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9

Honestly, I have worked at three different types of places. First, it was aquick lube place in California. These can be good, if they have good management. The bad comes in when you have bad management, and they can "sell" things and not do them. These focus mostly on services they sell, and really glance at all other things. Second, it was a place like ...


7

At least in the United States you are not required to use the dealer for service,parts or repairs to maintain your warranty. You will be required to have the warranty work done at the dealer except in extenuating circumstances,(like the nearest dealer is 150 miles away) but you must still contact them first. If they deny a warranty claim on the basis of non ...


4

I'm an ex Ford IT guy. Ford as well as all US auto makers are required to keep track of warranty related services and/or things that may effect warranty claims and the safety of people in the vehicle. In the US, it's a federal law called the TREAD ACT. The TREAD ACT is the US government's oversight on safety related claims made by consumers against auto ...


4

If you've never done your own work, I wouldn't recommend the first two as your first venture. You should make your own call, of course. The third sounds fishy and I wouldn't address it at all without a clearer understanding of what they're trying to sell you. Just from looking these items over, they look like scheduled maintenance. Those types of tasks ...


3

If the independent service shop is doing good work, the items you've mentioned certainly don't need the attention of a Kawasaki dealer. It's pretty much all standard stuff and you don't need normally need any special Kawasaki tools for either. I'm tempted to say that an independent shop tends to live by its reputation more than a main dealer, so you'll get ...


3

"Repairs" may be the wrong term, these are more preventative maintenance. These particular items are some that there's a lot of debate in regards to whether or not they're worthwhile. They may be on some particular models, but not others. Power steering flush is not something I ever hear of people doing anymore. However, I'm not a Ford guy, could be ...


2

Here's the maintenance schedule for you vehicle. I don't see any of the suggestions listed and they sound like solutions to problems you don't have. If something is wrong, fix it, but I would ask the dealer what problem you have that these suggestions are supposed to fix? If they were truly preventative, they'd be in the Ford service schedule.


1

Why not change the oil yourself? It is a very easy task and allows you to become a little more familiar with your new CRV. You save a few dollars, get the pride of working on your own car, and become more knowledgeable about the specifics of your vehicle. It usually doesn't take more than 30 mins to change your own oil. It's done with nearly all hand ...


1

1) Power steering flush - Most car comes with lifetime no need to change unless leak. Open the reservoir and see if it is dirty. I have not changed with my 1999 240K Miles MB C230 and I am still OK. Whoever I talked to about that, they said not required cars on later models. Same thing applies for Brake Fluid, and Transmission Fluid 2) Fuel Filter - ...


1

They all have their own computer system that keep track of the maintenance made at the dealer. I have a Toyota and with my VIN number they are able to track down any events (repair, recall, etc...) that happened at a Toyota Dealer. Obviously they cannot tell anything outside their dealers network. Maybe the Ford's OASIS system is shared with any authorized ...



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