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6

It will not damage the engine at all. All that will happen is that it will run richer, thus using more fuel. If you did it for thousands of miles you'd probably end up with more deposits in the engine/exhaust, but even that is easy to sort.


6

The only type of vehicle you need wait on is a diesel powered one. The reason for that is you need to wait (in most of them) for the glow plugs to heat the combustion chamber. Modern fuel injected cars will keep their fuel pressure after shutdown. It will stay there (usually) for a good 24 hours (Note: 24 hours is an approximation. It will take longer in ...


5

While most new electronically controlled vehicles probably do have a rev-limiter built in, this doesn't mean you cannot go past the red-line of the engine. The red-line is the theoretical maximum you ever want your engine to run at and is the limit at which your engine is designed to work. Beyond this point one of the first bad things which occur is called ...


5

The RPM's would certainly increase but the mechanical components would be prevented from exceeding maximum RPM's by a rev-limiter. Rev-limiters are built into the ECU (computer) of the car. When an engine is spinning at it's maximum RPM set by the manufacturer the ECU will not send a spark to particular cylinders to prevent the engine from spinning faster ...


5

It's certainly not recommended, but I don't think it will ruin it, as long as you don't leave it in for too long... Flush the coolant system thoroughly to get rid of all traces of contaminants, and refill with proper coolant - it might be worth then doing another flush a few days later if you're worried.


3

You would need a heavier flywheel. If you idle too low, your flywheel doesn't have enough momentum to keep the engine running smoothly. A heavier flywheel will remedy that.


3

The issue with low idle is more significant when viewed from the perspective of oil pressure. Reducing the idle, albeit a noble cause of saving the planet, reduces overall emissions insignificantly when compared to the implosion of an engine. The carbon footprint related to throwing a rod and having processed oil spill out over an open uncontrolled surface ...


3

Jetting a carburator - short answer You will require two things, probably. A size larger mainjet An adjustable needle jet Your main jet sits in the floatbowl, it's number 11. Off idle and higher the main jet contributes more and more to air fuel mixture as you open the throttle to wide open where the main jet is 99% of your fuel delivery. The ...


3

The main difference between an air compressor and an internal combustion engine is the compressor doesn't have the heat/detonation phase which an engine does. This actually helps keep it cleaner than what you'd think. (So people don't think I'm crazy, an internal combustion engine and a compressor are both just air movers ... they just accomplish it a little ...


2

My first thought, having owned 3 Opels/Vauxhalls (including two Corsas), is the coil pack. When it starts to die, you get the symptoms you are describing. Your #2 cylinder's spark plug isn't firing properly, so under load conditions the spark may be too weak to ignite the air/fuel mix, causing a misfire. If I'm right, the problem should get progressively ...


2

As stated in the comments, it's a lot cheaper to remove excess weight. If you use this car as a daily drive it's best to keep stuff like a spare tire and jack in your car.. Start with the easy stuff: a lot of people have a lot of stuff in their car that they'll never need. If you want to make the car even more lighter, you could opt to remove the rear seat ...


2

Electrolysis happens over time, and will not cause any damage over an 80 mile trip. People (wrongly) have used straight water in their radiator over the summer months thinking that's all they need and don't have issues until many years down the road. If you didn't worry about it and never changed it again, it would be an issue. Changing it out after an 80 ...


2

It sounds as though the rear-end is too tight. There is a straight rod which runs through the back of the bike which holds the rear-end together. You can see it in the circled in this picture: If this isn't torqued correctly, it will cause drag on the rear end. Sounds like your's is torqued too much. Another area to look at is to see if the rear brakes ...


2

tl dr - Upgrade to a 2500 or 2500HD pick-up. There are several issues you'll notice when hauling at the maximum and over the maximum of the towing capacity of the Avalanche. First off, the 2007 & 2008 MYs came with the 4L60e transmission. Why GM ever put these in a pickup truck is beside me. These were meant to go into passenger cars. While they are ...


2

The 'worst case scenario' that I can think of is this. Your spark plugs become fouled because the motor ran too rich and the bike doesn't start. You would need to remove the spark plugs and clean them with a carb or brake cleaner and re-install them. Don't worry about your vehicle. It's fine.


2

Yes, it's serious. It's usually either because your MAF sensor is dirty, or one or more fuel injectors aren't working properly. Check out this link. You should still be able to drive a car that's running too lean, but you should never, under any circumstances drive it fast or put it under heavy load. From the link Causes A code P0171 may mean that one ...


2

I think @Zaid is correct on the first one (A/C). The second one, however, I believe is actually the Power Steering Pressure Sensor (PSPS) Connector, which uses the same pig tail as the injector harness, but would account for the good running engine. (Motorcraft part number WPT372) EDIT: Looking at the new pictures, it appears the upper pulley replaces an ...


2

Given its proximity to the AC compressor, the one to the left appears to be the wire for the AC compressor clutch; the connector looks similar to the one for a brand-new replacement: I'm speculating that the one on the right side of the picture is a fuel injector connector, a clearer picture from a different angle would help:


1

In case you had the engine off while the fans were on, your car was in the "ON" state, which powers all the electric systems of your car. The fans were consuming most of the power which have drained the battery very quickly. You've started your car right on time to retain just as less energy as was needed to get your engine running again. The smell you ...


1

First of all This is not a problem with your vehicle its general physics and applies to all vehicles When your vehicle is in neutral there is no load on the drive train thus allowing the RPMs to reach its limiter easily, when you are in gear , the drive train has an opposing force of the road which is working in the opposite direction thus restricting the ...


1

This is not a problem. This is perfectly normal. Unless your car has immense power, you will need low gears to climb steep inclines. The higher the gear, the lower the effective torque available for acceleration. This is part of the trade-off gears give you: Low gears give you acceleration/torque so you can pull away from a stationary start and tow loads ...


1

Having a lean condition isn't good for the motor. Lean is higher oxygen and lower fuel. Oxygen burns hotter than fuel. Being lean is to have a condition where the fire in your engine is hotter. The results are increased wear on valves and potentially melting the aluminum of the head. The melting is under extreme conditions. You are in a situation where ...


1

The engine not turning over is related to your starter circuit or your starter relay. If you have a good battery and your relay is functioning, you will here a clicking sound as you turn the ignition key to try and start the car. The power windows and radio have their own circuits, typically dedicated to the use. Radio, circuit, window circuit, lights, ...


1

If you are checking on time, so the oil is low, but not too low, there should be no adverse effects on the engine - the 'min' mark on the dipstick marks the lowest you should ever let it go. There is nothing wrong with topping it up too early - better early than late. Remember to only top it up to the 'max' line, don't put too much in! If you did let it ...


1

The majority of the damage is more than likely in the bottom end of the motor. Bottom end components such as plain bearings for the connecting rods and the crankshaft main bearings are more than likely absolutely destroyed. Plain bearings rely on oil pressure to push oil in between the journal and the plain bearing creating situation called hydrodynamic ...


1

Clear the continuous diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs) and reset the emission monitors information in the powertrain control module (PCM) was previously called PCM reset. All professional OBD scan tools and some consumer code readers support the clearing of continuous DTCs and resetting of emission monitors information in the PCM. Clearing the continuous ...


1

It clarifies half way through the article, stating "He clarified that Euro 4 fuel could still be loaded in old vehicles." (the "He" being Environment Secretary Ramon Paje). I don't think you'll have an issue.


1

I would assume that's the security check light. Not sure what caused your issues to start with (other than a dead battery), but sounds like the car has lost track of the key(s) and now is in 'secure' mode. You'll probably have to have a Ford tech look at it with a scanner to figure out what the problem is and how to fix.


1

You need to make sure the relay is the correct one for that circuit. There are several relays in the fuse/relay panel and while they can be moved to another circuit, they may not have the amperage capacity to handle the load, and they will overheat and fail. For instance the headlight relay is the same configuration, and it will plug into the EFI relay spot, ...


1

Suzuki built two stroke gasoline motorcycle engines in the 1960's, 1970's which were every bit as durable as the four stroke motorcycle engines of similar displacement being offered at the time. Suzuki built a water cooler 3 cylinder 750cc two stroke motorcycle which a service life of over 100,000 miles without rebuild was not unheard of. I have one of these ...



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