Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

Winter tyres are absolutely necessary when the temperatures fall below 4 degrees Celsius, even if there is no snow on the road itself. Cold roads are slippery as well, even with tiny amount of humidity. Summer tyres have significantly worse traction in cold weather, and the car steers like a curling stone -- that is, not at all. Sharp corners and moderate to ...


6

The recommendations given on the travel site hit most of the high points. As someone who grew up in snowy Western New York and had the opportunity to drive all manner of vehicles in the snow, I can say without a doubt that the single best preparation to the vehicle is to fit good snow tires. Secondly, decrease your speed in snowy/freezing/wet conditions, ...


6

Install snow tires. If it's 4-wheel drive or front wheel drive, install on all four wheels; if rear-wheel drive, just the driving wheels, although all four would be best. You might get away with summer tires + chains, but they have to be propely fitted and legal for where you intend to use them (check local regulations). If temperatures are no more than a ...


5

I posted a piece on Being Prepared in the snow on my personal blog a couple of years back. I didn't think of the Carbon Monoxide problem @mac mentioned, but there are some useful snippets there: With this winter in Scotland already a repeat of the freezing conditions of last year we are still astonished at how many people leave themselves at risk by being ...


5

DISCLAIMER: This is one of those questions where you are going to get a ton of opinion and speculation, and my reply will have some of that in it as well. I think there is a lot of myth out there about what cars actually need to maintain them as they are and should be. For instance, your comment about the M5 owner. The entire statement is about seat of the ...


4

As asked, the question is highly subjective, and Paulster2 provides sound reasoning that makes it amply clear why. In an effort to remain objective, I will stick with the example of the BMW M5 (which I own). The source of the Italian tune-up myth pertaining to the E39 M5 is easily explained. Every car has its quirks and design flaws and the M5 is no ...


4

Go rent a car and practice. The only thing different is that you need to develop a feel for when the clutch is engaged sufficiently for you to give it gas. "Academically" speaking, you need to give a little bit of gas, let go of the clutch slowly until the car just starts to move, and then slightly increase the gas while releasing the clutch smoothly. Think ...


3

My biggest concern would be the weight of the vehicle and the overconfidence that a 4x4 causes. It's real easy to overestimate the available traction in a 4x4. Starting out from a stop seems so easy that it's real easy to forget that normal braking is typically harder than normal acceleration. You may well be right on the edge on acceleration, and then ...


1

You are correct - in a modern fuel-injected vehicle, the ECU will cut the fuel right back (or even off completely) if you are coasting downhill in gear, wheras more fuel is needed to maintain an idle.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible