Hot answers tagged

12

It is typically faster, easier, and more reliable to replace a bad part with a new part. The dealership wants to the vehicle to leave the shop in the best possible condition that they can guarantee is going to work and last. The best way to do this is to replace a bad part with a new part. They prefer not to repair parts, because a repaired part will ...


9

Honestly, I have worked at three different types of places. First, it was aquick lube place in California. These can be good, if they have good management. The bad comes in when you have bad management, and they can "sell" things and not do them. These focus mostly on services they sell, and really glance at all other things. Second, it was a place like ...


8

At least in the United States you are not required to use the dealer for service,parts or repairs to maintain your warranty. You will be required to have the warranty work done at the dealer except in extenuating circumstances,(like the nearest dealer is 150 miles away) but you must still contact them first. If they deny a warranty claim on the basis of non ...


6

The dealerships I worked at would take it off at the request of the customer. It's simple you're the customer and the salesman isn't going to lose a sale over the sticker. If you have already bought the car or just aren't comfortable asking them to do it you can DIY by following this post.


5

If you've never done your own work, I wouldn't recommend the first two as your first venture. You should make your own call, of course. The third sounds fishy and I wouldn't address it at all without a clearer understanding of what they're trying to sell you. Just from looking these items over, they look like scheduled maintenance. Those types of tasks ...


4

Most do, yes - It is free advertising for them. Round here it is usually a sticker in the rear window, but I have seen some dealers put something on the back panel. They also put their details on the licence plate (a legal requirement in the UK for anyone supplying plates) I suspect that if you asked them not to, the sales person would say "Yeah, sure", ...


4

I'm an ex Ford IT guy. Ford as well as all US auto makers are required to keep track of warranty related services and/or things that may effect warranty claims and the safety of people in the vehicle. In the US, it's a federal law called the TREAD ACT. The TREAD ACT is the US government's oversight on safety related claims made by consumers against auto ...


4

Dealer franchise contracts spell out what is allowed for parts replacement and repair standards. In all the cases I am aware of the OEMs insist on use of factory parts for all repairs made. Most OEMs inspect for compliance regularly. Dealers will at times install non OEM parts but this is rare as the consequences when found out can be severe and include ...


3

One reason for this is to simplify and standardise maintenance. Replacing a part with like for like can be a known and understood process which also allows traceability. This is of particular importance to manufacturers who might be have potential legal liability for millions of vehicles (in terms of both warranty and liability for dangerous faults) ...


3

"Repairs" may be the wrong term, these are more preventative maintenance. These particular items are some that there's a lot of debate in regards to whether or not they're worthwhile. They may be on some particular models, but not others. Power steering flush is not something I ever hear of people doing anymore. However, I'm not a Ford guy, could be ...


3

If the independent service shop is doing good work, the items you've mentioned certainly don't need the attention of a Kawasaki dealer. It's pretty much all standard stuff and you don't need normally need any special Kawasaki tools for either. I'm tempted to say that an independent shop tends to live by its reputation more than a main dealer, so you'll get ...


2

Advantage being that if they spot a problem while doing the oil change that they are a LOT more likely to have appropriate parts on hand. A non-dealer shop would have to source the parts, adding more time to the job (and possibly even another trip to the shop).


2

I will tell you with 100% certainty that Toyota can and will, typically happily! pull any and all service records of any work performed on your used vehicle that was performed at a Toyota dealership. If you are asking the potential seller(dealership) to give you the service records then you have received the standard sales answer for every dealership in ...


2

Here's the maintenance schedule for you vehicle. I don't see any of the suggestions listed and they sound like solutions to problems you don't have. If something is wrong, fix it, but I would ask the dealer what problem you have that these suggestions are supposed to fix? If they were truly preventative, they'd be in the Ford service schedule.


2

The Lojack is what is called the "aftermarket" in the automotive sales world. This is just one way a dealership will try to rip you off when purchasing a new (or used, for that matter) vehicle. When I say "rip you off," I'm not saying that the product doesn't work as advertised, as I'm sure it does. What I'm saying is, they mark up the price on such items to ...


2

I suspect it's partly a case of covering themselves - if they do a quick fix and it goes wrong (e.g. that patch they put on the coolant line fails and the resulting loss of coolant blows the engine), they'd probably get sued - it might well be that they'd be at risk of losing their franchise as well, which would differentiate them from non-dealers who don't ...


1

Yes it is reasonable. Remember, you only agreed to the cost of disassembly, which was the initial cost of $375. Taking things apart is usually far easier than putting them back together. Considering what is in their list of repairs, there was more than just the valve cover removed to figure out the issues. I'll almost guarantee you they removed the head as ...


1

Refuse to pay - they're trying to coerce you to use their services... On most cars, removing the cam cover is a 5 minute operation, and replacing it would be similar. Even a really complicated one isn't going to take more than half an hour, unless loads of stuff needs to be removed to get to it. I'd therefore consider 1-2 hours labour (at however much your ...


1

LoJack can only be installed by authorized installers. The price of installation is fairly consistent. OnStar and other similar services offer a similar feature set, but are not necessarily as secure. OnStar now offers an aftermarket upfit system that can be installed into any car or truck (not available for motorcycles/scooters, while LoJack is). A "...


1

Why not change the oil yourself? It is a very easy task and allows you to become a little more familiar with your new CRV. You save a few dollars, get the pride of working on your own car, and become more knowledgeable about the specifics of your vehicle. It usually doesn't take more than 30 mins to change your own oil. It's done with nearly all hand tools....


1

1) Power steering flush - Most car comes with lifetime no need to change unless leak. Open the reservoir and see if it is dirty. I have not changed with my 1999 240K Miles MB C230 and I am still OK. Whoever I talked to about that, they said not required cars on later models. Same thing applies for Brake Fluid, and Transmission Fluid 2) Fuel Filter - ...


1

They all have their own computer system that keep track of the maintenance made at the dealer. I have a Toyota and with my VIN number they are able to track down any events (repair, recall, etc...) that happened at a Toyota Dealer. Obviously they cannot tell anything outside their dealers network. Maybe the Ford's OASIS system is shared with any authorized ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible