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9

It should hold up. It melts at around twice the temperature where water boils, which I don't think you'll ever experience in the engine bay (unless it's touching the exhaust). But the greasiness in the engine may make for a poor adhesion. BTW: I am one of those people who would rather crimp than solder.


5

No, you don't have to rely on wire colors to figure out what's what. With nothing more than a decent multimeter and premix flame (blowtorch or gas stove), a two-test sequence can reveal the identity of each wire, assuming the O2 sensor is fully-functional: Determine the heater wires This should be done first. These wires serve to heat up the O2 sensor ...


3

A fuse blowing indicates something is wrong. This could of course be a transient that just requires a fuse replacement or a trip reset, but what if it's something more serious, like a short allowing high current to flow through sensitive components, or to ignite something flammable? Or an indication of failure of an expensive part. A self resetting trip ...


3

When you first turn your vehicle on, the vehicle itself does a "Power On Self Test" or POST. When you turn your key from off to the run position (before you start it up), all of the dash lights which are usable will light up. You should get used to which ones light up and keep those in the back of your memory. If a bulb should go out, you'll notice the ...


3

Check your coolant level and keep an eye on your temperature gauge. A car will run fine with an overheating engine right up to the point when the engine seizes.


2

Since it is occurring on both sides with the same result, your problem lies with the switch on the column. There is an outside chance that the wiring harness connection which attaches to the switch might need reseated, so you could attempt that as well.


2

Solder (60/40) or any other lead-based sort has little mechanical strength. And it decreases as heat goes up. Furthermore, some of the wires used in various places don't work very well with field soldering (such as Litz wire). On the other hand many of them don't work well with mechanical fastening, ie, crimping. Depending on the wires you're working with, ...


2

It sounds as though it is one or two things going on here. First of all, did you check the serpentine belt which drives the alternator? Is it still on there and looking ready to do its thing? If that is still there, it could very well be the alternator itself. I've had alternators which have completely froze up. From your description, this could very well ...


2

First of all, eliminate everything else of the final things you pulled prior to assuming it's the solenoid on the starter, but I think you are onto it with the starter. You would have all of these symptoms with a starter motor which is engaged all the time. I'd suggest you are going to end up replacing the starter anyway ... the drive to the mechanic if only ...


1

Yes it will be fine...if you correctly solder it. If you dont know how to solder then i would suggest a crimp.


1

Electric cars use high tech lithium batteries. These batteries are dangerous in a variety of situations but they're also full of electronics to compensate. If anything at all bad happens (for example, a short circuit due to water) the battery itself will shut down, and you'll have to get the car towed. Cars are expected to handle all kinds of weather and ...



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