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10

The Click & Clack method: Sitting in the driver’s seat (left or right-hand drive vehicle): Driver’s side mirror Lean your head against the window, and set the driver’s side mirror so that you can just see the side of your car in the mirror. Passenger side mirror: Position your head, as best as possible to the middle of the car. Use your radio, or ...


9

It is straightforward to do this without any wear to your synchromesh, but it takes a lot of practice, especially when downshifting as you need to match revs accurately. Learning to heel and toe correctly will help you a lot here! You should never need to race the engine, as you should be using the same rev range as you would normally driving the car!


7

Winter tyres are absolutely necessary when the temperatures fall below 4 degrees Celsius, even if there is no snow on the road itself. Cold roads are slippery as well, even with tiny amount of humidity. Summer tyres have significantly worse traction in cold weather, and the car steers like a curling stone -- that is, not at all. Sharp corners and moderate to ...


6

The recommendations given on the travel site hit most of the high points. As someone who grew up in snowy Western New York and had the opportunity to drive all manner of vehicles in the snow, I can say without a doubt that the single best preparation to the vehicle is to fit good snow tires. Secondly, decrease your speed in snowy/freezing/wet conditions, ...


6

Install snow tires. If it's 4-wheel drive or front wheel drive, install on all four wheels; if rear-wheel drive, just the driving wheels, although all four would be best. You might get away with summer tires + chains, but they have to be propely fitted and legal for where you intend to use them (check local regulations). If temperatures are no more than a ...


5

There is no 'per-country' recommended driving speed for fuel efficiency. It depends on the shape of your car, your engine size and type, the type of fuel you use, the quality of the roads etc. In my car for example, in top gear I can get 37 mpg at 60mph and it has a gentle drop up to about 75mph, but the efficiency drops off rapidly over 75mph (35mpg at 75 ...


5

I posted a piece on Being Prepared in the snow on my personal blog a couple of years back. I didn't think of the Carbon Monoxide problem @mac mentioned, but there are some useful snippets there: With this winter in Scotland already a repeat of the freezing conditions of last year we are still astonished at how many people leave themselves at risk by being ...


5

DISCLAIMER: This is one of those questions where you are going to get a ton of opinion and speculation, and my reply will have some of that in it as well. I think there is a lot of myth out there about what cars actually need to maintain them as they are and should be. For instance, your comment about the M5 owner. The entire statement is about seat of the ...


4

As asked, the question is highly subjective, and Paulster2 provides sound reasoning that makes it amply clear why. In an effort to remain objective, I will stick with the example of the BMW M5 (which I own). The source of the Italian tune-up myth pertaining to the E39 M5 is easily explained. Every car has its quirks and design flaws and the M5 is no ...


4

My choice would depend on the duration of the stop. If your rolling up to an intersection and see the light change to red knowing you will sit for a full cycle I'd opt for "in neutral foot off the clutch". Pulling up to an already red light I would go for "in gear clutch depressed" as you can figure you'll have a short wait. Having the clutch depressed adds ...


4

Go rent a car and practice. The only thing different is that you need to develop a feel for when the clutch is engaged sufficiently for you to give it gas. "Academically" speaking, you need to give a little bit of gas, let go of the clutch slowly until the car just starts to move, and then slightly increase the gas while releasing the clutch smoothly. Think ...


3

My biggest concern would be the weight of the vehicle and the overconfidence that a 4x4 causes. It's real easy to overestimate the available traction in a 4x4. Starting out from a stop seems so easy that it's real easy to forget that normal braking is typically harder than normal acceleration. You may well be right on the edge on acceleration, and then ...


3

Question: given that clutch-less shift is executed properly, does it take a toll on transmission in any way? See Rory's answer: it is possible to do properly without wear. It is difficult to do properly every time. For example: does clutch-less shifting reduce life of synchros? While you are learning shift clutch-free, yes, you will beat the ...


3

It is fine to just put it back into drive. You probably don't want to do it repeatedly because you could maybe wear out some clutch packs in your auto trans but for the most part it is much safer to just throw it into drive and get back into the flow of traffic than coasting and pulling over to stop then back to drive. When you put the car into neutral at ...


3

It's hard to say as it depends on various conditions like the gearing of your car but on a perfectly flat road, I'd say put the car into the highest gear and take your foot off the throttle. The speed the car settles down to is just about your most efficient cruising speed: Highest gear, no throttle.


2

Guidance from the Institute of Advanced Motorists in the UK is to place the car into neutral and use the parking brake. The wear on the clutch from keeping the clutch pedal in isn't likely to be an issue(*), but in the event of the car behind bumping you your foot could slip off the clutch, propelling you into the car in front! From an ecological ...


2

Some of what your friends have told you is nonsense. You will possibly have less chance of getting stuck in the winter in a RWD car, as RWD gives you more grip when trying to accelerate forwards (as weight moves rearward). Whenever I have had to rescue friends in FWD cars, I usually need to use reverse to get grip. Additional set of winter tyres? Nope - ...


2

I grew up in Finland, where winters are long and icy. Mostly drove RWD cars, but also, at times, owned FWD and AWD ones. If you look at all the nordic/scandinavian rally champions, they preferred front wheel drive, until the Audi Quattro changed rallying forever. But that is assuming you are a professional rally driver... :) There is no clear answer - ...


1

You are correct - in a modern fuel-injected vehicle, the ECU will cut the fuel right back (or even off completely) if you are coasting downhill in gear, wheras more fuel is needed to maintain an idle.


1

I'm not aware of any automatic transmission cars that even have a flywheel. One of the noise isolation procedures that is used by mechanics involves getting up to highway speed, knocking the car into neutral, then knocking it back into drive (while comparing the sounds between the 2). I can't guarantee that it's safe on any particular car, but as a general ...


1

I had an old T5 I could shift beautifully without the clutch but the motor had to be screaming (somewhere between 4 and 5 grand). At normal operating speeds the transition just wasn't fast enough and the gears would grind. I've never seen a tranny that would tolerate clutchless shifting under regular conditions without some major gear crunching.


1

1) How troublesome is it to have RWD with above mentioned conditions? 2) What will be safer: RWD vs FWD on dry pavement, gravel, snow, ice? 3) What generally has better handling and traction during bad weather: heavy rain, snow, ice? With all do respect i have to disagree with Rory Alsop's asnwer. Please do the following: a.) Look up ...


1

I guess it depends on where you live. I've driven mostly RWD, with some FWD and AWD. The only car I've ever gotten stuck in snow was FWD (when strong gusty winds blew me sideways off an icy road and into a snowbank). We can get sizeable amounts of snow some years here in Ohio, and even when driving around on Summer tires in the Winter I didn't ever get my ...


1

The "best fuel economy values" range (according to tests I've read) from 40-55mph depending on the vehicle and conditions.



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