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5

The ball bearings are involved, but the noise isn't because they are dropping. What happens is when the boot splits, the grease starts oozing out (less lubricant) and dirt gets in causing wear. One of the jobs of grease is to take up excess slack in the joint (not that there is much in the first place when it's not worn out). This will quiet any noises out ...


5

Most likely problem is a stuck thermostat and a blown headgasket.


4

I found a copy of the owner's manual here. Pages 284-285 have a diagram of the instrument cluster, where this light appears as #17. Page 294 says that this is the Vehicle Security Light and explains: This light will flash at a fast rate for approximately 15 seconds, when the vehicle security alarm is arming, and then will flash slowly until the ...


4

It looks like you can tell by the vin. It appears to be asking engine code - that's the eighth digit. See if it matches the R or T shown in the part description there, and that should give you your answer.


3

If I were you, I'd just do it right and be done with it. Don't feel bad about the peeling paint as all of the Dodge/Chrysler products of the era did the same thing (GM had a phase of this as well ... I would bet Ford had its problems in this area to boot). The problem was (from my understanding) when manufacturers were required to go to water based paint to ...


2

Overdrive is misunderstood. The traditional definition is: a gear that drives the rear rotations to be lower than that of the crankshaft. That means you truck shouldn't go into 'overdrive' at 40mph. No car does this. At a higher speed, in order to conserve fuel, a car may go into overdrive. Knowing if your vehicle is actually going into overdrive, or ...


2

I'm not sure you have enough information here to go on. My best advice to you is, fix the wire and see if it fixes the problem. The wire needs to be fixed anyway, so fix it.


2

If the transmission is slipping now a rebuild will give you a slight gain in mpg. If you have the optional towing differential with a 3.92 ratio then changing to the standard 3.55 will also yield a small gain. This will hurt acceleration though, while increasing highway mileage. The biggest issue is "cost to benefit" ratio and the time to recoup those costs ...


2

Look at the manufacture date of your truck. If it is after June 2007, you can pretty much be assured you shouldn't have to worry about the TSB since it is dated 27 June 2007. This wouldn't be foolproof, but one would have to assume they wouldn't put the old problem into a new truck after that date, considering they knew about the issue prior to that date. ...


2

Before you go thinking the belt is out of time, when your mechanic told you about the wires, what he may have been suggesting is that you have the wires on the wrong plugs. This will create the imbalance you are talking about, yet most of the time will not show a trouble code (because they are all still firing, just not at the right time). Double check to ...


2

Paulster2 has covered the painting angle, so I would like to take a look at other alternatives. The only way to get the exact original look, with the same finish as on the other car panels is through a professional paint job. If doing a DIY job, this is just about impossible to get - so let's go wild and aim for something totally different. One option are ...


1

Yes. The rear sensor is used to calculate the difference in exhaust gas quality before and after the cat. In the simplest terms the ECM compares the voltages of the front and rear O2 sensors and if they're too similar, you get the P0420 code. Now, because the front sensor is giving faulty data to the ECM (P0133), the formula the ECM uses to calculate cat ...


1

Yes, the P0420 catalytic efficiency can be caused by a bad O2 sensor. But a P0133 refers to the front O2 sensor so things are a little more complicated than when people refer to a bad rear O2 sensor. Your front O2 sensor is probably bad (P0133) and your cat and/or your rear O2 sensor may be bad (P0420). One cheap test for the cat is using a laser ...


1

A few thoughts (in no particular order): It sounds like one or more cylinders are not firing You'll want to isolate the problematic cylinder(s). Assuming the car has run for a bit since the timing belt swap, you could try to inspect the spark plugs to see if any of them is wet or looks different from the rest. This should give you focus in on the problem ...


1

AC hoses generally have very long service life which, in my experience, usually exceed the life of the vehicle. If the system passes a vacuum and/or leak test then inspecting the outside is generally all that's needed to detect if there is any impending issues about to happen (hose wise). To determine their serviceability you should check for the following ...


1

The thrust bearing which is listed in some of the kits is a "nice to have", but isn't needed every time. They do not normally wear out, so replacing them is probably on a case-by-case basis. I'd take a look at the old thrust plate and see if there is any galling on it. If so, then replace the plate and the needle bearings. If it looks good with minimal wear ...


1

I had a similar problem some years ago and it turned out to be a blocked breather on the fuel tank. Next time it happens to you, provided you are somewhere that it's safe to do this, jump out of the car and pull the fuel filler cap off and listen around the neck of the fuel tank of a whooshing noise, as though air is being sucked into the tank. If this is ...


1

For your edification in case you want to try this. Here are the procedures for getting the vehicle to learn the new key. There are some disclaimers/actions you need to pay attention to, so read the entire procedure before you try to do this. If your key is a completely metal key, it will not have a chip inside of it. If it looks like the image below, it ...


1

It sounds as though your transmission is slipping or allowing the engine to rev. Once the transmission catches back up, it slams back into gear causing the jerk you are suggesting. This could easily be caused by a lack of (or low) transmission fluid.


1

The diagnostic systems in cars get upgraded every few years. It wasn't until the early 2000's that car manufacturers really started to integrate ways of displaying diagnostic info without an OBD scanner. Typically if it is not included in the shop manual it is not a feature on that car. Your best bet is to go to the local autoparts store or shop and have ...


1

When the tank is going to be completely filled the proper procedure is to allow the pump to shut off automatically. Add no more fuel after this initial shut off. Over filling the tank by filling to "the brim" can cause the evaporative emissions system to be damaged or rendered inoperative. The system is designed to control and process fuel vapor not liquid ...


1

This sound similar to what I have experienced when there is rust or other "crud" in the bottom of the gas tank. Letting it get VERY low then filling it will stir up the "crud" and allow it to temporarily clog things up until it settles back down. To confirm if this is whats happening, try filling up before the fuel level drops below half a tank. Do that a ...


1

It is probably going to be one of your pulley wheels, but I doubt it's the pump. If it's brand new, they usually don't make any noise at all. It is either going to be one of either the idler or tensioner pulleys. And if you don't know which one is which, if you eliminate all of the other pulleys which have things attached to them, you should have one ...


1

Two areas I think I'd look at: Did you put the right thermostat in (temperature wise)? And did it get put in the correct way? If a colder than normal thermostat was inserted, it could possibly cause this issue. If it was put in upside down, there would be a greater chance. One of the main things which is bothering me here is you saying engine temperature ...


1

Coolant coming out of the overflow is a sign of over-pressurisation. The cheapest cause of this is the pressure cap failing - have you replaced that? The other main causes of it are overheating, or gas getting into the system and so increasing the pressure, usually through a head gasket breach between a cylinder and the water jacket. Have you noticed any ...


1

The P0507 code refers to: A P0507 DTC trouble code may be caused by one or more of the following: A vacuum leak Leaking air intake after the throttle body EGR valve leaking vacuum A faulty positive crankcase ventilation (PCV) valve Damaged/failed/dirty throttle body Failed EVAP system Failed IAC (idle air controller) or faulty IAC circuit Things to ...


1

There will be a sensor switch in the door jam, check that it can move freely and lubricate it if necessary. Also check its wiring for chaffed insulation or a corroded connector


1

Take the starter off, take it down to your nearest AutoZone/O'Reilly's/Checker/etc. auto parts store and have them bench check it for you. I'll bet your solenoid is no longer functioning, and therefor your starter has quit working.


1

I would check the fuel pump actually. It might be getting too hot, causing it to not put out the proper pressure. The only way to test this (that I'm aware of) is while it's running. You'd have to put a pressure gauge on it (at the rail) and check the fuel pressure while running. You'd then need to leave the gauge in place, somewhere you can see it while ...


1

For me, it was the brake light housing on both sides. MY OPINION...this is a crappy design! The 3 little points, once you twist on the housing, barely makes proper contact. I had to rig up something to make better contacts.



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