Hot answers tagged

39

That sounds very risky to me. The portions of the plugs that reside in the combustion chamber are designed to tolerate the heat and pressure there. I don't think they will melt. So what will happen is that those parts are likely to remain in the cylinder and may get caught between the top of the piston and the head and/or valves. That is likely to do more ...


29

Do NOT drive a car with a piece of sparkplug inside the engine. It can (and likely will) lead to serious damage (up to a catastrophic engine failure). Get your car towed to a service and have the pieces of the broken plug removed. Additionally, get the oil changed (probably with a flush too, to remove all the debris). You will have to spend some money on ...


22

That's a nice car - don't be a consumer and break it because you're too lazy to fix it properly. Sadly the "proper" fix is to tow it to your mechanic, who will take the head off and fish out the broken pieces. He'll also check the head and valves for damage while its off, and make a recommendation. An old engine idling at low speed might happily burp out ...


16

If this happened during a plug change If you have roadside assistance/towing, I would highly recommend getting it towed home, then purchase a cheap USB inspection camera or a inspection unit like this one from Harbor Freight and look inside the spark plug hole to see if there is any remnants of the plug and any trauma to the exhaust value. If it ...


15

The Wikipedia article on VTEC should be good at helping you understand it all. VTEC is a trademark of Honda's patented technology (the original patents have expired but Honda have patented newer implementations such as A-VTEC). So no other manufacturer's production engine can do exactly the same thing. However, that doesn't mean they can't be similar. This ...


14

There are multiple firing orders for some engine configurations, especially in the V8 realm. A Ford smallblock fires 1-5-4-8-6-3-7-2, while the same displacement modern modular Ford V8 fires 1-5-4-8-7-2-6-3. There's a huge wiki about Firing Order which contains a vast number of workable arrangements, even across the exact same cylinder configuration. To ...


14

As you saw with your test, it is possible to disconnect the ignition on two pistons and still have the engine run. The vibrations have nothing to do with engine knock or detonation though. The reason it stumbles is because those disabled pistons were expected to sustain the crank's rotation. In the absence of those pistons firing, the crank will experience ...


13

The benefits of changing it hot are the that oil is less viscous, so it flows better, allowing more of the old oil to drain. It will also drain more quickly. I know when I do mine, I let the engine warm up, but not to full operating temperature. Even through latex gloves, full temp oil would burn my hand, and I can do with that. And getting it at least ...


12

VTEC is what Honda are calling their implementation of variable valve timing. Each manufacturer has their own version of it, each with their own name. See here for a list. So, you are right in saying only Honda's have VTEC. But other makes have a system doing essentially the same thing, they just call it something else.


11

Firing order is constrained by: crankshaft geometry piston arrangement (inline, V, VR, flat, etc.) These two factors will combine to determine when top-dead center (TDC) of each cylinder is achieved with respect to crank angle. Ideally, the firing order is set up to make the ignition occur as regularly as possible. Inline-four example Here is an ...


11

It depends if you are asking from the point of view of an engine designer or someone trying to maintain or troubleshoot an engine. From the point of view of a mechanic firing order tells you the order in which the cylinders are ready to fire – when each one is on its compression stroke with the valves closed and a charge of fuel. That's important if you're ...


8

This is what I can think of, in my limited knowledge. Overlaps with some existing answers. Trying to limit to things that aren't obvious, also trying to think of direct physical causes rather than things that may or may not trigger certain ECU software to make an explicit shutdown decision (I assume there's a lot of variation here, so it's kinda hard to ...


8

No question - running the engine will break it. If you're "unlucky", there's enough clearance between the piston and the valves to fit the spark plug. In that case you'll have the spark plug rattling around inside the cylinder. In approximate order, this will first destroy the valves which will not seal properly when their edges and seat faces get damaged,...


7

This looks like your first posting with Motor Vehicle maintenance and repair site. It looks like you are an engineering student, looking at a possible school project. Is that right? Welcome to the stackexchange! You have a whole lot of decisions to make. First Choice: Type of engine? I'm going to assume you want an internal combustion engine. ...


7

It is absolutely possible to tell if an engine is unhealthy by the noise it makes. In many failures, an engine will start to emit unusual noises before any fault codes or warning lights are displayed. Additionally, certain ancillary equipment such as alternators can give out audible indications that it's failing. I suppose it would be possible to use the ...


7

tl;dr: it's really called a coolant flange. I had also never heard of a coolant flange but it turns out that it's a real part and, based on the video, it's a part that fails around 120K miles (which sounds reasonable for the age of your vehicle. An example of a coolant flange repair. Some examples of coolant flanges (which seem to be common for Audis and ...


7

As @rpmerf says, virtually all piston engines have at least one cylinder head. Most engines will have one head per bank of cylinders, as you suggest, though some have more - IIRC some of the aircooled VW engines had one head per cylinder. There are however some that don't have any - in opposed-piston engines, such as the two-stroke Napier Deltic and the ...


7

That's the check engine light, or CEL - if it lights up, you have a problem with the engine and should stop and investigate it. If it's blinking, count the number of flashes, as this will indicate a particular error code which can help you to determine what is wrong.


6

All piston engines must have a cylinder head. The head is on top of the block and forms the top of the combustion chamber. The head is also where the valves are. The valves and chambers in the head allow air/fuel to enter the combustion chamber and exhaust to leave the combustion chamber. The head is removable to allow for assembly and maintenance.


6

No problem doing it cold, but better to do it hot so the oil flows easier. Proper tools will help, and so will experience. I've been burned a lot too, but that's because I'm not very adept, and have worked in "quick lube" environments where the customer is in the waiting room after coming off the highway, and I did not have the luxury of any cool-down time....


6

The other holes are to allow coolant and/or oil to flow through the cylinder head and engine block. The coolant is needed to help cool down the combustion chamber. Here is an example of a Chrysler engine block with coolant holes. On overhead cam engines the camshafts require oil for lubricating the journal bearings that they spin on.


6

Yes, debris will cause damage, however the valves cover gasket doesn't stick that hard and if it is the original, they come with some kind of rubber material, very easy to take out even in one piece almost always. Some gaskets are made of cork material, those would break but still won't generate much debris neither. The tip is: take time, warm up the engine ...


5

The simplest way of explaining it would be to say primary, first-order, balance is related to things that vibrate the engine at a frequency equal to the engine speed (e.g., 1000 Hz at 1000 RPM). Secondary, second-order, balance is related to things that have a frequency of twice the engine speed and so on. In common usage, primary usually refers to ...


5

I finally got a chance to investigate more and figured it out. After letting it cool during the initial trip, I was able to check the coolant, and it was bone dry. I added about 3.2 liters to the 3.3 liter capacity radiator. I noticed the seal of the reserve tank was damaged, and the radiator cap seal was falling apart as well. I refilled the radiator and ...


5

The last line of your question "Are there existing technologies that are originally from other manufacturers?" depends on your definition of VTEC. VTEC gives you the "kick" as the camshaft profile changes. To understand the reason for this, you have to look at the difference between high performance race engines and those used in road cars. Typically a ...


4

I used to do this with my Ford Fiesta and Puma - it's all about fuel. When the ignition key is turned on, the fuel pump runs for a few seconds, then shuts off. This ensures there is enough fuel pressure in the rail to start (since a richer mixture is required to start when cold). The Puma did not like me turning the key straight to START without waiting for ...


4

If you are only talking about the combustion chamber, by far the most used material is aluminum. The combustion chamber is part of the head. It is just the indentation where the valves reside. The combustion chamber affects flame propagation. In the past, besides aluminum, cast iron was used as head material. Cast iron, while being more resilient than ...


4

So you stripped everything down and now don't know how to get them back..? Okay, once you fit your carb on the engine, you'll have a angled rubber tube (manifold) between a cylinder head and carburetor. On the side of that manifold should be a little fitting for a hose pipe. That hose pipe is sending a vacuum from manifold to a fuel pump that is located ...


4

Think of a cup with sediment (dirt, sand). If you shake it up real good, then dump it out, you will get most everything out. If you let it sit overnight, the dirt and sand settle to the bottom. When you go to dump it out, you dump mostly water, and most of the sediment is still at the bottom of the cup. Your oil is similar with the gunk you are trying to ...


4

I don't see how leaving an A/C on would contribute to longer cranking, since most if not all modern vehicles will disable auxiliaries (e.g. A/C blower fan, radio) during cranking. A longer crank is usually a telltale sign of lack of sufficient charge from the battery. If your battery hasn't been replaced in a while it would be a prime suspect for what you'...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible