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5

If you cannot manually lock the door, the power locks will not work because all it does is move the mechanical linkage. This sounds like the linkage or latch (the lock mechanism is in the latch) is binding on something. Take the door panel off and inspect the linkage and latch. You may have to take the latch out of the door to inspect it close enough.


5

I'm guessing water in the latch mechanism somewhere. Try displacing the water (when it's above freezing) with some WD-40, let it sit awhile, then lubing with a silicone based lube (not sure if that's the best option, but it's what comes to mind, would like to see other opinions on the best latch lube).


4

I would use spray trim adhesive as a first choice, it adheres very well and I have used it for such jobs. If I didn't have that available, I'd use gorilla glue for its waterproof and expanding properties (though a little more hassle than I'd like to put into it), or as a third option general spray adhesive.


4

We had the same problem on a late 2005 W169. Note you do not need to remove the door card if you just want to remove the door lock cylinder and exterior handle. Once you've loosened the bolt holding the cylinder accessed from the side of the door (On ours it was a T20 - T15 would work but there's a chance of rounding off the head) there is a catch above the ...


4

I have a Focus 2010 model and can confirm that Bobs advise is absolutely right. The same thing happened to me this evening when my passenger door when opened wouldn't latch in again (currently outside temp minus 5c). Just 10 seconds using a hair drier on the latch solved the problem for me. I also then sprayed the mechanism with WD40 for good measure. Had ...


4

It if was freezing outside, it was almost certainly colder inside the latch mechanism. It sounds like ice formed on the spring and / or the latch hinge. You were able to use the leverage of the door handle to move the latch against the friction of the ice but then the spring wasn't able to push it back. When something like this happens, I would suggest ...


3

Remove the inside door handle and see if the linkage is diconnected.You might be lucky and be able to reattach it if you can retrieve it from inside the door.If not remove the inside door panel you will find a rod has become diconnected between the inside door handle and the latch.It is possible that the handle broke or a retaining clip fell off allowing the ...


3

Even though we all laughed at him, a friend used the As-Seen-On-TV Suction cup dent puller and it actually popped the dent in his quarter panel. It is not perfect, but it did it to his satisfaction. You could also take the inside door panel off to be able to push it from the other side as well.


3

If you're getting enough moisture into the seal/door interface, the seals are already failing. It's time to replace them. However, if you want to hold it off for a little while, vaseline is fine. It'll slowly degrade the seals further, but well, they're already done for at this point... Best thing to do is to use silicone lube on the seals occasionally ...


2

There are really only two possibilities, or a combination of both. First, the motor may be failing. Over time, they get "tired" and will open and close sluggishly. Before your sunroof malfunctioned, did you notice it getting more sluggish over time? Opening, closing, or both? The second possibility is a physical obstruction. The click you are hearing ...


2

Essentially, you want to displace the potential condensation that will form after the air inside a warm car cools down. The best suggestion that I have heard is silicone based grease or sprays. Those will discourage the water from sticking around and, later, becoming ice. Anything that might react with rubber is definitely not recommended. This includes ...


2

For a preliminary inspection, I would arm the alarm, then walk around and pull on each door. If it doesn't go off, then you're probably looking at wiring. Bang on the metal of each door and see if you can make the light come on. Tug in the harness under the dash and the lower side kick panels in front of the doors and under the dash. The two most common ...


2

If this is only happening when the vehicle is in motion, I'd visually trace the wiring and look for a point where a wire or wire bundle is rubbing on something and has worn through the insulation. If it doesn't exhibit the problem when it's parked, it's going to be hard to track down with a multimeter or test light. Unless you can reproduce it by gently ...


2

I would imagine that, orn a car of that age, it ought to work fine. On a newer car the modules might not recognise each other, however you ought to be able to swap the control modules from the old doors to the new ones, so all the modules are still matched to the car. Mechanically, it is exactly as you describe, although you might find that some care is ...


1

I would assume not. Up here in Canada, our vehicle inspection is pretty lax, but Lambo-doors introduce a pretty big safety issue, and they are not allowed on the road. I have yet to see a kit that deals with the problem of a car that has been flipped. I believe that Lambo's have windshields that can be broken outwards in case of a rollover. Mercedes' ...


1

The history of the vehicle is always a good place to start with when assessing a vehicle fault. Can you contact the previous owner to ask if the interior door handles were disconnected for a particular purpose. A second option would be to look up an online parts catalogue for your vehicle and study it for a missing/broken lock part. Both doors being ...


1

It's the control cable (#10) that runs from the door handle / lock tab to the latch/lock assembly. It's discontinued, not a single one in dealer inventory in the entire United States. Vintage Parts does not have any either. I ended up grabbing one off of a wreck at the local Pick-n-Pull . Getting to it involves removing the door panel. Remove the screws ...


1

The Forte LX mode uses a cable setup to work the door locks. While the EX uses rods. It is possible but, it would take some work to figure out a way to connect the door handle (interior) to the lock assembly. Next you would have to find a way to provide these locks with power since the harness is not the same in both models. On the software side both Body ...


1

The door releases generally consist of a set of metal rods, and the usual cause of failure is one of these becoming detached - does the handle feel loose when you try and open it? I don't know the specifics for the Suzuki, but door cards are usually held on by a mixture of bolts/screws and clips. The trick is to actually find all the screws... There's ...


1

These parts are very rigid, which makes them delicate. You have to know where the clips are, and for most cars a putty knife or some kind of wedge will work. Once the clips are popped, you replaced any broken one, and reinstall. I can't speculate on the location of the clips for your particular vehicle, but you can usually tell by feeling around the part. Be ...


1

For the dust entry: The fabric you mention is probably insulation over the blower motor. It could be coming in from the outside to that location from the air intake in the cowl near the wipers on the passenger side. It's possible the seal around the cabin air filter is gone. There should be instructions for changing the cabin air filter in your owners ...


1

There should be a small clip to hold the end of the metal rod into the mechanism. They are usually made of either a bit of thin folded sheet metal, or moulded plastic, as shown in the circle at the bottom of this image (which appears to be for a Honda of some sort, but is the clearest Google came up with):


1

There are two different ways of doing that, so it depends which Toyota have used - Either there is a notch on the hinge itself, or it is part of the check strap. The latter is probably easier to check - between the hinges there should be a bar that is hinged at one end and slides at the other. It's main purpose is to sopt the door opening more than it ...


1

I had the same problem on my '98 GC and it turned out to be lock/sensor on the glass hatch door. By pulling the cover off the entire hatch, I could tweak the wires going into the sensor/lock assemblies. When I torqued the one on the glass door, it would go on and off. While I haven't found a good way to fix it yet, I was able to yank the wires off that ...


1

The sensor itself is only part of the equation. There is also: The wiring from the sensor to the computer module. The object that strikes the sensor (the door itself, or a striker on the door). If the sensor works consistently when you manually press it, then it tells me that it's not getting reliably pressed by the door when the door is closed. This ...



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