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9

I have lived under the impression that they will not bend as the entire surface of the door that touches the body would hit evenly at the same time along the entire surface. If you put a bar at a point on the surface near the hinge I imagine that the door would become damaged. damage I would worry about Door internals Window components and arms to raise ...


6

Suction is the answer. You can buy a suction grip in a hardware store, but if the dent is shallow enough (ie pushed in rather than really dented) a toilet plunger might do it.


6

If you're getting enough moisture into the seal/door interface, the seals are already failing. It's time to replace them. However, if you want to hold it off for a little while, vaseline is fine. It'll slowly degrade the seals further, but well, they're already done for at this point... Best thing to do is to use silicone lube on the seals occasionally ...


6

Roll the window up and pull the door panel, using various sized wood sticks (long ones for leverage) attempt to push or massage out as much of the dent as possible. You can gently use a hammer on the end of the wood stick to help with the stubborn parts, once you have done all you can do from inside pull the rest of the dent as best you can using a Dent ...


6

As discussed in another recent answer one good method for paint-less dent repair (which is really the only DIY type of dent repair) is to use glue on plastic dent tabs: These come in different shapes and size for differently shaped dents and are applied to the dented area with non-maring hot glue. They are pulled with a handle or slide hammer and can be ...


6

With difficulty ;) Remove the door card (interior trim) if it's not off already - this should reveal a number of holes in the inner skin of the door. Using a small mirror and a torch, try to work out where the wire has gone - it'll probably be in the most inconvenient place possible! You'll then need to use something to try and grab it - I'd recommend a ...


5

If you cannot manually lock the door, the power locks will not work because all it does is move the mechanical linkage. This sounds like the linkage or latch (the lock mechanism is in the latch) is binding on something. Take the door panel off and inspect the linkage and latch. You may have to take the latch out of the door to inspect it close enough.


5

I'm guessing water in the latch mechanism somewhere. Try displacing the water (when it's above freezing) with some WD-40, let it sit awhile, then lubing with a silicone based lube (not sure if that's the best option, but it's what comes to mind, would like to see other opinions on the best latch lube).


5

The fact that you can here some noise from the door with the inoperational lock is an indication that the wiring is fine. There is a good chance that the door lock actuator has gone bad and needs to be replaced.


5

Everybody will have a different answer to this question, depending on the money-value of the vehicle the sentimental-value of the vehicle how much longer are you planning to keep it when the time comes to get rid of it, are you planning to sell it or write it off how much damage is there on the door Basically, your options are: new door Probably in the ...


4

I have a Focus 2010 model and can confirm that Bobs advise is absolutely right. The same thing happened to me this evening when my passenger door when opened wouldn't latch in again (currently outside temp minus 5c). Just 10 seconds using a hair drier on the latch solved the problem for me. I also then sprayed the mechanism with WD40 for good measure. Had ...


4

It if was freezing outside, it was almost certainly colder inside the latch mechanism. It sounds like ice formed on the spring and / or the latch hinge. You were able to use the leverage of the door handle to move the latch against the friction of the ice but then the spring wasn't able to push it back. When something like this happens, I would suggest ...


4

We had the same problem on a late 2005 W169. Note you do not need to remove the door card if you just want to remove the door lock cylinder and exterior handle. Once you've loosened the bolt holding the cylinder accessed from the side of the door (On ours it was a T20 - T15 would work but there's a chance of rounding off the head) there is a catch above the ...


4

I would use spray trim adhesive as a first choice, it adheres very well and I have used it for such jobs. If I didn't have that available, I'd use gorilla glue for its waterproof and expanding properties (though a little more hassle than I'd like to put into it), or as a third option general spray adhesive.


4

What you are describing is generally caused by the door lock actuators wearing out. It's common on a lot of cars once they get some age on them. They are usually available aftermarket, and some can be a pain to swap out.


4

Referencing the photo it appears the retaining clip is still in place. At the 12 o'clock position you will notice a square shaped tag. Lifting the tab away from the bracket pry the clip in the direction of the small hole that the tab sat in. Again referencing the photo this would be going up. With the amount of corrosion visible I would try to wire brush ...


4

With the damage which is there, a suction cup dent puller is not going to do the job you are looking for it to do. If there was only "dent" damage, the suction cup can sometimes remove them. When you have creasing, pulls, dents, and paint transference, you are going to need a body shop to get this fixed. Alternatively, you could find a replacement door at ...


4

Try using some graphite lube on the lock cylinder before you give up on it. If you remove the lock cylinder, disassemble it, and clean it, you may improve it's function. You should also be able to get the lock cylinder re-keyed at the dealer or a locksmith prior to installation.


4

PROBLEM As you can see in the photo, on the lock actuator replacement part for my car door there is a plastic part (left) and a metal part (right). The two parts, metal and plastic, are supposed to move as one unit. If the unit is rotated anti-clockwise then the door lock will be in the locked position. If the door is rotated clockwise then the door would ...


4

The heated mirrors have a restive heat strip spiraled around the back of the mirror. It works much like the defrost "wires" on a rear car window but since its a mirror, you can't see them. The MkIII Jetta didn't have a control for the heated mirrors - they were always on, and would fail more often than the switched ones on newer cars, but failure does ...


4

You need to find a way to open the door, slim jim or other tool. Once the door is open you need to remove the lock cylinder to get the broken key out. Depending on the vehicle how hard or easy this is. The cylinder may have been damaged and would need replaced and re-pinned to your key, this would require a locksmith. If you can remove the lock cylinder ...


3

This is almost certainly one of the door 'pin switches' out of adjustment. Try making up a pad of some sort where the door shuts onto the switches. I have used stick on wheel weights quite effectively for this!.


3

Remove the inside door handle and see if the linkage is diconnected.You might be lucky and be able to reattach it if you can retrieve it from inside the door.If not remove the inside door panel you will find a rod has become diconnected between the inside door handle and the latch.It is possible that the handle broke or a retaining clip fell off allowing the ...


3

There are two different ways of doing that, so it depends which Toyota have used - Either there is a notch on the hinge itself, or it is part of the check strap. The latter is probably easier to check - between the hinges there should be a bar that is hinged at one end and slides at the other. It's main purpose is to sopt the door opening more than it ...


3

Okay I have lived through this and replacing the seals does need to happen when this becomes a problem. However, seals going bad are not always the problem. Sometimes it is simply a matter of the seals or the metal they contact got wet while the doors are open then you close them and they freeze. The down side here is this can also ruin the seals. The hands ...


3

Even though we all laughed at him, a friend used the As-Seen-On-TV Suction cup dent puller and it actually popped the dent in his quarter panel. It is not perfect, but it did it to his satisfaction. You could also take the inside door panel off to be able to push it from the other side as well.


3

There are really only two possibilities, or a combination of both. First, the motor may be failing. Over time, they get "tired" and will open and close sluggishly. Before your sunroof malfunctioned, did you notice it getting more sluggish over time? Opening, closing, or both? The second possibility is a physical obstruction. The click you are hearing ...


3

I've had central locking refusing to stay locked with several cars when any of the door sensors (or boot lid sensor, or even engine cover sensor) thinks its door is open - whether it's actually the case, or the sensor has jammed for some reason. This hypothesis can be checked by setting the interior lighting to the setting where it lights upon open doors. In ...


3

Follow Paulster2's comment is to get a perfect result. But prior to going to a body shop or going to the scrapyard, you might try this: As the dent looks really clean to me, another possibility might be to remove the inner door trims and push against the dent from the inside. You might be able to reach the dent from the inside without too much parts that ...


3

It sounds like either the solenoid that activates the lock has failed, or the linkage connecting them has come adrift, or there is a problem with the wiring going to the solenoid - the solenoid failing is usually the most common of these. You'll probably have to remove the door trim (either get a manual or look on youtube for a guide), in order to get ...



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