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25

To expand a little on what Eric said... I consider the 4WD versus AWD to largely be marketing terms differentiating between vehicles with additional ground clearance and plating underneath to protect sensitive components while going over rough terrain off-road travel (4WD) from systems that are targeted more towards on-road travel (AWD). Though this is ...


12

The short answer is probably not, but you are creating undue hardship on the internals that will likely lead them to fail earlier than they would otherwise. When you drive your car, you are putting wear and tear on basically everything. Driving your car harder (accelerating quickly, stopping abruptly) just adds to the wear you are putting on it. Even just ...


11

Belt vs Chain in Motorcycles It's difficult to say which one is better. Depending on the application, one can be better or not in the particular role. High horsepower applications are not the place of belts and low maintenance is not the place for chains. Applications vary and one is not necessarily better than the other overall. The role of the final ...


11

Newtons Third Law For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. The statement means that in every interaction, there is a pair of forces acting on the two interacting objects. The size of the forces on the first object equals the size of the force on the second object. The lateral center of gravity (CG) is above the axle as well. So you have ...


10

OP, Here's an example of a plastic engine cover on my 2001 VW Jetta VR6: I can't speak for your car in particular (unless you specify what it is), but in my case it has a number of non-critical functions: Aesthetics. This looks far nicer than seeing a bunch of exhaust headers (stock ones are never pretty), oil seepage on my valve cover, fuel injection ...


10

The vehicle in question is a front-wheel drive. FWDs are sensitive to front wheel alignment, since the front suspension and wheel linkages work under different conditions when accelerating and not accelerating: on acceleration, the wheels push backwards on the road, thus tend to move the front suspension forwards relative to the vehicle. on de-acceleration,...


10

How can I shorten a drive shaft? The easiest way to shorten a drive shaft is by taking it to the shop and having them do the work for you, to include balancing. I take it this is not what you're asking for though, so here goes: Are there any warnings before proceeding? There are three big issues with shortening the drive shaft (DS): Length ...


8

Reading around a bit on the dual mass clutch the friction plate between the two masses is the component that will often wear out as it is designed to keep from too much torque being sent through to the transmission, taking the hit itself instead (choice between burning up a couple hundred dollar flywheel or a transmission in the thousands of dollars). ...


8

The short answer is that yes, you can change your differential to optimize fuel efficiency. CAVEAT: it is almost certainly not worth it. Here's a very high level discussion of why there are better ways to achieve the same goal (better fuel efficiency): Think about how the air-fuel mixture in the engine is managed: for each revolution of the engine, a unit ...


8

Yes, gear ratios are the second largest influence on your fuel consumption. Number one being maladjusted timing. I always relay the story of my and my wife's cars: she has a 1.4 Opel Corsa and I have a 2.0 Turbo Coupe. While my car has more than twice the power of hers and weighs 350kg more, we get about the same consumption figures (she gets 12.5km/l and I ...


7

It can be very difficult to isolate if it is from the tires or the drive line.. but most of the time, it is the tires. Looking at the tires with the naked eye when there is no load on the tire is not very telling though. The best thing is to find a shop with a Hunter DSP 9000 or similar machine that measures so called road force. This will measure the tire ...


7

I think it's more related to the angle of the driveshaft from the transmission to the differential. This way you could have more suspension travel without putting too much constraints on parts. In fact, to answer your question, it may be related to the geometry of the truck/driveshaft that manufacturer will select one type over another one. If the truck is ...


7

Here are some reasons why some manufacturers use belts. Smoothness of the drive: The belt has the quality of putting down the torque of the engine much more smoothly and gradually than the chain counterpart, in a belt driven motorcycle you wont feel the sudden TUG when you twist the throttle.(This is the reason usually cruisers have this design and not the ...


7

Are you referring to the Driveshaft FlexDisc?


6

So two things to consider, acceleration from stopped, and top end speed. And based on your question, the following are identical: Engine horsepower Aerodynamics Gear ratios Tire size And the only difference is one is a transverse mounted front wheel drive, and the other is a rear wheel drive. Acceleration from a stop In this case I think if the two cars ...


6

I don't think it's safe/wise to drive 80 miles on that. It needs to be put on a trailer and dragged home at son's expense (some insurances cover towing also, but 80 miles is a bit far. If you have a truck, maybe rent a trailer for the day)


6

My options would be to replace the shaft were it sits now. No fun as a "flat back" job but it is not very hard. Or tow it to a repair site. It does not look like it should be driven. A driveshaft that gets loose can cause lots of damage. Removing the shaft and driving without one in place is not an option as this would likely damage the dual pump drive ...


5

I believe the most common use is noise reduction. As engines got smaller they rev'd higher. The mufflers got moved to the back of the car. No more engine exhaust roar. The result is engine buzz,noise,clacks etc. The cover muffles the injector clicks,belt noise etc. It also just looks cooler to see Vortec, Turbo,SFI .


5

I think the listed stats make it pretty clear: you are driving a heavy van with a fairly low power engine. More importantly, it's likely that you have a low torque engine which is critical to keep the vehicle rolling. What you're used to in the passenger car is the same as what happens in the van, just to a lesser degree. In your passenger car, you were ...


5

In theory, the harder you accelerate or decelerate(brake), the more you put stress on the different parts. Most stressed parts when accelerating, in this order: Gearbox gears Crankshaft Fly bearings Piston rings etc etc. Most stressed parts when braking: Forks and the rubber buffers Wheel hub Tires


5

I pulled the tires off and inspected the front end suspension and steering, and found that the sway bar linkage on the drivers side was detached.


5

No. The rear wheels are ALWAYS driven in all Toyota Tacoma models. There is no mechanism to disconnect the rear wheels, while there is a transfer case to engage/disengage the front wheels. Most AWD cars that only drive the front wheels until more traction is needed use a transaxle. Toyota also does not sell a FWD only Tacoma, but they do sell RWD only ...


4

In regards to most pickup trucks 2WD - RWD — only the rear wheels turn. If the diff's have limited slip they will allow some variation across axles in tire speed. 4WD High — all 4 wheels are driven. If the diff's have limited slip they will allow limited variation across axles in tire speed. 4WD Low — all 4 wheels are driven. All diff's are locked. This ...


4

To this question, there are quite a few perspectives to answer the question from. For example, advantages to the vehicle manufacturer of using transmission + engine types that are already developed and have passed emissions (Notice that manufacturers seem to use variants of the same engine for multiple vehicles) or are lower cost, may not include any ...


4

Both methods of drive have their advantages. FWD is generally cheaper to build, and gives more space inside the vehicle (as there is no need for a transmission tunnel). It is also generally easier for a less skilled driver to control - Most ordinary people don't want to need to learn how to drift or control a slide. On the other hand, smaller FWD cars can ...


4

I have a VW Jetta 1.8T. The factory service manual produced by Bentley (for Volkswagen) specifically calls this component the upper sound absorber panel. To an extent, these are eye candy, but their primary function is for sound dampening. That being said, I know many people remove them when they are displaying aftermarket components, or keep their valve ...


4

The answer to the first bullet. The roll of the CV or constant velocity joint is to enable movement with independent suspension. As the geometry changes (when you hit a bump), the wheel moves up. If the axle were solid, this would be unable to happen. The CV joint allows for the movement of the suspension. I guess you could think of it like a swivel socket. ...


4

I think most BMW owners call them a "Giubo". I have no idea where that comes from or why, but you'll find it very easily by Googling it by that name.


4

Your automatic transmission is your weakest link The wear will primarily be in your automatic transmission. When starting from a stop your first gear is now considerably taller. When you first start to roll it takes the rear wheels longer to get the inner hub to the RPM's that full 1st gear engagement occurs because of the larger diameter of the rear ...


4

Jerking and thumping when shifting through gears is an indication that you have bad either: bad engine mounts bad transmission mounts bad differential mounts bad axles a combination or all of the above Shifting into neutral does relieve the "tension", as you put it, but you need to care care of these issues. They can end up being costly.



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