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27

Inside the car: Manual: Check the manual for the service history. Was it services regularly at a authorized dealership? Ash tray: Smells like cigarettes? The previous owner was a smoker, dealbreaker for me personally. Interior: Does the amount of wear correspond with the expected amount of wear for a car of that age and mileage? Trunk: Spare tire ...


13

These are things I check before buying a car (in addition to Alex's advice): Make sure it has radiator fluid (at a proper level). If the radiator fluid is empty, it probably has a radiator leak, they probably have not been watching it, and the engine probably has heat damage. The thermometer won't work without radiator fluid so they won't see that the car ...


9

I'm surprised this has not been mentioned. Have a compression test performed on the engine. This will expose many major engine problems like head gasket leaks, damaged valves/valve lands or rings. It is a simple, inexpensive test that can save you from some of the most expensive repairs a vehicle may need. I would consider a compression test absolutely ...


9

As an everyday buyer you won't be interested in the high performance end of diesel or petrol, so here goes: Diesel engines typically rev lower and have more low speed torque - so you are less likely to stall off the line, for example. Petrol engines usually rev higher and get more power at 3-4 thousand revs Diesel seems to be getting more expensive - ...


9

It's a Diesel, which means that you usually have a high detergent oil in an engine that dumps combustion by-products like soot into the oil as part of its normal operation. Given the age of the vehicle I'm not surprised that the oil has noticeably darkened after 10 miles - one of the older Diesels I owned a while back did that during the time it took to run ...


8

A glow plug is essentially a resister and is tested the same way: Disconnect wire to the plug. Remove the plug. Clean the thread of the plug to make for a good test connection. Use an ohm meter to check the resistance between the thread and the connector. Resistance should be below 6 ohms or so. It may be very small (under 1 ohm). High resistance or ...


8

Despite any opinions of safety it seems that gas tanks are manufactured to not accept more than 95% of their total volume because of regulations. Here is a quote from the US Department of Transportation Federal Motor Carry Safety Administration Regulation 393.67 Subpart E. (12) Overfill restriction. A liquid fuel tank manufactured on or after January 1, ...


7

Another difference is that the diesel engines cost more to produce and to maintain. So the diesel version is almost certainly more expensive to buy than the equivalent petrol car, and it usually costs a bit more in servicing. So the rule of the thumb is to buy diesel if you're going to drive more than ~10000km per year or so, depending on fuel costs, taxes ...


6

Besides the weight, be sure that you buy oil with one of the "C" codes in the service symbol. The top half of the ring should say "API Service C-something". Update: The Logo looks like this one:


6

Be aware that a diesel head gasket is not necessarily a job for an amateur. It is generally not as straight forward as a gasoline engine head gasket. You may need special tools that many amateurs lack -- a torque wrench, for sure. Be sure to consult a repair manual for your particular engine. Some VW diesel engines will have multiple head gaskets ...


6

Most modern diesel engines (ie: engines after mid-80s) require some electricity to run because they are electronically controlled. This is due to computers controlling the fuel charge and monitoring of the engine itself. Without this, the diesel engine has no control. They also require electricity to power the primary fuel pump, to move the fuel from the ...


5

You should look for subsidies in your country for diesel, that might make owning an diesel vehicle (and the related extra maintenance costs it brings with it) worthwhile. In India, we usually get a number around 100kms / per day. If your daily commute is greater than that, diesel is economical. Running comforts: you should know that you can't (or shouldn't) ...


5

In short, diesel engines tend to be more reliable and more robust. They're also far more fuel efficient than their petrol counterparts. Also, diesel engines may be down on power but what they lose in power they make up for in torque. Torque is more noticeable in an urban environment because of the stop and go nature of traffic. You need quick acceleration ...


5

Because diesel engines are so much simpler than petrol engines, servicing them is a lot easier. There's no spark plugs or timing to worry about, no mixture to set, none of it. All you need to do is ensure that the fuel and air filters are clean, and change the oil and oil filter regularly. Timing belts are a little more complicated to do because they ...


5

I drive 2 1984 Topaz's and one 1985 Topaz daily. The part in your photo is actually the electric vacuum pump. It supplies the vacuum for the brake booster, cruise control, and the injection pump timing. Unplugging it was the cause of the smoke. The IP has a built in cold start mechanism that uses the vacuum to adjust the injection pump timing depending on ...


5

By far the most common cause of failure of the gasket is overheating. So why would it overheat? Check for coolant leaks in the following engine gaskets water pump radiator pipes Also check for oil leaks or low oil - these can have knock on overheating effects. Check your radiator isn't full of sludge - that could be a cause of the problem, or it could ...


5

To add to what others have said, diesel lube oil (the code starts with "C", like "CJ") is formulated to hold lots of soot, and after 10,000 miles, there probably was a lot of soot in the remaining oil that got mixed in with the new oil. When changing your own, never put "S" (for "spark") rated oil in a diesel engine!


4

I agree with calling the local Toyota shop and seeing if someone in the service dept will help you out. If they don't help you then I know that at the winter temps you see 0w40 is what everyone I have ever talked to or read on other forums run in their diesels in your region.


4

Yes but as of present there are no US based tuners that provide a DPF delete kit or engine tuning (reprogramming) to allow the safe removal of this device. They exist overseas in the UK and Europe but I would hold off until someone in the US provides a product specific to the US car. Also the US spec 335d uses a DEF (diesel exhaust fluid, adblue, urea ...


4

Pinhole leaks in the low-pressure lines from the tank to the pump can cause this - the pump sucks in air through the hole instead of fuel from the tank. Check the condition of all the fuel lines, and the connections between rubber flexis and solid lines. Check any seals on the filter for the same reason.


4

The key differences between petrol and diesel engines is the method of combustion. Petrol ignites with sparks or with compression. Diesel doesn't ignite so well, but burns much better through compression. Petrol engines inject the air/fuel mixture and then use spark plugs to ignite the mixture just after a piston reaches top dead centre. Diesel engines ...


4

As far as general mechanic info there's a ton of good information on here, and all over the web. I've found a lot of instructional YouTube videos on many of the things I've done myself. For Jetta specific information there's a good group of people over at the VW Vortex forums that can probably help you figure out anything you'd need to know. Most of the ...


3

A point I haven't seen mentioned here: diesels will last a lot longer -- often twice the lifetime or more of a gas engine. That might not seem to matter if you "flip" vehicles every few years, but because of that lifetime, even used diesels tend to have higher resale value -- sometimes MUCH higher! I've seen a Dodge 250 gas pickup for $500, but the Cummins ...


3

It was crud in the fuel pickup tube. First, I switched a jerry can into the fuel line and the engine (after priming) ran perfectly. Then, I used a priming bulb to force air back into the tank. It took several vigorous squeezes to blow the crud back into the tank from the pickup tube (and possibly the tank selector valves and the other lines.)


3

Does the gauge ever read less than maximum? If not, I would suspect a bad gauge or sender. EDIT to follow-up on comments: check for a kink or other problem in the wire. The wire from my oil temperature sender passes over a piece of plastic sticking up from the drip tray. Over time, I lost one wire to relentless wear - rubbing clean through the insulation ...


3

Everything S_Niles says is correct, but you can save yourself some hassle by checking the resistance before you remove the glowplug(s) from the engine blocks, by touching one end of your ohm meter to the end of the glowplug (after removing the wire/harness from the glowplug), and the other to your engine block. Do this to all of your glowplugs. The ...


3

call your local toyota dealership and ask them. Over the years, they may have changed their recommended fluid types.


3

A good trick is to put a small mark on the filter, e.g. a scratch or bit of marker pen that you can identify, but isn't obvious. When you get the car back, check to see that the mark is gone (i.e. they have changed the filter). If the mark is still there, you still have the old filter, and you know you've been screwed...


3

Two possibilities occur to me: a too-large turbo or a too-loose wastegate. when I press the accelerator there is no power until the rpm tachometer reaches 2500 This almost sounds like the replacement turbo is too large. when I press the accelerator there is no power until the rpm tachometer reaches 2500, then I need to release the accelerator ...


3

Four months went by between when you last ran the vehicle (December) and when you tried to start it (April). Just like gasoline, diesel fuel can also "gel" and clog up your fuel filters. As a first, low-cost troubleshooting step, change both of your fuel filters. You can use some starting fluid to try and start the vehicle after changing the filters. If ...



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