New answers tagged

1

You want to make sure the oil reaches its operating temperature (80°C+) from time to time. The coolant temp. indicator is not too helpful with that. You may have to do 15km or more of normal driving for the oil to be at 80°, probably more when hyper-miling due to less heat produced/wasted in the engine. Water (from combustion/condensation) and unburned ...


4

I apologize if my question wasn't as technical as you want. I would like to add I have no knowledge of cars and I'm just learning. I thought it was common sense to ask questions if you didn't know something. I am sure at one point you had no knowledge either. Its not a hard understand that no one knows anything until they sit down and learn. So ...


1

One common cause of engine sludge is failure of, or lack of a PCV heater. Shown in the picture is the PCV crankcase breather hose. The hose attached to valve cover. Notice the small black tube below the breather hose, blue arrow, in a U shape. Notice also that it is attached to the breahter tube. This tube carries engine coolant. It purpose is to heat the ...


1

You might have a tear in your CV carburetor diaphragm At the tops of your carburetors there is a cover with 4 screws that gives access to your CV diaphragm and slide. The CV (constant velocity) carbs adjust for barometric pressure automatically. The difference in pressure from your intake tract and the atmosphere raises and lowers you slide that has the ...


-1

Usually a headgasket or crack in the engine block, which lets coolant/antifreeze into the oil. Water in the oil gives you the milky froth that you see with a broken headgasket, but the coolant itself will turn to gel. Can go on for years without being spotted, because it won't drain out of the plug. The use of sealer isn't the cause of the problem, but ...


4

Usually sludge and gelling is caused by infrequent oil changes or no changes at all. I have done a few motor jobs that had oil gelling and assumed it was the original oil that came in the engine. I call most Oil additives "mechanic in a can", and most do more harm than good. Regular oil changes prevent sludging and gelling.


0

A couple of tests you can do to help determine what is happening. Head gasket: Compression test. minimum 120 psi, should all be within ~10% Oil and coolant are mixed. Check oil and coolant. Exhaust smells like coolant or burning oil. Might smoke excessively Bubbling in the radiator while running. Check plugs for oil/coolant. Cooling System: First, fix ...


1

This is a bit difficult to diagnose over the internet, but it sounds like you have a coolant circulation problem as well as a pretty bad oil leak. I would take it to GMC or Chevrolet and pay them to diagnose it. It only costs $100.00. A skilled tech can tell you exactly whats wrong with it and how to go about fixing it. If it's a head gasket (Which it sounds ...


4

A flashing check engine light means you have an active misfire. Driving your car while misfiring for an extended period of time can cause damage to your catalytic converter, so try not do do that. Studdering/juddering or however you want to describe it is also a definite sign of a misfire. Suspecting the coil(s) or wires is good, and that should be your ...


3

You can adjust your valve lash You have nothing to worry about. Adjusting valve lash is a standard maintenance item and should be done upon any maintenance or tune up's of your vehicle. As you can see in the image, getting to the adjustment is quite simple. From there, follow your factory manual regarding reducing the amount of valve lash clearance. ...


2

Alldatadiy is similar to Mitchell on Demand; some find the interface easier to use. Alldata Some sites that are not necessarily DIY, not free but can be most helpful if one can qualify for membership. I-atn.com: lots of threads on theory and technical discussions. Lots of help requests on specific problems. Membership has some restrictions. Moderate ...


7

You can test your rings and head gasket with a leak down tester Checking your spark plugs as shown in @Zaid's post is the first order of business. You will see it on the plugs. Now, if you do see an oil fouled plug, you will need to identify the source of the oil. Possible Sources of Oil Intake valve guide seal Rings Head gasket PCV valve Any of ...


1

spark plug wires should last a very long time, so just check them when you get the plugs done, and replace if they're worn out. wires don't really wear with distance, it's time and heat cycles that cause the insulation to eventually degrade. usually there good for several years look for cracking of insulation, particularly at joints. check for corrosion of ...


8

Pull the spark plugs and inspect them. Oil-fouled spark plugs will look wet and black.


1

Most manufactures have a website where repair data can be viewed and printed, some are easy to use some are almost impossible but the the info is in there. Some examples are: BMW: oss.bmw.de Peugeot: serivebox.peugeot.com VW: erwin.volkswagen.de Audi: erwin.audi.com Once you have an account set up you can pay for access in what ever time amount you ...


0

There are physical repair manuals you can buy from a company called Haynes. The manuals are based on tearing down and rebuilding whatever car is in question and can be useful references if you are unsure the car you are working on.


2

More than likely your Honda has a CVT transmission and this is normal behavior for a computer controlled CVT, to let it rev higher when under a load such as driving up a hill.


1

New cars are good in hot or cold like others have said .Most old american stuff is good because the USA has big temperature extremes .Car manufacturers wanted the cars to go to Texas or Canada .Old British cars were primarilary designed for the British Isles .When they went to warmer climates like NZ and Australia there were overheating problems .Some ...


0

I have a 2001 Pontiac Sunfire that HAD a similar issue. After having been looked at by far too many people, one mechanic figured out how to recreate the issue by pouring water on a certain part of the engine while running (sorry I'm not sure where exactly), but even that didn't shed much light on the issue since it was supposed to be acceptable to do that. ...


7

The engine will be fine - cars are designed to work in all conditions anywhere in the world. VW has a testing center that can theoretically test their cars and engines to work from -40 to 150C (saves on flying development cars to Finland and the Sahara) There will be some differences in the car trim levels; for example, cars in hot countries probably ...


4

I'd imagine that just swapping the coolant and potentially installing a block heater would be good enough, even if there were differences. Like purchasing any other vehicle, though, it certainly wouldn't hurt to have it inspected, and make sure that it runs without issue prior to purchasing it.


5

Since it's a 1.2 I'm betting it's petrol, so you don't have some of the issues that diesels suffer from. White smoke is often water. Grey/black smoke will be oil. Either way, something is getting into the combustion chambers which really shouldn't be there. My money is on the head gasket, because that can fail in a fairly on/off kind of way, but as other ...


-1

it's not the oil my friend. I had the same problem with my diesel 2008 fiesta. A huge white smoke comes from the exhaust and when you see it first, you think that the car is burning! The problem is with the gas injector in the engine. It costs about 400$ in Turkey, but in your region it depends. You should immediately bring it to the service otherwise ...


21

If it is burning it's oil, the oil is getting somewhere it shouldn't do - and changing the plugs and coil will make no difference to that! As the oil smoke is coming out of the exhaust, that suggests to me that the oil is getting into the cylinders - the most likely causes for this are a blown headgasket, failed valve stem seals, or failed piston rings. A ...


7

It's completely normal, nothing to worry about It's simply the gap between the sleeves. If you look from above, straight down, you will see a straight edge cut into the outside diameter of the metal sleeves that are pressed into the aluminum cylinder block. The straight edge is there so the sleeves can co-exist in close proximity without encroaching into ...


3

I don't have enough reputation to comment, but the small economy cars (K or Kei cars) in Japan also have this StopStart feature, as Mauro commented (for European cars). I think this feature is now common, say the last 3-5 years, across all K-cars (multiple manufacturers). On these cars, this StopStart feature is also available on automatic cars, so the ...


5

To add to the other answers, in a manual vehicle, the road wheels are usually disconnected from the engine when at a stop either by putting the transmission in Neutral, or by depressing the clutch pedal. In an automatic vehicle, a torque converter essentially does the same thing as a clutch, but does not require manual intervention. These mechanisms ...


23

The answer to your question is both yes and no. Yes in majority of the conventional vehicles, the pistons keeps moving even when the vehicles is at a stop light. The idle RPM, which is usually between 600RPM to 1000RPM, signifies the speed of the crankshaft. The fuel is calculated by the ECU (or ECM or PCM) depending upon the load, which is a calculated ...


1

We use a pressure washer for this job. We remove the oil pan and valve covers. We then pressure wash from every angle we can reach. It makes a big mess, cover up everything you do not want to clean up later. We then reinstall the oil pan an valve covers, fill with oil, add a new oil filter. Then the engine is started and run at idle only for about 20 ...


12

In most cars, yes the engine continues to rotate and the pistons go up and down in the cylinder bore due to combustion and the engine continuing to run. Some vehicles have an "auto stop" feature which kills the engine when it's not needed, but that's usually after several seconds of sitting still, as long as other parameters are met as well. Most vehicles ...


5

Lots of elbow grease. Really, if you don't want to use chemicals, you are stuck with using cleaning utensils like putty knife, toothbrush, rags, and whatnot. Personally, there really isn't a problem with running the engine with a can of SeaFoam (or the like) in it for a period of time (under 100 miles), then dumping it out with the oil. Most of the sludge ...


3

Physics suggests that its easier to pull vs push, but based on specific conditions and assumptions. Depends on the vector of the external force of the push / pull and where and how it acts on an object. I believe in a motorized wheeled vehicle, its not nearly as significant, especially since the rotational torques are being transferred to the ground at ...


1

Engine Position does play a part but its not what you think, RWD cars have the power transmitted to the rear wheels and has to make a 90 degree turn in the differential, resulting some power loss (fuel efficiency). FWD cars beat this by turning the engine sideways, now the axles turn parallel to the engine, no redirection of power is needed. The net result ...


4

What is the optimal use of a choke? Knowing how to use it as explained by Nic C What are the cons of using it incorrecly? Fouling spark plugs which will cause a misfire even after it warms up. Gasoline getting in the oil past the piston rings due to being over rich too long and and causing pre-mature engine wear and lower compression due to the ...


0

The fact that you stalled the car uphill and that it is acting that have most likely nothing in common. Gear knob vibration is quite normal on older cars. Also, when car is on low RPM under load, vibrations tend to be more prominent in manual transmission cars. Start with driving the car on the flat surface to see if it's accelerating as expected. If the ...


7

You should avoid over-use of the choke if possible, as over-fuelling the engine will cause more carbon build up, shortening the life of the plugs and reducing the time before the engine needs a "decoke" to get rid of the build-up. Plus it wastes fuel! Of course, too little is just as bad... I've always gone for the following, though I don't know if it's ...


9

Cabin filters on modern cars use something called activated carbon (or at least some of them do) which is basically two paper / cotton sheets either side of a fine layer of carbon particles. It looks to me as though your cabin filter has a hole in it and therefore is blowing carbon all over the inside of the cabin. I'd take it back to wherever installed ...


0

Anything to do with FUEL, especially if the smell is strong should be dealt with immediately. I would suggest to just bring the car to the dealership and let them run a diagnostic on the car. Then you will know for sure if the problem is a easy fix or something worse.


-1

I use 94 octane ethanol free fuel. It supposedly has a shelf life of 2 years. Not going to test that though!


6

The fact that you can smell fuel in the exhaust is a strong indication that the engine is running rich. This means that there is more fuel than required by the engine. There are many things which could cause this and the sensible course of action would involve hooking the engine computer to a scan tool to retrieve data about fuel trims, and O2 sensor ...


1

Head/ Block seal doesn't always work. It's also pretty controversial about what happens when you put it in. I've used it a few times and it only worked once. There is also no real scientific evidence that it works, it's more of "Theoretically" it should work. That being said, don't automatically assume you have a head leak or block leak. Running hot can ...


3

Sounds like a possible evaporative system issue involving the purge valves that vent fuel vapor from the gas tank. If the OBDII -on board diagnostic code that triggers the check engine light is P0440 then that is the issue. If the purge valve remains open for too long it will eventually damage the catalytic converters by sending too much unburnt fuel ...


4

There is more than likely one of two things going on here. Sticking/Stuck Lifter There could be a lifter going bad. These tend to make a lot of noise up top, then can quiet down after the oil starts flowing and the engine warms up. This isn't an easy thing to fix, but the lifter quite readily could live the rest of the vehicles life like this without any ...


1

In some industries at least, like aviation, we often retard the throttle (i.e. reduce engine output), not just the timing.


6

Going to take a stab at this... I am not an expert, just what I've put together in my head. A lot of this gets into more general engine tuning/building. BSFC is basically how much power you output for a given amount of fuel. For a given engine, this is dependent on load and RPM. Your lowest BSFC is around your maximum torque at part-throttle. It all ...


2

Retarding an engine is usually done on industrial or fixed installation engines that do things like run conveyor belts or other pieces of equipment at a fixed speed. Retarding the engine simply means to slow down the operating speed of the engine, usually to control the equipment or process they are driving. For example, if you had an engine that was running ...


8

What does retarding an engine mean? Retarding an engine is essentially a vague, but blunt term. It just means that in one way or another, you are hindering the engines ability to provide driving force, and in some applications you are actually using a device to work against the engine and vehicle.. There are several ways to do this and several reasons for ...


11

Advancing or retarding an engine is the term used to describe adjusting the timing slightly to make the spark occur slightly earlier (Advanced) or later (retarded). Generally the timing is set so that the spark occurs slightly before (in advance of) top dead centre (TDC), because it takes time for the air-fuel mixture to burn and expand - you ideally want ...


4

Get a bunch of carburetor cleaner and some oil picks Really, it's not a big job but it's a little nasty. Having some metal mixing bowls to put the EGR into when you spray it down will help to contain the mess into a nice consolidated little package. Using some glovers as well is not a bad idea. How I've done it and I've only done one. Remove it ...


1

Breaking it down, Does sitting in Neutral put less wear on the transmission than Drive? Does the act of moving from D to N and then back to D put wear on the trans? And... (OP's overall question) do either of these "significantly" damage (i.e., cause to fail sooner than other parts) the transmission? So... Perhaps surprisingly, putting it in N wears ...



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