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A few thoughts (in no particular order): It sounds like one or more cylinders are not firing You'll want to isolate the problematic cylinder(s). Assuming the car has run for a bit since the timing belt swap, you could try to inspect the spark plugs to see if any of them is wet or looks different from the rest. This should give you focus in on the problem ...


1

Before you go thinking the belt is out of time, when your mechanic told you about the wires, what he may have been suggesting is that you have the wires on the wrong plugs. This will create the imbalance you are talking about, yet most of the time will not show a trouble code (because they are all still firing, just not at the right time). Double check to ...


2

In fuel-injected systems, hot-start problems indicate that the fuel line is unable to maintain pressure. This could be due to a few things related to the fuel supply line, including: a leaky fuel injector minute cracks in the fuel line which leak fuel when under pressure The reason why this happens only for hot starts is because the fuel is more likely ...


0

You can have a good alternator and still not charge the batteries if the connections are corroded in anyway or a battery clamp is loose or cracked. Also check the fusible links there should be one in line between the alternator to starter to battery circuit but if its pumping out 14 volts at 2000 rpm and wont idle for long afterwords then i suspect the ...


2

I agree with Gary's assessment about the Manifold gaskets. The Olds 3800 is a "workhorse" engine as is the 3.3, only you don't see much of the 3.3's on the shelf or in the shop. As this is an older piece of iron it stands to reason that the gaskets may need replacing. If you have a tuned ear you can hear a leak or at least hear the approximate location of ...


0

if you have an idle and stalling problem with a 3800 series 2, don't mess around with it. change the upper and lower intake manifold gaskets, and the upper plastic intake manifold plenum itself. and cross it off your list. that problem will drive you f-ing nuts. they can leak internally and defy all diagnostics. the lower intake manifold can leak vacuum ...


1

One other thing that may be the problem is that the water pump could have locked up. If the pump was running off of the timing belt/chain then it could have seized. This could have jammed the belt, and locked the engine. This could cause the valves to stop moving, while the pistons carry on. This causes the pistons to smash into the valves which could ...


3

It is mainly for aesthetics. Something else it can do for you is to allow you to see when you have a leak. I've seen blocks painted white for this reason. Something you didn't mention was whether you are talking about painting the outside or the inside of the engine. If done right, painting the inside of the engine can result in oil returning faster to ...


5

I think the overheating episode did a permanent damage to your car. A gasket could have cracked or the head could have warped or even cracked, thus allowing water into the engine itself. Too much heat in an engine can cause serious problems because heat causes metal to expand. The hotter the engine gets, the tighter clearances become until there are ...


7

For most practical purposes, it's done for cosmetic reasons. One might prefer to use black over silver for better heat dissipation but the motivation is almost always going to be to enhance appearance. In cast iron blocks, the paint can act as a means of rust prevention.


0

I would have checked the plugs and coil(s), but looks like you already found that answer.


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It could be that it's just getting worn out. Something you can check is to see if the exhaust is leaking around the manifolds ... look for black suet on the heads right at the exhaust manifolds. New manifold gaskets will fix this if it's actually the issue. This problem can actually affect the gas mileage as you will be sucking in oxygen at the leaks which ...


0

Most of the time when this occurs it is because of a dirty throttle body. You need to take it off carefully and clean it carefully (throttle body or carb cleaner), then re-install. You'll want to pull the negative lead to the battery when you do this. Then, upon re-install, you'll find it will probably idle just fine, but will want to rev high on its own ...


1

If you are looking for a true dollar cost per km, then do a stock rebuild on the engine. The small amount of abuse from the hp gain you are talking about can be easily absorbed by internals of a stock engine. You just need to ensure you are doing things right. There are several things you can do while rebuilding an engine which will help with longevity: ...


0

I'm told that the bulk of the break-in is done in the first few minutes of running and that no synthetic of any kind should be used. You're in "test pilot" land now, all bets are off... If it was me (a person not afraid of blowing up an engine), I'd switch to conventional and do a lot of WOT/decel runs to try to beat in the last of the break-in that I could ...


1

Normally if alternator is good, car won't die even without battery. I suspect alternator. I suggest you to buy a battery charger and charge battery and buy a Solar BA7 tester to test how many CCA are left in your battery. After eliminating battery problem, go ahead and buy an alternator.


4

Bad coils are just one of many things that could be to blame. I'd say stop changing coils. It is highly unlikely that they were the root cause of the problem to begin with. The symptoms provided are consistent with a misfiring engine. This usually means that there is an issue with the mixture of air and fuel reaching the engine (more on that in a bit). So ...


1

Modern ECU units and transmission computers store an increasing amount of persistent data between starts, which was virtually nonexistent in the 1970's and early 1980's. Usually this can be cleared by disconnecting the battery for an extended period, which is necessary in some rare instances. For the engine computer: recent and long term fuel ...


0

I think you have two completely separate issues here (brakes & starting). Since the engine is turning over, the starter is not bad. If there was a vacuum leak causing unmetered air to enter the engine, it would be running differently. It could just be that your MAF or other intake located sensors need cleaning for the starting. As for your brakes, it ...


0

Lapping can be difficult, even the pros don't get it right the first time. You fixed it right? A lot of guys have to go and re=lap a vale or two. As long as it is fixed now and is fine your did a GOOD job. Live and Learn right? I do not think your overheating problem was due to leaking exhaust manifold nor do I think exhaust valves are causing your ...


5

Under normal use (non-performance type use), the valves, both intake and exhaust, should last the life of the engine. If and when they do leak, it will not take long for the valve to become a burnt valve. In your case, I doubt they were leaking prior to pulling everything apart. If the exhaust valves had leaked, they would have been fried. If valves do not ...


0

Unless there are some serious modifications to your Jimmy, it doesn't have a carb. I would suggest you have a fuel injector which is stuck open.


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From your description, they did something wrong. It sounds as though there is a leaking gasket or the pan itself is leaking oil, which when low enough (oil), would cause an overheating issue. If the engine ran out of oil, this could cause your overheating issue, though you would have seen an oil light flash on first. I'm thinking the leaking you saw was not ...


-1

Seafoam works but can cause strong for small gas engine. i have had better luck with Reslin chemical products but my favorite is the two liquids that are combined into one and says repair in a bottle, if first treatment doesn't work try a second treatment. Best results for me so far...


2

I think your idea you are having a major carbon buildup is a good theory. You can try and get rid of the carbon by doing a Seafoam treatment. You mentioned are in the process of running a bottle of Techron through it. While this will help if you are using it all the time, it won't do much for a huge carbon buildup. Also, I believe you have carbon buildup in ...


0

If the heads are 243's and are stock on a 6.0L engine, you are looking at an LS2. The 243's also came on LS6 engines, but are 5.7L engines. If you are actually wondering which engine came out of the Avalanche and it has 243 heads, you are looking at a 5.3L with some other than stock heads. They didn't install the 243 heads on the truck engines. You ...


0

Yes it is reasonable. Remember, you only agreed to the cost of disassembly, which was the initial cost of $375. Taking things apart is usually far easier than putting them back together. Considering what is in their list of repairs, there was more than just the valve cover removed to figure out the issues. I'll almost guarantee you they removed the head as ...


1

Refuse to pay - they're trying to coerce you to use their services... On most cars, removing the cam cover is a 5 minute operation, and replacing it would be similar. Even a really complicated one isn't going to take more than half an hour, unless loads of stuff needs to be removed to get to it. I'd therefore consider 1-2 hours labour (at however much your ...


2

Are you sure you replaced the #5 coil? It should be the front driver's side. If you did, you might have gotten a bad coil. Another thing to try is to swap out the new coil with a different coil and see if the problem worsens or follows where you put the new coil. You could also do this with the old coil to see if the problem follows the coil or if it ...


0

I asked mechanics and they say it's usually the ignition coils for a misfire.


0

This is a typical case in the computer industry of fixed while troubleshooting. Not much else to be said.


-1

Water pump is the problem, replace and you'll be fine.


1

On some vehicles the Throttle Position Sensor can be adjusted. You can loosen the screws and gently move the TPS until the idle speed changes. I do not recommend doing this.


0

Engine internals can last a very long time. They are generally built to at least survive beyond the standard warranty term for the vehicle in question. This is typically 100K miles in modern vehicles. However, improper maintenance, driving beyond the normal parameters of the engine, and contamination can cause rapid deterioration of service life. Given the ...


3

It means that your camshaft position sensor or crank angle sensor is faulty. Either because they are actually faulty, or there is a wiring problem. Clearing the code won't do much. The symptoms of a bad cam or crank sensor are usually rough idling, difficulty starting and misfiring. Which makes sense, because your ECU gets wrong information regarding the ...


-4

When cars overheat, you must stop immediately there and then, otherwise local hotspot in the engine will result. Then part of engine warps under heat and is no longer air tight. At this stage car needs to be junked (or sold). So overheating is one of the most serious, if not the most serious problems that can happen to a car. Based on the noise you ...


4

It sounds as though you did suck up some water and were on the verge of hydrolock, but didn't quite get there. I also doubt you have caused any damage to the engine, in fact, you may have inadvertently helped your engine (though I wouldn't suggest you do this again!!!). The extra sputtering may have been a case of the filter on your CAI getting soaked with ...


0

As Nick said there are wear indicators. Most will have little arrows on the side wall to show you where the indicator bars or raised areas are. On the side of wall of tires there is the date of manufacture stamped as 4 digits. The first two represent the week in the year it was manufactured and the last two the year. May be difficult to spot at first but ...


2

Your engine was designed in such a way that it is most efficient between 3500RPM and 5000RPM. That means that the valve timing and camshaft profiles were made in such a way that your engine "breathes" best between those speeds. That's why you have the most torque in that region. Another thing is that as the RPM increases, it gets harder and harder to get the ...


0

The engine starts to consume more power in order to keep the piston and crank at high rpm due to higher friction associated with higher rpm.


2

There are various reasons as to why an engine is not efficient beyond its tuned range. Laws of thermodynamics, I do not want to get into scientific details but it simply means that you cannot transfer heat and convert it into energy efficiently beyond a certain point where the ambient temperature and cylinder pressure start to make more impact. Geometry of ...


0

Well every car has a maximum power output. After a certain point, the engine doesn't produce any more power. The RPM power range of your engine is dictated by how powerful it is, whether it is naturally aspirated or super/turbo charged, etc... Also past the 5500 RPM point on your car is most likely hitting the "red" section of your rev counter. The extra ...


2

This is true if there is a vacuum leak in the braking system, if that is what you are asking. You should be able to run the engine so there is a vacuum draw at the assist canister. You can either have a gauge on this to check for vacuum (exact measurement), or you could pull the vacuum line between the check valve and the vacuum assist canister and listen ...


3

Classic fuel starvation, probably caused by an old, gummed up fuel filter. Replace the fuel filter and purge the injectors (remove them from the head, crank the engine a few times and clean the injectors thoroughly). If this doesn't solve things get the fault codes read as it could be something like a problem with the injector loom.


1

I suspect issues in two components of your car but since you have already mentioned that Honda people have had a look not 100% sure. Clogged up Intake: I know it sounds very trivial but a clogged up intake is sometimes overlooked. Faulty EGR system: Almost al of the symptoms you suggest are very much mimicking the symptoms for a faulty EGR valve here are ...


2

If I had to choose, I'd say hot weather is easier on a car's longevity than is cold weather. Here is my reasoning: Hot weather: Breaks fluids down faster Keep an eye on engine oil/coolant levels. Maintain fluid more often (change oil/coolant sooner) Tires wear out faster Hot asphalt tears up the tread faster (higher temp rated tires are needed here) ...


1

This answer is a bit hypothetical; please take it as one path to follow, that may be useful in this and other, similar, cases. Perhaps the clue to the problem is not in the spark plug (or injector?) replacement, but rather in this part: "I had a engine tune up". While we do not know if the OP had this performed at an official garage, if this was the case ...


3

I don't think you replaced the injectors. I think you replaced the spark plugs. Injectors are what spray gas into the combustion chamber, and those are usually replaced or cleaned on older cars. You said it happened right after the spark plugs were replaced. Why not replace them again? They might be the wrong spark plugs, they might have the wrong spark ...


0

I've speed read this so excuse duplication. Service history is important. Make sure all stamps are present and consider calling the garage(s) who stamped them to confirm each service took place. You're spending a lot of money on the car. When you've lined up the final choice, I'd consider spending a few hundred more and get the RAC or AA to inspect it. ...


0

Checking the battery requires a battery tester and disconnecting the battery; the next best manner is to hook the car up to the correct service equipment and confirm it is the right battery for the car and use any test protocols available on the equipment and car, meanwhile also checking the charging system. After that, use 'close visual inspection': look ...



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