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19

If the thermostat is operating properly the radiator will only come into play when the thermostat opens, when the engine is at normal operating temperature (around 190 degrees, give or take). Adding a gigantic radiator won't make a bit of difference because if the engine gets too cold, the thermostat will close, causing the engine to heat up again. In the ...


12

I would like to drive the car to the nearest qualified service, but there is a fair distance to it (about 8km) as I'm living in a remote location. Is it safe to drive it that distance if I refill the entire coolant tank? I would say yes, you can drive the car. Load the car with much more water than you think necessary: I find that two liter ...


9

It sounds like the engine thermostat has failed in an open state. The thermostat regulates the flow of coolant between the radiator and the engine. When the engine needs more heat, it closes and cuts-off flow through the radiator. When the engine needs less heat, it opens and allows flow to the radiator. With the thermostat stuck open, the flow through ...


7

First thing I'd try to figure out is how quickly it leaks - run it, stick your head underneath it as check if there is any visible leaking. If there is, chances are that it's not going to make it for 30 miles. I'd also check for any evidence of oil and water mixing. If there is, don't drive it. If it's not leaking that badly I'd be tempted to top it up with ...


6

First thing is to initially determine if you're burning it or leaking it. Assuming your car isn't spewing a plume of white smoke when you're driving - you will have to do some additional diagnosis to determine the method of consumption. First check the oil and coolant - if either contain a milky substance you have a cracked something or a blown HG. ...


6

The thinner radiator might make it easier for the cold air to flow through the engine compartment. (The radiator itself wont cool an already cool engine at all if the thermostat is intact.) In cold environments it is often necessary to use a grille cover to limit cold air flow to the engine. Grille covers are especially necessary with small diesel engines ...


6

I agree with Timo - if it is a big enough leak that you can see it clearly, then getting the car transported is much safer. In general, using water as coolant is OK for a short time or as a "get you home" alternative, but it does not have the anti-freeze and corrosion inhibiting properties of a proper coolant mix, so should not be left in the engine for ...


6

The cooling system is sealed and pressurized, so under ideal conditions, nothing goes in or out. "Drying" is simply evaporation followed by the carrying away of the evaporated water by air. In reality, there is a slight opportunity for evaporation out of the overflow tank, which is not sealed/pressurized on many vehicles, but as the coolant in there is much ...


6

I'm assuming that this person was advocating putting a small amount of dish soap in the water used to do a coolant system flush. I would not do this to my car as routine/preventative maintenance, I would simply use water for a flush. My concern would be that any dish soap residue remaining in the system may adversely affect the chemistry of the coolant, ...


5

First, if it runs hotter during slower speeds (the 25mph-50mph you mention), I would think this is a sign that you're not getting enough airflow through the radiator. This might be a fan issues, but it might also be some other obstruction that prevents sufficient airflow. You said you hit a deer and had the radiator replaced as a result. I would check or ...


5

Your coolant shouldn't be boiling at 100C/212F if you have a proper mixture of water and anti-freeze (typically 50/50 ratio is recommended). Water's boiling point is 100C/212F. Even though it is called anti-freeze, it also raises the boiling of the water. You can buy a coolant mixture tester for a few dollars at a local auto parts store, you suck some of ...


5

It could be your thermostat - if it is not reading temperatures properly it may not trigger your fan until temperatures get really high. Being stationary with the engine running is usually the time when this can happen, as there is no cooling airflow until the fan comes on. Run the engine with the bonnet (hood for US-ians) and see when the fan starts - is ...


5

Without water and without antifreeze or just without antifreeze? I'll assume that you mean without either, but you should clarify the difference in the future. This is really simple though. The engine will overheat, quickly, and the seals and gaskets will give out, letting fluids leak in and out of places they should or shouldn't be. Eventually, parts of ...


5

Because the coolant stops circulating when the engine is turned off, the engine actually keeps getting hotter for a while after the engine has been turned off. If the engine gets hot enough (above 112 degrees Celsius/ 230 Fahrenheit) the aluminium cylinder head can start warping, causing uneven pressure on your head gasket, causing it to blow the next time ...


5

Get rid of the extra fans. If you're having to run fans constantly to keep the engine at the right temperature in the city, then all you're doing is masking another issue. You probably have several other issues. The engine temperature and the transmission going being able to shift into overdrive should be independent. It seems like you are conflating two ...


5

It's certainly not recommended, but I don't think it will ruin it, as long as you don't leave it in for too long... Flush the coolant system thoroughly to get rid of all traces of contaminants, and refill with proper coolant - it might be worth then doing another flush a few days later if you're worried.


4

You can see the corrosion on the pipe around the clip - even if Radweld or similar is able to temporarily stop the leak, I doubt that it'll last very long. At the rate that it's leaking, there is bound to be a bunch of fairly sizeable holes corroded into the pipe. For that reason alone I would change out the pipe as soon as I could. If that breaks (worst ...


4

If you think there is a leak and have 30 miles drive, then you can reserve some pure water with ride and use it. pure water is not alternative for radiator coolant, because water will be boil quicker than coolant. but its far better than running empty coolant. One more thing if you are living in cold area do not keep water inside radiator long ,It will ...


4

The 3.8 Natural Aspirated Engine was a rather solid design and were rarely known to blow head gaskets. Their weak point seemed to be the plastic Intake Manifold. Here are the three possible causes to your issue. If you are 100% sure that it's oil in the coolant then remove the intake manifold and check the Intake Manifold Gaskets upper and lower for any ...


4

Single digit temperatures would not freeze your coolant assuming it has antifreeze mixed in appropriately and isn't just water. Since you went from 250 to 150 within seconds I would assume something was blocking the flow of fluid. Thermostat staying shut would be the most likely culprit. It could be that the cold weather is pushing a failing thermostat ...


4

The heater core is part of continuous loop of engine coolant propelled via the water pump, flowing through caverns in the engine, through pipes that run through the firewall into the heater core, back out the firewall, and finally through the radiator. If the thermostat dictates it (due to a temperature limit being reached), the fan blows air over the ...


4

tl;dr: Your radiator cap might be working as advertised and releasing a bit of overpressure. The difference is points one and two is telling. In point two, you're explicitly staying out of boost on the turbo. Steady state cruising really doesn't require the turbo to spin up. In point one, you're explicitly relying on the turbo quite a bit. This is going ...


4

If you are losing coolant (you say you have to add coolant daily), then there are only two places it can go. Either on the ground or in the engine. Check your oil to see if it's a milky color. If it is, then the oil and coolant are mixing and you will need the engine rebuilt. If not, then you probably won't need to replace the engine. Next, does the exhaust ...


4

It sounds very much like you've blown a head gasket. Even with a new vehicle such as yours, this is not unheard of. There are only two ways you'll get white smoke that I'm aware of, those being a blown head gasket or it sucking up automatic transmission fluid. A head gasket is much more common. I'm sure this thing is still under warranty, so get it down to ...


3

When I've had overheating problems and unable to get it fixed or checked out immediately, driving with the heat on full blast (yes, in the summer) is an excellent way to reduce the engine temperature and get you to where you need to go without damaging your engine.


3

My first suggestion would be to give the system a good flush, as that can cure no end of maladies. Drain the system fully (check your Haymes Manual for any obscure drain points), then use a hose to flush it through backwards (i.e. the opposite direction to the normal flow) until the water comes out clear. It is usually easier to do rad and engine seperately. ...


3

Hook your temp sender up to a meter and drop it in some boiling water. This should tell you if it's working or not. Personally, I'd just disconnect it until you get the issue figured out -- running the fans continuously isn't going to hurt anything, it'll just be loud.


3

Don't be discouraged by a new part not working. My family runs a shop, and we get defective parts all the time. There is a table located here that shows diagnostic steps you can take. It's for a 1999 model, but 1999-2001 are virtually the same (I own a 2001 G/T model).


3

This actually ended up being a very simple problem. Something so simple that I'm almost in disbelief. My car has been running nearly straight antifreeze.(I'd say about 90% anyway) Everyone I'd talked to locally has said it should run even cooler doing that... but they're wrong. I emptied my expansion tank(not the radiator itself) and filled it with ...


3

The thermostat controls the temperature in the engine. It opens at a set temp, 195 degrees for example and allows coolant to flow through the radiator. If it's stuck open it would allow coolant to circulate through the radiator all the time not allowing the car to heat up properly. The complaint usually is the heater isn’t warm enough. If the thermostat ...



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