forward or rear) on the cap, which will straighten things out. You are keeping ...


2

If I understand you problem correctly you can't get the distributor to drop all the way down and line up. Older V-8 Chevys drove (spun) the oil pump with the distributor. The way it works is the crankshaft is connected to the camshaft by the timing chain. At the end of the cam shaft a gear meshes with the distributor drive gear. The bottom of the distributor ...


1

Weld a bigger nut on top of the stripped bolt, then slip a long metal pipe over an appropriate-sized wrench and try again. Soaking it overnight in some WD-40 will also help. Also try sharp taps with a hammer to "break" the rust.


0

I went through this same ordeal on a Ford Windstar. I tried a 6 point socket, then a bolt remover, but neither worked. Then I got the Irwin Bolt Out from an auto parts store. It has a curve inside the socket that keeps digging and biting into the bolt head, which worked for me. They were small 8mm heads so I couldn't use the Go2 Socket I found online. It ...


0

Allowing the engine to aspirate better; increasing its volumetric efficiency, increases it's rpm. Porting, valve angle considerations after the installation of aa larger duration and larger lift camshaft.A head package with a matching compression ratio and balancing of the rotation assembly.


4

I think @Zaid is correct on the first one (A/C). The second one, however, I believe is actually the Power Steering Pressure Sensor (PSPS) Connector, which uses the same pig tail as the injector harness, but would account for the good running engine. (Motorcraft part number WPT372) EDIT: Looking at the new pictures, it appears the upper pulley replaces an ...


4

Given its proximity to the AC compressor, the one to the left appears to be the wire for the AC compressor clutch; the connector looks similar to the one for a brand-new replacement: I'm speculating that the one on the right side of the picture is a fuel injector connector, a clearer picture from a different angle would help:


0

You should drain your tank and reload it with the correct fuel. See: What if you put diésel in an automobile that required diesel only


0

Bikes are for driving and not to keep it idling. the best thing to do is to switch off the engine instead of keeping it idling. that will save some fuel as well!!


1

In case you had the engine off while the fans were on, your car was in the "ON" state, which powers all the electric systems of your car. The fans were consuming most of the power which have drained the battery very quickly. You've started your car right on time to retain just as less energy as was needed to get your engine running again. The smell you ...


1

First of all This is not a problem with your vehicle its general physics and applies to all vehicles When your vehicle is in neutral there is no load on the drive train thus allowing the RPMs to reach its limiter easily, when you are in gear , the drive train has an opposing force of the road which is working in the opposite direction thus restricting the ...


1

This is not a problem. This is perfectly normal. Unless your car has immense power, you will need low gears to climb steep inclines. The higher the gear, the lower the effective torque available for acceleration. This is part of the trade-off gears give you: Low gears give you acceleration/torque so you can pull away from a stationary start and tow loads ...


2

It sounds as though the rear-end is too tight. There is a straight rod which runs through the back of the bike which holds the rear-end together. You can see it in the circled in this picture: If this isn't torqued correctly, it will cause drag on the rear end. Sounds like your's is torqued too much. Another area to look at is to see if the rear brakes ...


1

It clarifies half way through the article, stating "He clarified that Euro 4 fuel could still be loaded in old vehicles." (the "He" being Environment Secretary Ramon Paje). I don't think you'll have an issue.


0

As Dan says in the comments, have you tried a different battery? If you have power to the lights, you should have power to the starter, but a poor battery may not give enough power to fire the solenoid. The other possibility is that the shaking you have mentioned has caused one of the leads going to the starter to fail. There should be two cables attached ...


2

Yes, it's serious. It's usually either because your MAF sensor is dirty, or one or more fuel injectors aren't working properly. Check out this link. You should still be able to drive a car that's running too lean, but you should never, under any circumstances drive it fast or put it under heavy load. From the link Causes A code P0171 may mean that one ...


3

You would need a heavier flywheel. If you idle too low, your flywheel doesn't have enough momentum to keep the engine running smoothly. A heavier flywheel will remedy that.


1

Having a lean condition isn't good for the motor. Lean is higher oxygen and lower fuel. Oxygen burns hotter than fuel. Being lean is to have a condition where the fire in your engine is hotter. The results are increased wear on valves and potentially melting the aluminum of the head. The melting is under extreme conditions. You are in a situation where ...


3

The issue with low idle is more significant when viewed from the perspective of oil pressure. Reducing the idle, albeit a noble cause of saving the planet, reduces overall emissions insignificantly when compared to the implosion of an engine. The carbon footprint related to throwing a rod and having processed oil spill out over an open uncontrolled surface ...


2

tl dr - Upgrade to a 2500 or 2500HD pick-up. There are several issues you'll notice when hauling at the maximum and over the maximum of the towing capacity of the Avalanche. First off, the 2007 & 2008 MYs came with the 4L60e transmission. Why GM ever put these in a pickup truck is beside me. These were meant to go into passenger cars. While they are ...


1

The two things are entirely unrelated: 1 - this is normal. When you press the accelerator, there are a number of things that have to happen - more fuel to the cylinders, spark timing change, valve timing changes etc. and this takes some time to have an effect. If you had a turbocharged car you would notice a much greater lag, as there is a huge dependency ...


6

The only type of vehicle you need wait on is a diesel powered one. The reason for that is you need to wait (in most of them) for the glow plugs to heat the combustion chamber. Modern fuel injected cars will keep their fuel pressure after shutdown. It will stay there (usually) for a good 24 hours (Note: 24 hours is an approximation. It will take longer in ...


0

Sounds like the wire is mounted incorrectly at the points. There is an insulator where the wire in connected. Make sure the wire is connected to the points spring arm, and not to the base or mounting hole. If it is connected there it will be grounded all the time and will never produce spark at the coil. To check this, disconnect the wire and turn on the ...


5

While most new electronically controlled vehicles probably do have a rev-limiter built in, this doesn't mean you cannot go past the red-line of the engine. The red-line is the theoretical maximum you ever want your engine to run at and is the limit at which your engine is designed to work. Beyond this point one of the first bad things which occur is called ...


1

The engine not turning over is related to your starter circuit or your starter relay. If you have a good battery and your relay is functioning, you will here a clicking sound as you turn the ignition key to try and start the car. The power windows and radio have their own circuits, typically dedicated to the use. Radio, circuit, window circuit, lights, ...


5

The RPM's would certainly increase but the mechanical components would be prevented from exceeding maximum RPM's by a rev-limiter. Rev-limiters are built into the ECU (computer) of the car. When an engine is spinning at it's maximum RPM set by the manufacturer the ECU will not send a spark to particular cylinders to prevent the engine from spinning faster ...


3

The main difference between an air compressor and an internal combustion engine is the compressor doesn't have the heat/detonation phase which an engine does. This actually helps keep it cleaner than what you'd think. (So people don't think I'm crazy, an internal combustion engine and a compressor are both just air movers ... they just accomplish it a little ...


2

Electrolysis happens over time, and will not cause any damage over an 80 mile trip. People (wrongly) have used straight water in their radiator over the summer months thinking that's all they need and don't have issues until many years down the road. If you didn't worry about it and never changed it again, it would be an issue. Changing it out after an 80 ...


5

It's certainly not recommended, but I don't think it will ruin it, as long as you don't leave it in for too long... Flush the coolant system thoroughly to get rid of all traces of contaminants, and refill with proper coolant - it might be worth then doing another flush a few days later if you're worried.


0

It sounds as though your transmission is slipping or allowing the engine to rev. Once the transmission catches back up, it slams back into gear causing the jerk you are suggesting. This could easily be caused by a lack of (or low) transmission fluid.


1

Suzuki built two stroke gasoline motorcycle engines in the 1960's, 1970's which were every bit as durable as the four stroke motorcycle engines of similar displacement being offered at the time. Suzuki built a water cooler 3 cylinder 750cc two stroke motorcycle which a service life of over 100,000 miles without rebuild was not unheard of. I have one of these ...


0

I am assuming you removed the original condenser if it didn't have a uniset in it when you changed them. That being said, it sounds like the points are either not fully seated or adjusted way off. Loosen the screws and try pushing down while trying to slide the point set. There is a hole that the point pivot must fit into or it will not seat properly ...


-1

Buy a bottle of chemiweld, pour it into the radiator without the radiator cap. Let the motor heat up let it cool. Drive as normal flush radiator and heater etc. When the problem is solved. I know this is an old thread but for anyone new looking to solve the same problem this dude has had head gasket seepage .... water flowing into head and boiling cause ...


0

Is it not cranking even? If not, then I strongly suggest a hard reset of ECU and Engine Immobiliser.


2

As stated in the comments, it's a lot cheaper to remove excess weight. If you use this car as a daily drive it's best to keep stuff like a spare tire and jack in your car.. Start with the easy stuff: a lot of people have a lot of stuff in their car that they'll never need. If you want to make the car even more lighter, you could opt to remove the rear seat ...


3

Jetting a carburator - short answer You will require two things, probably. A size larger mainjet An adjustable needle jet Your main jet sits in the floatbowl, it's number 11. Off idle and higher the main jet contributes more and more to air fuel mixture as you open the throttle to wide open where the main jet is 99% of your fuel delivery. The ...



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