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16

It's one of the Heated Windscreen connectors. They have a reputation for breaking off on the Ford Focus, because the wipers hit them if they're not routed correctly. It's common for replacement glass companies to not notice that the car has a heated screen, so don't spend any money fixing it until you've confirmed that it still has a heated screen. This ...


9

It wouldn't be the fuse which is causing the power drain, but the circuit the fuse is there to protect. (This is the reason why the copied area you have posted has 5 "Not Helpful" votes against it.) The fuse is only a conduit. It transmits electricity. When the circuit transmits too much electricity, the fuse heats up, then "pops", not allowing anymore ...


8

That looks like a flex connector that has broken off. Perhaps part of a windscreen heater? Labone Heated Screen Connectors


6

If the fuse is blowing as soon as you perform an action it's a short to ground. Multimeter won't do much good in this situation. It'll come down to wiring diagrams and visual inspection of the harness and connectors on the circuit. Unless you have a fancy tool that will find the short for you. It looks like fuse 21 powers a bunch of stuff, but since the ...


5

On most (all) modern cars there will be a small drain while the car is off. Some of the causes are: Clock Alarm Keyless entry system Perhaps the radio (anti-theft) The drain should be small, the maker designed the electrical system to accommodate a small draw and the car should be able to handle it for at least a week, maybe even longer. The owner's ...


4

There are a few things that could be problems: Confirm that the bulbs are good. I've seen it happen more than once that one bulb burns out and you don't notice, then the second bulb burns out and that is when you notice. Check the fuses. On many cars the high and low beams are fused separately. Check, or listen, to determine if the relay controlling the ...


4

You mention, "no draining electrics," can you say more about how you determined this? It's important because "a self-draining battery" requires something that is causing a load on the battery – especially since you have a relatively new battery. On newer cars, there is a risk that disconnecting the battery may cause problems with your radio or other on-...


4

First the disclaimer: I don't know much about motorcycles – really all I know about motorcycles is inferred from cars and bicycles. But I do know a fair amount about electrical systems. That said… TL;DR – the headlight may have put your system out of balance by enough that your battery can't make up for the additional load and the alternator is always ...


3

The first thing to check (and think about when using a meter) is where the ground is coming from: Is there a ground wire in the trailer wiring? Is there a good solid connection of the ground wire to the frame of the trailer (or to the ground side of the circuits on the trailer)? Is there a good solid connection between the ground conductor on the vehicle ...


3

Firstly, please add more information: What is to make and model of you bike? What are the exact modifications you've done (with spec of the components)? Now, when you say "under full load" I assume that you mean with all optional electrical system on and at full settings (like with the high beam on). If that's what you mean, then your horn will function ...


3

So, the real question here isn't "can my battery do it," but "can my alternator do it?" All of the normal running load of your car should be supplied by the alternator. The battery is there to start the engine and to provide for high short term loads (e.g., the horn or maybe lights at idle). You can think of the battery as storage for electrical power, it ...


3

What can drain your battery is Alarm system, Radio (memory), Remote control key (radio signal receiver), ECU, Clock... Can't imagine anything else. Even if you have all of this, they shouldn't drain a battery in one week. Only thing you can do is to get a Ampere Meter and stick it in that faulty fuse to see what it drains. The fuse can not drain anything, ...


3

It depends on the car and battery. Look at the information label on the battery. The amount of acceptable draw is Reserve Capacity divided by 4 = x mA. So if a battery has a 100 minute reserve capacity, 100/4 = 0.025A or 25mA. Typically (again depending on car and battery) you shouldn't see > 50mA. Anything more may indicate a parasitic drain or a computer ...


3

If you're talking about a regular 12V battery vehicle, then the ECU is likely to work from 7V until 14V with no problem. That's the usual requirement for this kind of component.


2

What you're describing is almost certainly an electrical problem (or two). It sounds like two things are happening and they are quite likely related: Something is causing the engine to shutdown (your may find What can cause a gasoline engine to suddenly & mysteriously stop helpful for thinking about what could be happening). Something is causing the ...


2

Since its sporadic it is more annoying to troubleshoot, but you should be able to check for voltage after the combo switch and see if that is consistent. There should be continuous voltage to charge the flasher (from my understanding of how the flashers work) to charge the flasher. If there is stable voltage when the blinker stops blinking, then there's ...


2

Could be stretched timing chains or a problem with the vvt gear, stretched chains will give an incorrect reading between the cam sensor and the crank sensor (essentially engine is out of time) and will usually fail to start once stretched to far, if the correlation between cps and crank sensor if different for I think 5 seconds car will not start Could also ...


2

Basically, you want a device to activate when the 'system' is 'armed' and the door is opened. The easiest way to do this would be to tap into one of the outputs of an existing system, or install an aftermarket alarm system. If you want a completely different system, you will need door pin sensors to determine when the door has opened. You MIGHT be able to ...


2

Perform a continuity test on your combination switch. Get a multimeter and service manual for your vehicle and test the contacts with the switch in different positions.


2

This test is rudimentary, but efficient. Testing the battery voltage with the car off tells you the current state of the battery (can it hold a charge) Testing the battery voltage with the car on tells you the state of the alternator (can it recharge the battery) Measuring the battery draw while you are starting the car tells you the current state of the ...


2

It sounds like your alternator is not putting out full power – or perhaps the alternator output isn't getting to the battery. Often the wiring is set up so that the alternator is connected to the battery and all of the vehicle loads are connected from the battery. So, if the wire between the alternator and the battery is damaged or the connections are ...


2

I'd suggest one of your relays has gone astray. You can test this fairly easily by swapping out relays, if they are the same. Just remember which order you have them in originally, and exchange them one for another. This will help you determine which relay is bad and should also allow you to get the top back up for the meantime. It could very well be the ...


1

That sounds to me like an ignition switch that is failing. Do you have a lot of keys that share the same keyring as the key for the ignition? You might start by removing as much weight as you can from the keyring. If you have a heavy key ring, and that doesn't reliably fix it, then look into the cost of a new ignition switch. Intermittent problems like this ...


1

One option might be to change alternators to one with a higher output, the battery really should only be there to handle starting and intermittent loads (like your horn). The bulk of the electrical load should be handled by the alternator. Another question I'd ask is how much are you loosing by running the headlight on DC (which I think you're converting ...


1

This sounds more like a brush problem to me. The diode test information sounds like they are fine. If the brushes are worn and not making solid contact with the armature the alternator cannot produce the amperage needed.


1

I thought so...Ran into the same a while back: There's a recall for both cam and crank sensor premature failures on the 2.5L and it looks like the same sensors. New ones have a metal shell instead of being all plastic. Turns out there's a recall for the '03 350Z's too: http://www.dealerrater.com/recalls/Nissan/350Z/#2003 Bottom of the list: 2003 ...


1

If you're smelling exhaust in the cabin, it's not due to an air leak, but an exhaust leak. You could be having some issues there if your leak is prior to the O2 sensor in your exhaust pipe. Your ECU would think you have too much air in the mix, therefore making you run rich and flooding the engine so it won't start. Check your O2 sensor and inspect for ...


1

Bad battery, even though it initially tested well.


1

For some reason the site won't let me add comments . I have a firend that had a similar problem with his 06 it turned out to be the control module that turns off the battery if the door is left open he ended up putting a switch on the battery, opening the switch and closing reset the system. This was easier than pulling the battery cable and cheaper than ...


1

The B+ wire is likely alright if you noticed it on time, but the problem is due to the drained battery and the bad connection around the fuse. If it was the wrong gauge or something, it wouldn't melt around the fuse but likely elsewhere or wouldn't provide enough current to cause any damage. This happened to me on 2002 Beetle a week ago. After my alternator ...



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