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8

The ECON button is not a placebo, though the wording from that specific web page is a bit vague. The key is that the ECON button and the Eco-Assist system are two separate things. According to Honda, pressing the ECON button configures your car to improve mileage at the cost of performance. Turning it off will improve power and reduce mileage, which you ...


4

I don't know what that specific button does, but I can tell you what similar buttons in other cars do: they retard your throttle response so that your car feels more sluggish. This means that when you step on the gas, it does not cause the throttle to open quite as much, making your drive smoother and more fuel efficient. Conversely, a "sport" button would ...


4

If there is room behind the seat now (ie: you could slide the seat back further if it would let you), I'd pull the current seat out and remount it further to the rear. It sounds as though you'd only need about 2-3" more space to make it worth it. Most seats are bolted down using four mounting points, two on each seat rail. If these are bolts (or studs) which ...


4

It would certainly help. Just be careful of bucket seats. If you have a bigger than average backside, the bucket seat's lateral supports tend to dig into your thighs and will make for an infuriating long distance trip. Also, spend a bit more money and get good quality items. I had a set of NRX (made in China or something) seats which broke after two years. ...


2

I have a 2013 Honda Civic EX Sedan. The ECON mode, from my research and personal experience with my car, does the following: changes the shift pattern of the transmission to maximize mpg by limiting downshifts unless you "floor it", reduces the A/C compressor operation and A/C fan to conserve mpg, changes the throttle response to maximize mpg and adjusts ...


2

I drive a 2014 Civic EX coupe, automatic, and about a week ago turned the Econ button off... the icon light on the dash turned off. I bought the car several months ago and it didn't occur to me until now to try this. Performance has been about the same, but my mileage has actually INCREASED 3-4 MPG! Go figure.


2

There is a very simple answer. The friction co-efficient on the paint lines is lower than the pavement. It's pretty common on almost any paint line in any state within the Union. That being said, some road racing governing bodies like the FIM and FIA force circuits to use a particular type of paint with grit in it that has a higher friction co-efficient ...


2

There are a number of factors that could contribute to this happening. Improperly inflated tires If your tires aren't inflated correctly for their size and the weight of your vehicle they may not have a proper contact patch with the road. Very Soft (sport) tires Very soft tires are great for gripping a rough surface like concrete or asphalt. They kind ...


2

This could work in a car with an open differential and an active traction control system. When the system detects a wheel spin, it actively brakes (and locks out) the particular wheel, as a consequence the torque is directed by the differential to the wheel with traction (least resistance, as you noted). I do not know the details of the implementation in ...


2

The only real world difference between a sedan and a hatchback is the added trunk(weight) and in some cases a longer wheelbase in case of a sedan.(Not counting Looks obviously) The above difference doesn't define the driveability of the vehicle on snow. To drive on snow a AWD drive system with traction control and higher ground clearance is all that's ...


1

It very much depends on the specific vehicle and more so on the type of tyres fitted. As a side note, my old Lancia Delta HF Integrale 16V rally car (a hatchback) was brilliant on the snow whilst my fathers Lexus IS200 (a saloon) was awful.


1

It doesn't really matter. Everything else being equal, the car with the most neutral weight distribution would perform best in snow. I would even think that the car that has the bulk of its weight up front would be least inclined to skid or overstear. Usually, that would be a hatchback, but in these modern times most vehicle manufacturers build their cars ...


1

Having driven a bus with a non-synchro gearbox and a wet clutch, I understand the meaning behind "stuck in neutral" - for if you didn't slide it into first before coming to a halt, there was no getting it into first without suffering the embarrassment of shutting down the engine. The habit dies hard; synchro or not, I still hold at a light in first gear, ...



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