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17

Fuses do not need to be replaced unless they have blown, so it's not a regular maintenance thing. In terms of checking them, depending on your vehicle, many only require a visual check to see if the metal is present or missing. If you do have fuses where their status is not obvious, a good multimeter is only a few dollars (probably cheaper than replacing ...


9

As a general maintenance practice or a troubleshooting method without having a particular reasoned approach, no. If it's troubleshooting, testing the fuses on their exposed blade tips is equivalent. That said, replacing the fuses shouldn't create any risks so long as you're replacing them with the appropriate values. It should be pointed out that fuses ...


7

According to this that extra space is for the integrated fog light, which is probably where the fog light would be if you didn't have the separate fog light.


6

Replace them all? No. As others have mentioned, they're either working or they're not. Test them with a multimeter or fuse tester. Be sure to look for "fusible links" in the wiring on a newer car, not all fuses are in the fuse box anymore for some unfathomable reason... Take them all out, one at a time, and clean them? I've had that help on some ...


4

The head unit will supply enough power to the stock speakers. You will not need to amplify the signal. Doing so will likely blow the speakers. If you replace your stock speakers with higher wattage speakers, you may need an amp with the channels to power these. A one or two channel (bridgeable) amp is sufficient for the subwoofer(s). When I had a system, ...


4

AKA Trembler Coil The trembler coil was a device called a Ruhmkorff or induction coil, widely used in the 19th century.[3] It combines two magnetic devices on the same iron-cored solenoid. The first is a transformer, used to transform low voltage electricity to a high voltage, suitable for an engine's spark plug. Two coils of wire are wound around an ...


4

Generally manufacturers aren't going to waste money on unnecessary components. You've got electrical components to: provide spark to the engine. an on/ off / kill switch to control engine on or off. power the fuel pump (on a modern fuel injected bike). power to the engine control computer, and its sensors and subsequently the fuel injectors (on a modern ...


3

The thirty amp fuse is your main fuse To ensure we are speaking using the same nomenclature, K1 is referring to model year 2001 in my verbiage. This 30 amp fuse supplies all the power to your fuse block with various 5, 10 and 20 amp fuses populated. I have quite a few hours on this bike and have seen a scenario that you are describing. Here are some ...


3

Just to post the OP's answer to get this closed out: "I just got a new battery a few months ago took the jeep up to napa they tested it n its a bad alternator."


3

Based on the symptoms, I'm going to guess that it might be a problem with the temperature sensor. What is supposed to happen is that the engine control unit (ECU) gets a signal from the engine coolant temperature sensor to tell when the engine is warm. When it's warm, the ECU knows to lean out the fuel mixture. What I suspect might be happening is that ...


3

This shouldn't be too crazy. You will probably need a multimeter to test things. (If you watch the specials carefully, there is at least one tool outlet that gives these away as special coupon deals..) I would start the journey with the service manual. It's available here. Check out section #6, electrical. Your system is pretty simple. A couple of ...


3

Theory 1 From your wiring diagram the horn relay has only 3 contacts; 12v, horn, button. This layout dictates that the horn button should ground the horn relay and not send it 12v. This is because the horn relay does not have it's own ground. Sending the relay power may cause things to behave strangely. Theory 2 The sending unit is a very old style. ...


3

According to the wiring diagram the power is supplied to the bulbs through the relay and then one fuse for each bulb. If the high beams work then the relay and fuses are working. The lights are controlled by the light switch by switching the ground side of the circuit. The high and low beam filaments are selected by this switch. If one set of the filaments ...


2

A battery can run lights but not have enough energy to run a starter, Check the battery connections, be sure they are clean and tight. Check water levels in the battery, fill if needed, then put a 1amp charger on it for a few hours. If you get it running again check the voltage at the battery while running with a DC voltmeter, it should be 13.5 volts or ...


2

Use a voltmeter and trace the circuit for 12v from the battery to the starter, you will find where the voltage drops off. Also trace it to and from the starter switch/button to the starter relay, check all circuits involved.


1

Have you checked the battery condition? Your local motor parts supplier should be able to test it for you, and replace it if it's failed. As a guide, batteries usually last 5-8 years, so if it's in that range or older, you'll probably need to replace it. Also check the condition of the connections to the battery terminals, and the condition of the ...


1

It takes three things to make an engine go. Spark, fuel and air. So perhaps something controlling each of those three things isn't working well. No way to guess here. Just start checking each of those. If you are mechanically inclined, I'd start the search by troubleshooting with the service manual. Page 13 of that manual is a very detail troubleshooting ...


1

Some cars have timers that keep the lights on for so many seconds after you close the door, this is done with an electronic timer and the timer may not be compatible with led's, leaking voltage. Only solution is to locate the timer and wiring diagram for it and bypass the timer, this would require some skill.


1

Definitely sounds like a sensor problem. ~Random stalling is often caused by a bad crankshaft or camshaft sensor as the ECU thinks there is a mechanical problem and puts the engine into a safe mode or loses track doesn't have enough information to properly control functions like automatic choke or anti-stall. As already mentioned this could also be a ...


1

If you've established that you're not getting a spark at the plugs, the next thing to do would be to work back - so test the coil packs. Pull out the plug from one of the coil packs and see if it is getting power, has a good ground, and has some kind of signal coming from the ECU. If it does, chances are it's the coil pack itself that's failed (though both ...


1

I have a 2000 Toyota Camry, and if I'm not mistaken the drivers window control setup is very much the same as on your car. Some things you can rule out: It's not the window or the wiring to the window because the old switch still works. It's not just the aftermarket part because the new OEM part does it too. Here is something you can try. The ...


1

My suggestion is to check the fuse first...it's fuse #14 for low beams. If it "pops" out then you will have no low beams. Same for high beams. The two have two different fuses.



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