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21

To expand a little on what Eric said... I consider the 4WD versus AWD to largely be marketing terms differentiating between vehicles with additional ground clearance and plating underneath to protect sensitive components while going over rough terrain off-road travel (4WD) from systems that are targeted more towards on-road travel (AWD). Though this is ...


10

The vehicle in question is a front-wheel drive. FWDs are sensitive to front wheel alignment, since the front suspension and wheel linkages work under different conditions when accelerating and not accelerating: on acceleration, the wheels push backwards on the road, thus tend to move the front suspension forwards relative to the vehicle. on ...


9

The short answer is probably not, but you are creating undue hardship on the internals that will likely lead them to fail earlier than they would otherwise. When you drive your car, you are putting wear and tear on basically everything. Driving your car harder (accelerating quickly, stopping abruptly) just adds to the wear you are putting on it. Even just ...


7

The short answer is that yes, you can change your differential to optimize fuel efficiency. CAVEAT: it is almost certainly not worth it. Here's a very high level discussion of why there are better ways to achieve the same goal (better fuel efficiency): Think about how the air-fuel mixture in the engine is managed: for each revolution of the engine, a unit ...


6

OP, Here's an example of a plastic engine cover on my 2001 VW Jetta VR6: I can't speak for your car in particular (unless you specify what it is), but in my case it has a number of non-critical functions: Aesthetics. This looks far nicer than seeing a bunch of exhaust headers (stock ones are never pretty), oil seepage on my valve cover, fuel injection ...


6

I think it's more related to the angle of the driveshaft from the transmission to the differential. This way you could have more suspension travel without putting too much constraints on parts. In fact, to answer your question, it may be related to the geometry of the truck/driveshaft that manufacturer will select one type over another one. If the truck is ...


5

Yes, gear ratios are the second largest influence on your fuel consumption. Number one being maladjusted timing. I always relay the story of my and my wife's cars: she has a 1.4 Opel Corsa and I have a 2.0 Turbo Coupe. While my car has more than twice the power of hers and weighs 350kg more, we get about the same consumption figures (she gets 12.5km/l and I ...


5

I pulled the tires off and inspected the front end suspension and steering, and found that the sway bar linkage on the drivers side was detached.


4

I think the listed stats make it pretty clear: you are driving a heavy van with a fairly low power engine. More importantly, it's likely that you have a low torque engine which is critical to keep the vehicle rolling. What you're used to in the passenger car is the same as what happens in the van, just to a lesser degree. In your passenger car, you were ...


4

To this question, there are quite a few perspectives to answer the question from. For example, advantages to the vehicle manufacturer of using transmission + engine types that are already developed and have passed emissions (Notice that manufacturers seem to use variants of the same engine for multiple vehicles) or are lower cost, may not include any ...


4

Both methods of drive have their advantages. FWD is generally cheaper to build, and gives more space inside the vehicle (as there is no need for a transmission tunnel). It is also generally easier for a less skilled driver to control - Most ordinary people don't want to need to learn how to drift or control a slide. On the other hand, smaller FWD cars can ...


4

In regards to most pickup trucks 2WD - RWD — only the rear wheels turn. If the diff's have limited slip they will allow some variation across axles in tire speed. 4WD High — all 4 wheels are driven. If the diff's have limited slip they will allow limited variation across axles in tire speed. 4WD Low — all 4 wheels are driven. All diff's are locked. This ...


4

I have a VW Jetta 1.8T. The factory service manual produced by Bentley (for Volkswagen) specifically calls this component the upper sound absorber panel. To an extent, these are eye candy, but their primary function is for sound dampening. That being said, I know many people remove them when they are displaying aftermarket components, or keep their valve ...


4

I believe the most common use is noise reduction. As engines got smaller they rev'd higher. The mufflers got moved to the back of the car. No more engine exhaust roar. The result is engine buzz,noise,clacks etc. The cover muffles the injector clicks,belt noise etc. It also just looks cooler to see Vortec, Turbo,SFI .


3

So you need to find out where on your drive train. Get your Jeep up off the ground so you can drive the wheels, and have a listen. Likely places: Differential Universal joints on axles Tire rubbing on bodywork Brake pad rubbing against disc


3

4WD is distinguished from "part time" 4WD in that you can't turn it off - the vehicle is always in 4WD. Vehicles that have this usually have a differential built into the transfer case to allow for full time 4WD even on dry pavement. AWD is almost the same as full time 4WD, except that AWD vehicles generally don't have the high-torque low gear option (4L) ...


3

I also have a AWD Trailblazer, and low diff oil can cause uneven gear wear (mine is perennially low because I have a leaking diff seal which the dealer can't get out). As the oil heats up, the vibration can become more prominent because the thick oil is no longer damping the vibration. You may also want to check that your wheels are balanced. You might ...


3

In theory, the harder you accelerate or decelerate(brake), the more you put stress on the different parts. Most stressed parts when accelerating, in this order: Gearbox gears Crankshaft Fly bearings Piston rings etc etc. Most stressed parts when braking: Forks and the rubber buffers Wheel hub Tires


2

I did this work on my own. I would like to share what I learned on this site. I wanted to write this because I was not satisfied with the instructions I've seen elsewhere on the internet about how to do it. However, I realize that I don't have all the answers, so I decided to instead write a narrative describing how I did the work. It would be great if ...


2

First, as a fellow NA MX5 owner I would simply replace the diff with a Torsen LSD out of an NA 1.8 MX5 and be done with it. It's the most cost effective swap I'm aware of if you actually do need an LSD. Plus it's a fairly strong LSD anyway so unless you're planning to put silly power through it, it should last. That said, the difference between the LSD ...


2

Some of what your friends have told you is nonsense. You will possibly have less chance of getting stuck in the winter in a RWD car, as RWD gives you more grip when trying to accelerate forwards (as weight moves rearward). Whenever I have had to rescue friends in FWD cars, I usually need to use reverse to get grip. Additional set of winter tyres? Nope - ...


2

Someone on another forum I frequent had a Propshaft made by Dave Mac Props in Coventry. It cost him around £300, so I'd expect Driveshafts to be less than that. Otherwise, have you tried more conventional Engineering firms? i.e. non car-specific ones.


2

I grew up in Finland, where winters are long and icy. Mostly drove RWD cars, but also, at times, owned FWD and AWD ones. If you look at all the nordic/scandinavian rally champions, they preferred front wheel drive, until the Audi Quattro changed rallying forever. But that is assuming you are a professional rally driver... :) There is no clear answer - ...


2

1) How troublesome is it to have RWD with above mentioned conditions? 2) What will be safer: RWD vs FWD on dry pavement, gravel, snow, ice? 3) What generally has better handling and traction during bad weather: heavy rain, snow, ice? With all do respect i have to disagree with Rory Alsop's asnwer. Please do the following: a.) Look up ...


2

A Google search revealed several sources for a replacement final drive belt. Getting a replacement should not be a problem. If the current belt is more than five years old or the owner doesn't know how old it is I would replace it soon. The advantages of belt drive are less maintenance, no lubricant is slung off, like on a chain and they are quieter. The ...


2

A two piece shaft is used to prevent the shaft from bending at high RPM. This is know as the whipping effect. As the shaft will not bend, therefore the transmission tunnel or floor above the shaft can be lower allowing more room for passengers or goods.


2

A plate between the flywheel housing on the engine and the bell housing of the gearbox would almost certainly be required to mount the gearbox. This would be no problem to produce with a CNC machine. The problems that then arise would be to reconcile the differances in the two gearboxes. Will the gearbox obstruct the clutch assembly in any way? Will the ...


2

There is a company on the web called Phoenix Casting & Machine. They make adapter plates to mate automotive transmissions to non-automotive engines (they also make the spacers for the flywheel to compensate). The SD33T was originally designed as a fork lift engine. If I read the specs right, it has an SAE #3 transmission mount bolt pattern. This is why ...


2

1) Since my ABS light isn't on on my dash, can I safely assume that it's fine as-is, or is this something that will likely come back to bite me later on? Yes. If the sensor was not picking up the signal, you won't see it at first (after the self diagnostics are done, that is). Once you start driving, the computer will notice the differential and then ...


2

This could work in a car with an open differential and an active traction control system. When the system detects a wheel spin, it actively brakes (and locks out) the particular wheel, as a consequence the torque is directed by the differential to the wheel with traction (least resistance, as you noted). I do not know the details of the implementation in ...



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