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hi my name is jack and i live in england. i have a car which got blown up the other day it was due to the failure in the body control module. it was good because my wife was in the car. im so glad that she is now dead i hated her and i just wanted to kill her and now shes finally dead.


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The magnets on your stator actually unglued from the rotor. You should be able to remove them by hand. I think this is a known problem on dl1000, although i never had this problem with my k2 (yet). I don't know if they can be glued back, but you can buy a new rotor for sure.


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Don't go with that model for automotive use. It passes through the "12v" input directly to the motherboard and drives, meaning you'll be delivering ~14v with the engine running, and all sorts of ugly voltages during cranking, near-stall, etc. situations. I would highly recommend this more expensive model: ...


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Before changing any expensive parts on the Golf, check the brake light switches, very carefully. There are two switches on the vehicle activated by the brake pedal. Whilst the Golf is a very good example of European vehicle manufacture, its brake light switches could be thought of as flimsy. They do miss behave and fail, producing various side effects.


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The Mk5 has a Central Control Module (I also saw it was called a Central Convenience Module). The CCM controls the brake lights, as well as many other things. If the brakes lights are coming on weirdly of their own accord, it's probably due to the CCM. I believe the only way to fix it is to replace it, which seems to have happened to many Golf owners. I ...


2

Just replace the injector plug. I believe it should look like this: You can order it from RockAuto.com for ~$6 (I'm sure you can get it from many other places as well. I would soldier this in place using heat shrink to seal them up. As far as the gaskets go, your vehicle uses the gaskets with the rubber-ish sealing portion (don't know what they are made ...


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As long as the battery is good (and no indication at this point that it isn't), the issue you have is in there is a grounding issue which is keeping the power from your battery to your starter. This is most likely caused in the wire going from your battery to your starter, your battery to ground, or both. You can do some things to try and see where the ...


4

Do you have a Pulsar 220? If so, you probably don't want two full-blown headlights, if the electrical system on a 220 is anything like that of the 135LS. On my bike, the electricals can barely keep up with all the lights on, plus both signal lights blinking (unless I raise the idling speed). You should probably look into adding accessory lights, instead. ...


2

Remove and clean both of your battery cables and posts, put them back on nice and tight. If that doesn't fix the problem, start checking the main ground wires from the battery. You likely have a poor connection at one of those places.


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First thing is to check the Battery, see my post here. Provided your battery is good, the following will let you know about the alternator. Start the vehicle and let it idle. The voltage should be about 2 volts above open circuit voltage. You can also do a loaded voltage output test. Turn on the high beam headlamps, AC on high, rear defogger etc. Bring ...


2

If you'd like to see if your alternator is working, first you need to know what your battery is reading with the engine off. Put your multi-meter on vdc reading and test your battery. It should be about 12.6vdc if in good shape. Next start your engine. Your reading at the battery should be somewhere around 13.1-13.6vdc. It may even be a bit higher than that ...


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You're measuring voltage. Idle could be related to the battery as well, since the battery might be lacking. Post results once you've found out. If it's not (from memory) around 12 or higher, then it's slowly degrading. Charging it does fix it temporarily, but it will die out eventually.


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I would go with the more expensive one in this case. Typical output of a "good" system is in the neighborhood of 13.1vdc. Depending on the alternator and how much it needs to put out to recharge the battery, it could be upwards of 14vdc (or maybe a touch higher). The power output from the 12v outlet source is going to reflect what the alternator is putting ...


3

The voltage available on the "Accessory" circuits on some modern (last 10 years, at least) can be pretty stable at 12-12.5V. Ignition circuits, not so much (9-14V). To be safe, however, you should measure with a fast acting (ie, analog) voltmeter on the cigarette lighter in the following conditions: Key on, engine off Key on, engine cranking (likely it's ...


1

Your Monte Carlo has two separate fuse blocks. One inside the cabin of the car and one under the hood. If you pop your hood, you should see something which looks like this: In the picture, the relays are going to be under the left side panel. They are the three which are lined up on the right side of that block (this is relative to the picture ... orient ...


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Running without an exhaust will cause the bike to run a little leaner. if its already lean you may be overheating the engine (correct air/fuel mix also cools the cylinders) which in turn will affect the oil which will also affect the engine. Watery oil to me means one thing, its broken down so is thinner than it should be and not lubricating how it should. ...


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Check to make sure that the wires on your starter are tight. Also a bad ground can cause that to happen. I experienced something very similar in my Ford pickup. It ended up being the starter relay. It was bad and dragging. This was causing a dead short. My headlights were dimming when I turned the heater on though. Also a also if the relay is going bad it ...


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The first thing I think of when I hear 'watery oil' is a bad head gasket. That could cause a lot of the issues you are experiencing. we have escaped like noise from the motor Can you explain what that means? I wonder if it could be something simple like an oil change, all fluids or maybe even needs more water. It might be a good idea to change ...


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Did you check the voltage at the battery when this is going on? If not, pull out a multi-meter and see what the voltage is at the battery. It should read somewhere between 13-14vdc. Do this directly at your battery posts and not off on some other ground/power source. If your charging looks good, the issue, I think would point at the gauge being the issue. It ...


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Yes, something else happened which explains why the truck doesn't work. The truck didn't crank because the ALT-A (80-AMP) fuse tripped. I replaced the 80-AMP fuse as well as other fuses that also blew. After replacing the fuses, the truck cranked, the interior lights burned, the radio played, and the windows rolled. Cross connecting battery cables to a ...


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IMHO, O2 sensor can't cause damage. If signal is faulty - ECU must be working in safe mode. That is why your check engine lamp was light on. But if you have bad high voltage wires (plugs - coil) then high voltage jumps through any weak points and can damage and even solder parts. It also can damage ECU and its electronic parts like condensers. I suggest ...



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