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21

If it is burning it's oil, the oil is getting somewhere it shouldn't do - and changing the plugs and coil will make no difference to that! As the oil smoke is coming out of the exhaust, that suggests to me that the oil is getting into the cylinders - the most likely causes for this are a blown headgasket, failed valve stem seals, or failed piston rings. A ...


11

The 1000cc is the displacement of the engine. That means the total volume of all combustion chambers which is the area of all the cylinders times the length of the piston travel in the cylinder. Here is a picture of what that means: This image comes directly from Wikipedia. In the image the orange region shows the volume measured by the displacement. ...


9

Your oil pan didn't rust I would just like to point out that your oil pan can't just rust out. It is made of material that doesn't rust. So when you had a hole in your oil pan it more than likely hit a rock or curb or something that penetrated it. Perhaps the other driver of the vehicle. On the other hand, if your oil pan was replaced with something ...


8

The Royal Enfeild is a very old design. The motorcycle is based upon an old British design from World War II and has changed very little over the years. I do not know what type of quality control process the Indian manufacturing of the vehicle has implemented so that is very difficult to asses. It sounds like your gas cap vent or your fuel tank vent is ...


8

Pull the spark plugs and inspect them. Oil-fouled spark plugs will look wet and black.


7

It's completely normal, nothing to worry about It's simply the gap between the sleeves. If you look from above, straight down, you will see a straight edge cut into the outside diameter of the metal sleeves that are pressed into the aluminum cylinder block. The straight edge is there so the sleeves can co-exist in close proximity without encroaching into ...


7

When you start the engine and you hear the sound, does it sound better after the vehicle is warmed up? A rod knock will only sound worse (louder) as the engine heats up. It will not go away as the engine gets warmer. If it does, it is probably something like an exhaust leak which closes itself as the engine manifolds get warm. The opposite could be true as ...


7

The engine will be fine - cars are designed to work in all conditions anywhere in the world. VW has a testing center that can theoretically test their cars and engines to work from -40 to 150C (saves on flying development cars to Finland and the Sahara) There will be some differences in the car trim levels; for example, cars in hot countries probably ...


7

You can test your rings and head gasket with a leak down tester Checking your spark plugs as shown in @Zaid's post is the first order of business. You will see it on the plugs. Now, if you do see an oil fouled plug, you will need to identify the source of the oil. Possible Sources of Oil Intake valve guide seal Rings Head gasket PCV valve Any of ...


6

There are three common units used when measuring engine displacement. The two you've found are cubic centimeters (cc) and liters (L). There are 1000cc in a L so conversion between the two is fairly straightforward. Smaller engines are often measured in cc because it is awkward to talk about your .205L engine - instead you would refer to it as a 205cc ...


5

Since it's a 1.2 I'm betting it's petrol, so you don't have some of the issues that diesels suffer from. White smoke is often water. Grey/black smoke will be oil. Either way, something is getting into the combustion chambers which really shouldn't be there. My money is on the head gasket, because that can fail in a fairly on/off kind of way, but as other ...


5

Liter Class is a Reference from the FIM and AMA Superbike Series The term liter class was popularized in 1976 with the inception of the AMA Superbike Championship. The class has a 1000cc displacement limit and the term 'liter class' as slang for the 1000cc Superbike championship was born. Later, the class was reduced in displacement for safety reasons and ...


4

I'd imagine that just swapping the coolant and potentially installing a block heater would be good enough, even if there were differences. Like purchasing any other vehicle, though, it certainly wouldn't hurt to have it inspected, and make sure that it runs without issue prior to purchasing it.


4

Usually sludge and gelling is caused by infrequent oil changes or no changes at all. I have done a few motor jobs that had oil gelling and assumed it was the original oil that came in the engine. I call most Oil additives "mechanic in a can", and most do more harm than good. Regular oil changes prevent sludging and gelling.


4

I apologize if my question wasn't as technical as you want. I would like to add I have no knowledge of cars and I'm just learning. I thought it was common sense to ask questions if you didn't know something. I am sure at one point you had no knowledge either. Its not a hard understand that no one knows anything until they sit down and learn. So ...


4

The 3.7 is notorious for having a rocker arm fall off and or lifters collapsing. This is usually accompanied by a check engine light being illuminated. Use a stethoscope or a long screw driver and try to isolate where the knock is coming from. If it's coming from a valve cover, remove the valve cover and you're likely to find a rocker laying around. If ...


4

Sometimes it is hard to tell the difference between a rod knock, wrist pin or piston slap in the early stages even when using a mechanics stethoscope. A main knock is a deeper sound that is more pronounced at the bottom of the block as apposed to the top when using a stethoscope. Hard knocks that happen at startup and go away quickly are a sure sign it is ...


4

A flashing check engine light means you have an active misfire. Driving your car while misfiring for an extended period of time can cause damage to your catalytic converter, so try not do do that. Studdering/juddering or however you want to describe it is also a definite sign of a misfire. Suspecting the coil(s) or wires is good, and that should be your ...


4

Before suspecting a bad O2 sensor... You need to be sure that the replacement MAF is suitable for your car. You mention the replacement MAF is a 5-pin and not a 4-pin like the one originally on the car. If the new sensor has a different flow-voltage calibration this would go a long way to explain what you are seeing. This is because the onboard fuel ...


3

I don't have enough reputation to comment, but the small economy cars (K or Kei cars) in Japan also have this StopStart feature, as Mauro commented (for European cars). I think this feature is now common, say the last 3-5 years, across all K-cars (multiple manufacturers). On these cars, this StopStart feature is also available on automatic cars, so the ...


3

You can adjust your valve lash You have nothing to worry about. Adjusting valve lash is a standard maintenance item and should be done upon any maintenance or tune up's of your vehicle. As you can see in the image, getting to the adjustment is quite simple. From there, follow your factory manual regarding reducing the amount of valve lash clearance. ...


3

This is mainly a question of engine balance. A good video to understand engine balance is done by the Engineering Explained YouTube channel here. Once you have an understanding of engine balance you can then understand why, for example, a 5 cylinder engine is more challenging to introduce in a production vehicle: Wikipedia, Concerning a straight 5: ...


3

You are describing a lean condition The more you open your throttle the more vacuum you are creating in your carburetor venturi and your intake manifold. When you are operating at higher RPM any unmetered air leaks into your system can become more obvious. Unmetered air is air that is getting into your system after the fuel has been delivered. If you ...


3

The simple fact is that there are tons of ways for cars to get oil on the engine rather than in the engine. There is engine oil, AC compressor oil, and power steering fluid. Over time, most engines will have some kind of leak. Maybe its a small leak from the head cover gasket or even a cracked PCV valve. It could also be spilled when filling the oil. ...


3

It sounds a lot to me like it could be your car's O2 (lambda) sensor in the exhaust. From wikipedia Oxygen sensor Function of a lambda probe Lambda probes are used to reduce vehicle emissions by ensuring that engines burn their fuel efficiently and cleanly Sensor failures Normally, the lifetime of an unheated sensor is about 30,000 to ...


3

It just so happens I wrote a How-To article on AudiWorld.com about tune reviews for the A4 B7 platform. For instance, you can purchase a Stage 3 remap of your computer from GIAC (assuming a 2.0 TFSI engine) and have the car produce an extra 100-130hp with 75-145 lb-ft gained in torque. Not only will you want your cold air intake, but you'll need some other ...


2

My sister has a 2000 Cadillac DeVille And it's doing the same thing. A car has two lines that that the radiator cools the motor oil and the transmission fluid her car has oil in the radiator but not in the engine the line for oil has a Crack in it and that's what's causing the oil to get in the radiator fluid. So the line has to be replaced.


2

You want to make sure the oil reaches its operating temperature (80°C+) from time to time. The coolant temp. indicator is not too helpful with that. You may have to do 15km or more of normal driving for the oil to be at 80°, probably more when hyper-miling due to less heat produced/wasted in the engine. Water (from combustion/condensation) and unburned ...


2

Alldatadiy is similar to Mitchell on Demand; some find the interface easier to use. Alldata Some sites that are not necessarily DIY, not free but can be most helpful if one can qualify for membership. I-atn.com: lots of threads on theory and technical discussions. Lots of help requests on specific problems. Membership has some restrictions. Moderate ...


2

More than likely your Honda has a CVT transmission and this is normal behavior for a computer controlled CVT, to let it rev higher when under a load such as driving up a hill.



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