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11

I have both a 2004 Bora TDI (Jetta Mk4 in the US) and a 2012 Mk6 TDI Golf. When either of these cars requires it's warm up system, it will automatically switch it on for the time it needs. This is signified by the glow plug light illumination on the dashboard: Once it's up to the temperature it requires, the light goes out and the car can be started. I ...


7

Tyre depth gauges look something like this (amazon link) - you can buy them in any automotive store. You press the green bit against the tyre and push the middle bit into the tread groove. The slidy bit at the top will then tell you the depth. Buy one and have a play, it's easier to see than to explain! You should be able to see the 'wear bars' - raised ...


7

The below are very easy checks you can do while buying a used car.(from anywhere for that matter of fact) Engine This is the most complicated/expensive part to maintain/replace. Head Gasket check: Open the oil filler cap or the dip stick for any milky white substance , like mayoneese ,if it is present then stay away , it means the head gasket is ...


7

For most practical purposes, it's done for cosmetic reasons. One might prefer to use black over silver for better heat dissipation but the motivation is almost always going to be to enhance appearance. In cast iron blocks, the paint can act as a means of rust prevention.


5

I would like to add two valid points to this discussion as well: 1) When producing engines like this which produce more power with lower CC's, they won't be as smooth as their bigger naturally aspirated predecessors. They will have to rev higher just to produce the same power. So lets say you are driving at 70 MPH with a 5.0 V8, you could comfortably ...


5

Under normal use (non-performance type use), the valves, both intake and exhaust, should last the life of the engine. If and when they do leak, it will not take long for the valve to become a burnt valve. In your case, I doubt they were leaking prior to pulling everything apart. If the exhaust valves had leaked, they would have been fried. If valves do not ...


4

Think of stalling an engine as lugging it once. While not good for your engine/car, it won't do the same damage which is possible with lugging your engine. Stalling the engine is basically the engine not having the torque to overcome the demand which has been put on it. As far as lugging damage, check this answer. Lugging an engine can cause real damage.


4

It sounds as though you did suck up some water and were on the verge of hydrolock, but didn't quite get there. I also doubt you have caused any damage to the engine, in fact, you may have inadvertently helped your engine (though I wouldn't suggest you do this again!!!). The extra sputtering may have been a case of the filter on your CAI getting soaked with ...


4

Bad coils are just one of many things that could be to blame. I'd say stop changing coils. It is highly unlikely that they were the root cause of the problem to begin with. The symptoms provided are consistent with a misfiring engine. This usually means that there is an issue with the mixture of air and fuel reaching the engine (more on that in a bit). So ...


4

I think the overheating episode did a permanent damage to your car. A gasket could have cracked or the head could have warped or even cracked, thus allowing water into the engine itself. Too much heat in an engine can cause serious problems because heat causes metal to expand. The hotter the engine gets, the tighter clearances become until there are ...


3

It means that your camshaft position sensor or crank angle sensor is faulty. Either because they are actually faulty, or there is a wiring problem. Clearing the code won't do much. The symptoms of a bad cam or crank sensor are usually rough idling, difficulty starting and misfiring. Which makes sense, because your ECU gets wrong information regarding the ...


3

Classic fuel starvation, probably caused by an old, gummed up fuel filter. Replace the fuel filter and purge the injectors (remove them from the head, crank the engine a few times and clean the injectors thoroughly). If this doesn't solve things get the fault codes read as it could be something like a problem with the injector loom.


3

I don't think you replaced the injectors. I think you replaced the spark plugs. Injectors are what spray gas into the combustion chamber, and those are usually replaced or cleaned on older cars. You said it happened right after the spark plugs were replaced. Why not replace them again? They might be the wrong spark plugs, they might have the wrong spark ...


3

I'm betting your Jag is Drive-By-Wire (DBW), meaning, there isn't a direct connection between you and the throttle. If so, the gas pedal rheostat is probably telling the computer you are pressing it, causing the throttle to go up. You could possibly test the gas pedal by unplugging it and checking for even/smooth operation by putting an ohmmeter on the ...


3

A stress riser (also known as a stress concentration or stress raiser is so called because there is more stress in one area which can cause fatigue cracks and ultimately cause part failure. This can happen in any part in the engine, but some parts are more prone to stress than others, so would suffer sooner. A stress riser can occur anywhere stress is ...


3

It is mainly for aesthetics. Something else it can do for you is to allow you to see when you have a leak. I've seen blocks painted white for this reason. Something you didn't mention was whether you are talking about painting the outside or the inside of the engine. If done right, painting the inside of the engine can result in oil returning faster to ...


2

I don't know about material showing the difference, but the explanation is pretty easy: an interference motor has pistons and valves which share the same space within the engine at different times - if the cam/valve timing gets interrupted for any reason, damage between cam and valve may occur; the non-interference (or free running) motor does not have ...


2

Rings generally wear at the same rate meaning that when it's time to replace one you should be replacing them all as they're not seating with the cylinder properly any more. Burning oil does not always imply a loss of compression. Cars with good rings will burn oil due to bad valve guides or bad valve guide seals. A compression test should help you ...


2

Well if you know the oil is leaking from the bolt on the pan I'd say you obviously don't have a good seal. I would re thread the hole and replace the washer and bolt. I stripped the oil pan bolt on my Yamaha R6 a while back. With a little bit of trial and error I discovered that it was a 14mm 1.25 thread so I picked up a 14mm 1.5 thread tap at Autozone, ...


2

Your engine was designed in such a way that it is most efficient between 3500RPM and 5000RPM. That means that the valve timing and camshaft profiles were made in such a way that your engine "breathes" best between those speeds. That's why you have the most torque in that region. Another thing is that as the RPM increases, it gets harder and harder to get the ...


2

There are various reasons as to why an engine is not efficient beyond its tuned range. Laws of thermodynamics, I do not want to get into scientific details but it simply means that you cannot transfer heat and convert it into energy efficiently beyond a certain point where the ambient temperature and cylinder pressure start to make more impact. Geometry of ...


2

This is true if there is a vacuum leak in the braking system, if that is what you are asking. You should be able to run the engine so there is a vacuum draw at the assist canister. You can either have a gauge on this to check for vacuum (exact measurement), or you could pull the vacuum line between the check valve and the vacuum assist canister and listen ...


2

If I had to choose, I'd say hot weather is easier on a car's longevity than is cold weather. Here is my reasoning: Hot weather: Breaks fluids down faster Keep an eye on engine oil/coolant levels. Maintain fluid more often (change oil/coolant sooner) Tires wear out faster Hot asphalt tears up the tread faster (higher temp rated tires are needed here) ...


2

Are you sure you replaced the #5 coil? It should be the front driver's side. If you did, you might have gotten a bad coil. Another thing to try is to swap out the new coil with a different coil and see if the problem worsens or follows where you put the new coil. You could also do this with the old coil to see if the problem follows the coil or if it ...


2

I think your idea you are having a major carbon buildup is a good theory. You can try and get rid of the carbon by doing a Seafoam treatment. You mentioned are in the process of running a bottle of Techron through it. While this will help if you are using it all the time, it won't do much for a huge carbon buildup. Also, I believe you have carbon buildup in ...


1

Refuse to pay - they're trying to coerce you to use their services... On most cars, removing the cam cover is a 5 minute operation, and replacing it would be similar. Even a really complicated one isn't going to take more than half an hour, unless loads of stuff needs to be removed to get to it. I'd therefore consider 1-2 hours labour (at however much your ...


1

Diesels have never absolutely needed it - even on older diesels, they'd still usually start without waiting for the glow plugs. However it does make it very much easier for the engine, so starting will be easier in adverse conditions (cold/altitude) where otherwise the engine might not catch. Also you'll find the engine runs rough for a few seconds until ...


1

I suspect issues in two components of your car but since you have already mentioned that Honda people have had a look not 100% sure. Clogged up Intake: I know it sounds very trivial but a clogged up intake is sometimes overlooked. Faulty EGR system: Almost al of the symptoms you suggest are very much mimicking the symptoms for a faulty EGR valve here are ...


1

This answer is a bit hypothetical; please take it as one path to follow, that may be useful in this and other, similar, cases. Perhaps the clue to the problem is not in the spark plug (or injector?) replacement, but rather in this part: "I had a engine tune up". While we do not know if the OP had this performed at an official garage, if this was the case ...


1

Running at low revs "lugging" is not really damaging provided you have appropriate oil pressure, but I'd question the mileage gained by it, modern ECU's will provide appropriate fuel and may run richer trying to raise these speed when you're trying to accelerate from an already high gear. Modern engines are far more tolerant than engines of decades past and ...



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