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6

The CEL trigger implementation will vary across vehicles, but here are a few for you to try out. They should not have any negative effect in the long-term on the vehicle: P010x - unplug MAF sensor P030x - unplug a spark plug wire/coil (unplugging the corresponding injector is recommended) P0420/P0430 - unplug the O2 sensor after the catalytic converter


6

@JPhi1618 answer is good. I would just add a few more, You can unplug the EGR Valve electrical connector, no harm to engine. Pull out a coil pack or coil wire.


6

Start unplugging stuff. The engine will normally run with a lot of the sensors unplugged, but the check engine light will come on quickly. Some easy to reach ones: Mass Air Flow (MAF), Oxygen sensors, sometimes the throttle position indicator (on the throttle body). If you can unplug the power to the secondary air injection pump, it will cause a fun ...


5

It's just in front of the front passenger side door, under the dashboard. It might be stuck down behind the carpet a ways.


5

To add to the list, run the engine without the fuel filler cap on.


5

I've diagnosed this condition many times with a vehicle-specific scan tool, and I don't think it can be done without this or an oscilloscope. O2 sensors work in the range of less than 1 volt (.2v to .7v) In particular, the rear O2 sensor should stay at a fairly constant .5v if the cat is working right. Wild swings to the extremes indicate the cat isn't ...


5

Sourceforge has this scantool.net open source application. I have used it on my laptop with a USB to ODBII converter on various vehicles. You can google "USB to ODBII" and get multiple hits to procure this cable converter. Here is the LINK to the software download. It also comes with source code. Good luck.


4

There's a lot of work going on in this space, so the answer is "Yes, Of course!" Here is a Python project: http://www.obdtester.com/pyobd This looks like an interesting way to get data from the car, but doesn't seem to really be about trouble codes or diagnostics: http://openxcplatform.com/getting-started/index.html This looks very outdated, but maybe ...


4

Oh wow, there's definitely something funky going on with the electrical system. With regards to the P0563 and P0621, have you tried getting a live reading of the voltage from your scan tool or a multimeter when the car is running? My advice - get a decent automotive electrician on the case. Your run of the mill mechanic isn't the right person for the job


3

If you remove the passenger side foot kick panel covering the ECU you will see it there. On the 97 it is the blue 2 pin plug.


3

Some parts of the OBD-II code are the same for every vehicle (year/make/model independent), while others can be specific to a make and/or model. The year is usually irrelevant, though there has been some amount of change since OBD-II standards have been implemented. The website OBD-Codes.com explains the breakdown fairly well: The first character ...


3

Sounds to me like one of the spark plug wires isn't fully seated. I would check both ends of each cable and make sure they're fully seated. The engine code it produced should give you some idea where to start: P0300 - Random or multiple misfires P0301 - Misfire on cylinder 1 P0302 - Misfire on cylinder 2 P0303 - Misfire on cylinder 3 P0304 - Misfire on ...


3

Your engine should run smoothly the second you change your spark plugs, smoother than before even, that's the whole point of replacing them. Otherwise, something else is wrong or was performed improperly.


3

The first thing to do is too take the EGR out of circuit. A quick and easy way to do this is to cut an old metal oil can(its thin enough for scissors) so you have a piece of the can that will fit between the bolts of the EGR. Tighten the EGR bolts up with the can acting as a gasket. Now try watching the MAF sensor voltage as you rev the engine sharply and ...


3

If the condition that caused it to come on is a minor fault, and stops occurring, then yes, it will clear itself. If the condition indicates a larger problem, then it will stay on until cleared manually. A good example of a condition that will clear itself, is low brake fluid. I experienced this myself when I would only have the light come on when ...


2

You can try replacing the Engine Crank Angle Sensor, which I believe is the one which is playing erratic. The sensor looks like this: So it is the one you are looking at in the picture. Who knows why it's gone bad, but with the code you mentioned, this seems like the culprit. This is a very good video on the replacement of the sensor. The only thing I'd ...


2

First of all, no worries on the bad English side of things ... even those of us who speak it have issues sometimes! '-) As to your issue(s) ... the first thing I do when I've encountered a large number of codes as you've gotten is clear the computer, then rerun the engine to see which codes persist. This gets you a lot closer to the root cause of the issue. ...


2

We can still read the code without a code reader with a key dance. Some people said the e-brake must be on in order to do this but the main problem in my case was about the key dance itself. Basically, there's 4 ignition key positions: Off Accessories Run Start When I was doing the key dance, I was doing it between position 1 and 3. However, I just ...


2

I spoke with a few friends who do their own car repairs or who are professional mechanics. Their recommendation with any OBDII device is to capture any data that the device can capture and log it as long as the device or connected computer/tablet/phone can log it. It is better to have a data point and not need it than to need a data point and not have it.


1

For the TPS codes, it's probably a ground issue. Check for ground on the orange/dark blue wire. If you have ground on that wire disconnect and examine the connector for damage or a pin that's come loose. If you don't have ground you're going to have to examine the wiring harness especially around the rear of the valve cover. There is a splice in the ...


1

The light can clear itself. For instance if you leave the gas cap off when refueling, the light will come on and a code will be entered into the computer memory. Once the cap is put back on and a drive cycle occurs where the computer can detect that everything is good, the light will go off. The light will go off, but the code will remain in the computer ...


1

Rather than reprogram the ECU to ignore the sensor (which could then cause problems in the event there was a problem with your engine oil), why not simply replace the sensor. I'm sure it will be an inexpensive part when compared to the potential damage running with an unreported oil fault could cause. Also, as you say you've checked and replaced the sensor ...


1

The problems you are experiencing will have nothing to do with the transmission. Here is what the code explanation is. My feeling is it's with the Fuel pump driver module. It may be going bad. Code: P1233 - Fuel System Disabled or Offline Description: The PCM monitors the fuel pump monitor (FPM) circuit from the fuel pump driver module (FPDM). With ...


1

The gas or petrol cap is a good idea. Removing the coil pack(s), on cylinder 1, is another one. Sometimes you can easily find an electrical connector - say the O2 sensor - and disconnect it. This, of course, depends on what connectors are easily reachable. On a Hyundai Coupe, the O2 sensor is easily accessible.


1

The easiest thing I can think of is to remove the gas cap and start the engine. You should quickly see a MIL. The scan tool should report something like Evap emission fault large leak.


1

In general, yes. OIL fouling of the spark would be the correct assumption. However in this particular motor, which is notorius for blown head gaskets and lower intake manifold gasket leaks, allowing coolant into the combustion chamber I would take a look at these first, and in order. 1. fuel pressure, this all started after you ran out of gas correct? ...


1

Since you have new plugs and wires you may have a bad coil. Of course one of the new parts may be bad, not unheard of but unlikely. If the fuel injected into the cylinder isn't burned it passes into the exhaust system where the O2 sensor sees a rich condition that is outside the normal parameters and sets a fault code. You need to see if that cylinder is ...


1

Symptoms for a bad EGR valve and a bad MAF sensor aren't too different, it is a fair possibility that the MAF needs to be cleaned (easy to do). Just take the MAF sensor out, clean the electrical connection and spray through the sensor with some MAF cleaner or (though it's harsher it does work) Carb cleaner. Inspect the element, it should be a small silver ...


1

Speaking only in generalities (not being familiar with Fords of any kind), EGR systems fall victim to damaged vacuum lines occasionally, so check those. They can also clog up with carbon enough to fail to operate properly. Neither would normally happen in so few miles, but if the load was heavy enough, I suppose the enrichment program might lead to the ...


1

I don't have a solution specific to your car, but you may want to swing by your local auto parts store. They often have code readers on hand that they will use to read your codes for free. No idea if they'd have one that can do ABS codes on an OBD-I Volvo, but...



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