Hot answers tagged

18

It absolutely does. It's called riding the clutch. Even though you "believe" you just have your foot there, it forces the pedal down and takes up the slack which is there. This causes the throw out bearing to ride against the clutch fingers, which presses so ever slightly and causes the clutch to not have as much grip. This causes the clutch friction disk to ...


8

Your car may have plastic guards underneath to stop water from spraying up on sensitive components, but everything under the hood is typically waterproof to some degree. That said, the only "damage" I have ever seen is the spray of water loosening or tearing off plastic guards that are not properly fastened or half-way ripped off already. The basic short ...


7

In a perfect world from a physics textbook, you might be able to ask the question you have, and expect to compare time vs. engine speed, but there are many more factors in the real world. The speed-agnostic measure is Miles Per Gallon (or l/km). Speed doesn't appear in the name, because it doesn't matter. At higher speeds, things like wind resistance and ...


7

Drive by wire systems have no mechanical connection between the input decive (like a throttle/gas pedal) and the output device (like the engine). They use only electrical signals. To my knowledge there aren't any cars that use this system for steering. Your steering wheel is mechanically connected to the front wheels but is assisted by an electric motor. ...


7

fuel injected vehicles don't require a crazy amount of fuel to get started, in terms of fuel economy alone anything over 30 seconds should be safe (although we are talking about levels of fuel only eco-modders care about). If you are concerned about wear, there's no good way to tell which is better. If you change oil regularly I wouldn't worry about the wear ...


7

wear is increased at engine start When you have no oil pressure and you start the car, that is when the most wear occurs on your bearings. Crank bearings in most cars are not roller bearings anymore. They are called plain bearings and rely on hydro-dynamic lubrication. Here is answer related to crank bearings with illustrations so you can understand ...


6

I had a buddy years ago who liked to do the same thing. Our big plans were cut short one evening when he hit a good sized puddle and managed to knock his muffler completely off. It was surely loose before, but it would have been nice to repair it some other time. It certainly won't help anything. If you splash pedestrians, you won't win any friends, ...


6

This wont do any damage to your engine until you have an accident making a mistake with the pedals:) The IAC would only doing the same function that you are doing manually. I do think you have more of a problem than the IAC being faulty, since it should just add extra air when you switch things on like the lights, air con etc. Maybe your throttle ...


6

Although I am unsure of the material that is being used for the roadway in your photos it appears similar to Topmix Permeable concrete You asked Can anyone explain how new pavements achieve this remarkable performance at eliminating splashing? Response Topmix Permeable concrete is simply a very porous concrete interlaced with large rounded pebbles. ...


5

Bit of transmissions 101 First gear makes the most torque / power, but has the lowest top speed and worst fuel economy. Top gear has the highest top speed and best fuel economy, but the least amount of power and torque. In an auto, leaving it in D is fine 99% of the time unless you need more power. Shifting into 3, 2, or 1 typically limits you to that ...


5

It's Flüsterasphalt (literaly whisper asphalt) @DucatiKiller has already given a nice answer about a concrete version of this, however, this is really asphalt and is also processed more or less like standard asphalt (Lots of heat etc.). The one and only reason why this is used here in Germany is to reduce the noise of the wheels on the road, and it really ...


5

"Blipping" the throttle just means giving it a very short (half a second) stab raising the RPM for a short time. It creates smoother down shifts because it raises the RPM to where it's going to be after the shift so the synchros have less work to do.


5

A lot of that depends on the type of vehicle, and your definition of 'fast'. Take this with a grain of salt, but a while back BBC's Top Gear did a test involving a V8 powered BMW M3 and a Toyota Prius. The Prius was driven as fast as it could go around their test track, while all the M3 had to do was keep up. After a few laps, the Prius had done ~18 mpg, ...


4

I have a 2013 Honda Civic EX Sedan. The ECON mode, from my research and personal experience with my car, does the following: changes the shift pattern of the transmission to maximize mpg by limiting downshifts unless you "floor it", reduces the A/C compressor operation and A/C fan to conserve mpg, changes the throttle response to maximize mpg and adjusts ...


4

As HandyHowie said, this won't cause any damage. However, there is a better way, based on the assumption that you have a foot on the brake because you leave the car in D at the lights. If the car will still idle in N with a bad IAC, select N as you're coming to a stop and put it back in D as you press the gas pedal to set off again. Make sure the revs are ...


4

Once you have driven a few cars for a while you will get used to knowing from walking up to a car and getting in just how big it is. But until that time you can use some useful tricks: parallax: if you really want to get a good idea of distance, move your head from left to right to see how much a point on the object in front moves compared to a reference ...


3

In a manual tranmission car, the clutch is 'meshed' only when both sides of the clutch - the engine side and the wheel side - are running at the same speed. Downshifting Example I'll make up some numbers for an example: Say you're at 3rd gear, going 45 miles an hour and the engine is at 2.5k RPM. If you downshift while still going 45 miles an hour, the ...


3

Wet brake pads don't stop as well\quickly as dry ones. I remember this as more of a issue with drums vs discs, but I still always hit the brakes lightly after a puddle to help them dry. Also if you have any tire problems already (say a weak spot on the side wall), the shock from the bump may be enough to make the weak spot into a blow out. But hey.......


3

There is a very simple answer. The friction co-efficient on the paint lines is lower than the pavement. It's pretty common on almost any paint line in any state within the Union. That being said, some road racing governing bodies like the FIM and FIA force circuits to use a particular type of paint with grit in it that has a higher friction co-efficient ...


3

The stalling symptoms could be explained by a fuel pump relay that doesn't like heat. I say this because the vehicle stalled seemingly intermittently, but whenever the car had been running for quite some time, only for it to start up again after a few minutes (allowing the relay to cool down a bit). If the relay is the root cause, the fix would be to ...


3

When you say "stopped dead in its tracks" I assume you mean with the wheels spinning. In this circumstance your choice of gear selection in an automatic is pretty much meaningless. What you generally want is less torque to avoid wheel slip. In a manual transmission you could use a higher-than-normal gear to some benefit, but such a feature is generally not ...


3

Every single car is different, most of them have different steering angle, different turn radius, etc. So it's all about getting used to it. But sometimes it doesn't work, especially on a long base comfortable cars, that's why designers invented parking sensors... Many urban cars (small and maneuvrable) if you look from the top, they have really round ...


3

As said in the other answers, each car is different, and it's mostly experience, if you don't have these little electronic helpers. But I have one trick: Watch the light cones of your front light. As you move towards a wall or an other car, the cones become smaller and smaller, until they are ultimately as wide as your lights. So the width of the light cone ...


2

In a properly maintained fully functional manual transmission equipped automobile, I prefer to be in neutral with my foot not on the clutch pedal. The reasoning is that if I happen to be rear ended or something, there is no way for me to accidentally take my foot off of the clutch and roll out further into cross traffic.


2

There are a number of factors that could contribute to this happening. Improperly inflated tires If your tires aren't inflated correctly for their size and the weight of your vehicle they may not have a proper contact patch with the road. Very Soft (sport) tires Very soft tires are great for gripping a rough surface like concrete or asphalt. They kind ...


2

The only real world difference between a sedan and a hatchback is the added trunk(weight) and in some cases a longer wheelbase in case of a sedan.(Not counting Looks obviously) The above difference doesn't define the driveability of the vehicle on snow. To drive on snow a AWD drive system with traction control and higher ground clearance is all that's ...


2

If you have just been doing some heavy braking, making the discs very hot. Cooling them very quickly by driving through water could warp the discs.


2

Do a search on google for "torque power graph". These graphs plot torque and power against RPM and each engine design will be different. From a graph for your engine you would be able to see which RPM produced the greatest torque. You may be able to find specs for your engine specifying maximum torque and the RPM where this is delivered.


1

I cannot know for sure, but the new pavement may be more permeable than the old, allowing water to quickly drain directly through the roadway, rather than collecting on the surface and having to run off the sides. See this video for a demonstration


1

One downside is that you can't seen how deep a puddle is, or if there is a big hole in it. You could cause some suspension damage by hitting a big pothole hidden under (inside?) a puddle.



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