New answers tagged

1

You need to get this car to a Mechanic ASAP. Even though you keep an eye on the gauge. By the time the gauge is in the danger zone the damage has already been done. Spent the bucks now to fix it and save a bundle on the chance that thing Blows a gasket..........


5

Its not good to run with low coolant, even worse to run with no coolant. Actually it can be quite disastrous (possibilities include blown head gaskets, seized pistons and a number of expensive repairs), but many times this is a result of a leaky radiator cap which is easy (and cheap) to replace. Someone already mentioned the dyes for detecting leaks, but ...


4

If you can't see any obvious signs of leaks, or steam coming from anywhere if you run the engine, a likely cause is a cracked cylinder head gasket, which is letting the coolant into the cylinders and out of the tail pipe as steam. That could soon cause a lot more damage than the hassle carrying a water container in the car to top up the radiator. Personal ...


17

"Is it safe to continue driving with low coolant as long as I continue to watch the temperature gauge? " No, the temp sensor reads coolant temperature, if the coolant gets low enough to be below the temp sensor, now the sensor is reading metal temperature of the area it is screwed into (usually cylinder head), by the time it reads too hot on the gauge the ...


9

If you do not have any leaks, then your coolant is most likely getting burned and/or going into your oil. My guess is going to be a problem with your head gasket or some crack or warping in the head. I believe coolant in oil used to turn oil more brown and make it more foamy or milky. These days, the detergents and dispersants in modern oil can reduce ...


7

First, you do need to find out where the coolant is going. There is UV dye that can help with this, and if your car is smoking, that could be a sign that the coolant is leaking into the engine rather than on the ground. For the main question, "Is it safe", as long as you keep an eye on the temperature and it's not getting too high, you should be OK in the ...


2

Clear water is not a sign of requiring a flush. It might be a sign that you need some anti-freeze... Brownish water or any other color that is not the normal color of your coolant could potentially benefit from a flush. Plain water in our engine could potentially cause problems: Water will boil over and not cool the engine sufficiently. Danger of rust if ...


3

A thermocouple merely generates voltage according to the temperature, while an automotive thermostat is basically an autonomous temperature sensitive coolant valve. You can't replace a thermostat with a thermocouple because their functions are completely different. You could replace a coolant sensor with a thermocouple, but resistive sensors are more ...


2

What stands out the most is that the coolant is brown. I have never heard of a coolant that is supposed to be brown. They are generally a yellowish green. It sounds like you need to replace the coolant, and then see where your gauge goes. For a specific car, without a specific temperature label, it's hard to know if that reading is too high or not. Perhaps ...


0

I had the same problem with my car and finally it was the Thermostat who was the culprit, it was not working properly and due to that even when the engine was heating up it did't start the Cooling fan and then ended up with the lots of heat and pressure and due to that coolalnt fluid overflows. Now I got the Thermostat replaced and its first day and i ...


2

It could be a stuck or blocked radiator cap. Did you change the cap at any stage? If the level in the coolant reservoir fails to rise and fall with engine temperature that could be a clue.


1

If the pressure relief valve was (or still is) stuck, as well as the thermostat, quite likely you have weakened all the hoses. Or, they are all dying of old age, though three in quick succession seems an unlikely coincidence. Pragmatically, after 3 failures I would replace all the hoses and clips, plus I would test the relief valve is opening at the correct ...


2

A leaking head gasket can lead to exhaust pressurizing the cooling system. This will generally fail the current weakest link in your cooling system. As you replace one component, the next weakest component will fail.


10

Remember that the reliability of any system of components will only be as strong as the weakest link. Coolant lines are pressurized under regular operation and the walls of the hoses will weaken with many, many heat cycles. It is expected that a coolant leak will spring at the weakest point of the system. The moment you replace this hose, the weakest point ...


11

I believe (and this is a gut check) you can chalk this up to deteriorated hoses which all have gone bad in the same period of time (coincidence). Each has probably served a long fruitful life and now it's time for replacement. Especially considering where you live and overheating as well, this does not seem unreasonable to me. I'd suggest if you have any ...



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