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18

If the thermostat is operating properly the radiator will only come into play when the thermostat opens, when the engine is at normal operating temperature (around 190 degrees, give or take). Adding a gigantic radiator won't make a bit of difference because if the engine gets too cold, the thermostat will close, causing the engine to heat up again. In the ...


11

I would like to drive the car to the nearest qualified service, but there is a fair distance to it (about 8km) as I'm living in a remote location. Is it safe to drive it that distance if I refill the entire coolant tank? I would say yes, you can drive the car. Load the car with much more water than you think necessary: I find that two liter ...


9

It sounds like the engine thermostat has failed in an open state. The thermostat regulates the flow of coolant between the radiator and the engine. When the engine needs more heat, it closes and cuts-off flow through the radiator. When the engine needs less heat, it opens and allows flow to the radiator. With the thermostat stuck open, the flow through ...


6

The thinner radiator might make it easier for the cold air to flow through the engine compartment. (The radiator itself wont cool an already cool engine at all if the thermostat is intact.) In cold environments it is often necessary to use a grille cover to limit cold air flow to the engine. Grille covers are especially necessary with small diesel engines ...


6

First thing I'd try to figure out is how quickly it leaks - run it, stick your head underneath it as check if there is any visible leaking. If there is, chances are that it's not going to make it for 30 miles. I'd also check for any evidence of oil and water mixing. If there is, don't drive it. If it's not leaking that badly I'd be tempted to top it up with ...


6

The cooling system is sealed and pressurized, so under ideal conditions, nothing goes in or out. "Drying" is simply evaporation followed by the carrying away of the evaporated water by air. In reality, there is a slight opportunity for evaporation out of the overflow tank, which is not sealed/pressurized on many vehicles, but as the coolant in there is much ...


6

I'm assuming that this person was advocating putting a small amount of dish soap in the water used to do a coolant system flush. I would not do this to my car as routine/preventative maintenance, I would simply use water for a flush. My concern would be that any dish soap residue remaining in the system may adversely affect the chemistry of the coolant, ...


5

I agree with Timo - if it is a big enough leak that you can see it clearly, then getting the car transported is much safer. In general, using water as coolant is OK for a short time or as a "get you home" alternative, but it does not have the anti-freeze and corrosion inhibiting properties of a proper coolant mix, so should not be left in the engine for ...


5

It could be your thermostat - if it is not reading temperatures properly it may not trigger your fan until temperatures get really high. Being stationary with the engine running is usually the time when this can happen, as there is no cooling airflow until the fan comes on. Run the engine with the bonnet (hood for US-ians) and see when the fan starts - is ...


5

Your coolant shouldn't be boiling at 100C/212F if you have a proper mixture of water and anti-freeze (typically 50/50 ratio is recommended). Water's boiling point is 100C/212F. Even though it is called anti-freeze, it also raises the boiling of the water. You can buy a coolant mixture tester for a few dollars at a local auto parts store, you suck some of ...


5

First thing is to initially determine if you're burning it or leaking it. Assuming your car isn't spewing a plume of white smoke when you're driving - you will have to do some additional diagnosis to determine the method of consumption. First check the oil and coolant - if either contain a milky substance you have a cracked something or a blown HG. ...


5

Without water and without antifreeze or just without antifreeze? I'll assume that you mean without either, but you should clarify the difference in the future. This is really simple though. The engine will overheat, quickly, and the seals and gaskets will give out, letting fluids leak in and out of places they should or shouldn't be. Eventually, parts of ...


4

First, if it runs hotter during slower speeds (the 25mph-50mph you mention), I would think this is a sign that you're not getting enough airflow through the radiator. This might be a fan issues, but it might also be some other obstruction that prevents sufficient airflow. You said you hit a deer and had the radiator replaced as a result. I would check or ...


4

You can see the corrosion on the pipe around the clip - even if Radweld or similar is able to temporarily stop the leak, I doubt that it'll last very long. At the rate that it's leaking, there is bound to be a bunch of fairly sizeable holes corroded into the pipe. For that reason alone I would change out the pipe as soon as I could. If that breaks (worst ...


4

Single digit temperatures would not freeze your coolant assuming it has antifreeze mixed in appropriately and isn't just water. Since you went from 250 to 150 within seconds I would assume something was blocking the flow of fluid. Thermostat staying shut would be the most likely culprit. It could be that the cold weather is pushing a failing thermostat ...


3

Don't be discouraged by a new part not working. My family runs a shop, and we get defective parts all the time. There is a table located here that shows diagnostic steps you can take. It's for a 1999 model, but 1999-2001 are virtually the same (I own a 2001 G/T model).


3

Without a wind tunnel the only way to tell is by monitoring the temperature gauge. Air flow/cooling capacity can get complex as there are many variables. Thing to consider are engine size, radiator capacity/effiency, fan size and direction of airflow all of which are influenced by each other and air flow over and around the vehicle at different speeds. If ...


3

My first suggestion would be to give the system a good flush, as that can cure no end of maladies. Drain the system fully (check your Haymes Manual for any obscure drain points), then use a hose to flush it through backwards (i.e. the opposite direction to the normal flow) until the water comes out clear. It is usually easier to do rad and engine seperately. ...


3

This actually ended up being a very simple problem. Something so simple that I'm almost in disbelief. My car has been running nearly straight antifreeze.(I'd say about 90% anyway) Everyone I'd talked to locally has said it should run even cooler doing that... but they're wrong. I emptied my expansion tank(not the radiator itself) and filled it with ...


3

I think you're fine but you need to get your leak fixed. Based on the comments on the original question: Oh! I've been checking the overflow tank! :P I remember that being empty once. I'll have to check the radiator the next time the light goes on. To answer your question when I would fill it up it was never more than one $10 container from the ...


3

some of the hoses do look like they're in bad condition ... coolant is "clean" (no oil/sludge/etc.) but does seem to have a small amount of shiny metallic particles in it, suggesting maybe a stop-leak product was used by the previous owner I think you've already called it: this sounds like a partially (or totally) clogged return from the overflow ...


3

I figure I'll post my own answer to the question today since it's the end of my 60 day window to request a refund. After all the things I tried, considering the Blue Devil attempt a failure, and starting the process to request a refund, I finally had success; the seal has held for over a month now. What it took in the end was driving 4 hours at 70 mph on a ...


3

The heater core is part of continuous loop of engine coolant propelled via the water pump, flowing through caverns in the engine, through pipes that run through the firewall into the heater core, back out the firewall, and finally through the radiator. If the thermostat dictates it (due to a temperature limit being reached), the fan blows air over the ...


2

The thermostat controls the temperature in the engine. It opens at a set temp, 195 degrees for example and allows coolant to flow through the radiator. If it's stuck open it would allow coolant to circulate through the radiator all the time not allowing the car to heat up properly. The complaint usually is the heater isn’t warm enough. If the thermostat ...


2

You shouldn't be losing fluid - did it all boil off? If you are ending up with low coolant, I would suspect a leak. If the level is okay, I would suspect either a restriction in a pipe or the radiator itself, or possibly a damaged thermostat restricting the flow. Check for a bent or twisted radiator hose or damage to the radiator. If nothing is obvious, ...


2

You see, the problem with runnning with straight coolant--a don't know how that fad got started in the previous century--is that coolant has relatively little heat capacity; whereas water has very much (near tops) heat capacity--for which reason, the main coolant during summer driving is water, not antifreeze. The main purpose of commercial ...


2

This window will almost certainly reduce the effectiveness of the radiator somewhat. The real question is whether that ends up being significant for your application. Others have suggested monitoring the temperature gauge--if the temp rises above the normal range, you've created a real problem. However, just because the gauge doesn't rise above normal ...


2

If there is a major leak 30 miles may be too far, and you may cause major (very expensive) damage to your cylinder head or engine block. Please read this question on driving without coolant! for some good advice (which broadly speaking boils down to don't do it!)


2

If you think there is a leak and have 30 miles drive, then you can reserve some pure water with ride and use it. pure water is not alternative for radiator coolant, because water will be boil quicker than coolant. but its far better than running empty coolant. One more thing if you are living in cold area do not keep water inside radiator long ,It will ...


2

I'm speculating that the under-filled condition resulted in the water pump being unable to move coolant through the radiator (maybe the water pump itself wasn't getting coolant, maybe the level was so low that it couldn't complete the circuit through the radiator and back). Why you blew a hose is a bit of a mystery...if you were making too much pressure, ...



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