Hot answers tagged

21

The answer to your question is both yes and no. Yes in majority of the conventional vehicles, the pistons keeps moving even when the vehicles is at a stop light. The idle RPM, which is usually between 600RPM to 1000RPM, signifies the speed of the crankshaft. The fuel is calculated by the ECU (or ECM or PCM) depending upon the load, which is a calculated ...


19

If it is burning it's oil, the oil is getting somewhere it shouldn't do - and changing the plugs and coil will make no difference to that! As the oil smoke is coming out of the exhaust, that suggests to me that the oil is getting into the cylinders - the most likely causes for this are a blown headgasket, failed valve stem seals, or failed piston rings. A ...


12

In most cars, yes the engine continues to rotate and the pistons go up and down in the cylinder bore due to combustion and the engine continuing to run. Some vehicles have an "auto stop" feature which kills the engine when it's not needed, but that's usually after several seconds of sitting still, as long as other parameters are met as well. Most vehicles ...


11

Advancing or retarding an engine is the term used to describe adjusting the timing slightly to make the spark occur slightly earlier (Advanced) or later (retarded). Generally the timing is set so that the spark occurs slightly before (in advance of) top dead centre (TDC), because it takes time for the air-fuel mixture to burn and expand - you ideally want ...


9

The range switch doesn't think the car is in park. On Fords theres an adjustable cable if you look on the driver side of the transmission there will be lever with a cable attached. Sometimes the clip on the cable fails. if the cable is OK pull the lever all the way into park and it should start. If it doesn't you probably need a new range switch.


9

No. Not by any significant or even measurable amount. Constantly using the shifter may, over time, wear the bushes and linkages prematurely but these parts are usually inexpensive and simple to replace. The transmission itself will be unaffected.


9

Cabin filters on modern cars use something called activated carbon (or at least some of them do) which is basically two paper / cotton sheets either side of a fine layer of carbon particles. It looks to me as though your cabin filter has a hole in it and therefore is blowing carbon all over the inside of the cabin. I'd take it back to wherever installed ...


8

The general thought with the 400ci SBC is, when they are overbored by more than .030", you start running into overheating issues due to the Siamesed bores. This is not true. The overheating issue usually lies in the coolant passages (sometimes considered steam holes) which allow flow from the block to the head. These are very small holes which tend to get ...


8

The BSFC number is usually calculated by the fuel consumption divided by power output of the engine. The BSFC rating for a specific engine will also vary depending on the rpm and load. The 3 dimensional(BSFC/rpm/load) map of the BSFC numbers is useful for finding the most fuel efficient operating conditions for a specific engine. Peak efficiency commonly ...


8

This phrase has been around very long and has been used in the aviation industry as well as automobile. This is a very good, and more importantly, very easy for anyone to understand way of describing the four cycles of the engine. Here is an excerpt from an Aviation safety report from 1958: Air Safety Forum: Reports Presented at the Annual Air Safety ...


8

What does retarding an engine mean? Retarding an engine is essentially a vague, but blunt term. It just means that in one way or another, you are hindering the engines ability to provide driving force, and in some applications you are actually using a device to work against the engine and vehicle.. There are several ways to do this and several reasons for ...


7

OHC engines tend to be able to rev higher mostly due to the significantly lower valve train weight which makes for greatly improved valve control and higher potential RPM before float occurs. OHV engines have pushrods and relatively heavy rockers as opposed to OHC which does away with that. The inertia on the valve is lower and therefore controlling it ...


7

As long as you have Tuned Port Injection (TPI), the Schrader valve is located at the back of the fuel rail on the passenger side (near the distributor). You have to use a 90° elbow in order to attach it, because the upper plenum sits right over the top of it. If your engine is carb'd, you'll not have one. EDIT: Here is a little broader picture of my own ...


7

Put a DOHC head next to a pushrod head and the answer is immediately obvious. The heads from pushrod V8s seem impossibly tiny if you've only ever seen DOHC heads before. And since the block doesn't actually take up that much space in the overall size of the engine, shrinking the heads makes an enormous difference in the overall size and weight of the engine. ...


7

Short answer - no. It's perfectly okay. And , it's also perfectly okay to be annoyed. It's one of those things mechanics like to do (no offence to anyone). Similar to endlessly hitting refresh on a windows machine. Your car, as do most modern cars, has a rev-limiter and unless you've crossed that by downshifting, there's no need to be worried. Please ...


7

You should avoid over-use of the choke if possible, as over-fuelling the engine will cause more carbon build up, shortening the life of the plugs and reducing the time before the engine needs a "decoke" to get rid of the build-up. Plus it wastes fuel! Of course, too little is just as bad... I've always gone for the following, though I don't know if it's ...


7

The engine will be fine - cars are designed to work in all conditions anywhere in the world. VW has a testing center that can theoretically test their cars and engines to work from -40 to 150C (saves on flying development cars to Finland and the Sahara) There will be some differences in the car trim levels; for example, cars in hot countries probably ...


6

I believe this is normal behavior. I've test-driven a 2010 Ford Explorer; when the car is in P it will not allow you to go past 2500 rpm. When in D, no such limit.


6

Recommend going to your nearest auto parts store and picking up a Chilton manual for your make/model. There are a few other publishers you may like better. From what I can tell they're all about the same. These manuals aren't perfect, and don't always have as much detail as you'd want, but they do have a lot of diagrams and are a good starting point.


6

Going to take a stab at this... I am not an expert, just what I've put together in my head. A lot of this gets into more general engine tuning/building. BSFC is basically how much power you output for a given amount of fuel. For a given engine, this is dependent on load and RPM. Your lowest BSFC is around your maximum torque at part-throttle. It all ...


6

The fact that you can smell fuel in the exhaust is a strong indication that the engine is running rich. This means that there is more fuel than required by the engine. There are many things which could cause this and the sensible course of action would involve hooking the engine computer to a scan tool to retrieve data about fuel trims, and O2 sensor ...


6

It's completely normal, nothing to worry about It's simply the gap between the sleeves. If you look from above, straight down, you will see a straight edge cut into the outside diameter of the metal sleeves that are pressed into the aluminum cylinder block. The straight edge is there so the sleeves can co-exist in close proximity without encroaching into ...


5

OHC vs OHC - Pro's and Con's Overhead valves and a single overhead cam can have very similar results. If you add in DOHC you will get into another world of comparison. Here is an excellent post regarding the delta between DOHC and OHC. what is difference between DOHC and SOHC? Notice the OHC has rocker arms and the DOHC has the cam acting directly on ...


5

Paulster2 is right, varying the injection timing with respect to the engine crank angle timing is the main way to control the combustion process in a diesel engine. In a conventional gasoline engine (PFI or SIDI) fuel and air are largely pre-mixed before the spark event (which controls the start of the combustion process) which then leads to a fast ...


5

It shouldn't as stated above, but there are bushings and bearings that will get worn out, its probably better to just leave it in gear. Engineering Explained did a good review on this, so I recommend checking this out: Engineering Explained Automatic Transmission


5

Lots of elbow grease. Really, if you don't want to use chemicals, you are stuck with using cleaning utensils like putty knife, toothbrush, rags, and whatnot. Personally, there really isn't a problem with running the engine with a can of SeaFoam (or the like) in it for a period of time (under 100 miles), then dumping it out with the oil. Most of the sludge ...


5

To add to the other answers, in a manual vehicle, the road wheels are usually disconnected from the engine when at a stop either by putting the transmission in Neutral, or by depressing the clutch pedal. In an automatic vehicle, a torque converter essentially does the same thing as a clutch, but does not require manual intervention. These mechanisms ...


5

Since it's a 1.2 I'm betting it's petrol, so you don't have some of the issues that diesels suffer from. White smoke is often water. Grey/black smoke will be oil. Either way, something is getting into the combustion chambers which really shouldn't be there. My money is on the head gasket, because that can fail in a fairly on/off kind of way, but as other ...


4

The D16A8 engine is the equivalent to the ZC DOHC engine (non-vtec). The VTEC head from the D16Y8 will not bolt on. Neither will the head from a B16A1. The head on the D16A8 is superior to that of the D16Y8 even without the VTEC. It flows better and really likes to be turbocharged. I suggest you turbocharge the engine instead of an engine swap. Cheaper and ...


4

I don't think so I've had many experiences with strictly oil cooled engines. In particular the 1986 Suzuki GSXR 750/1100 platform. They went strictly oil cooled with a giant oil cooler and 8 quarts of oil. As you can see, this motor is filled with oil galleys and has no coolant or radiator. Another note, I live in the desert of the US Southwest where ...



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