Hot answers tagged

23

If the thermostat is operating properly the radiator will only come into play when the thermostat opens, when the engine is at normal operating temperature (around 190 degrees, give or take). Adding a gigantic radiator won't make a bit of difference because if the engine gets too cold, the thermostat will close, causing the engine to heat up again. In the ...


23

"Is it safe to continue driving with low coolant as long as I continue to watch the temperature gauge? " No, the temp sensor reads coolant temperature, if the coolant gets low enough to be below the temp sensor, now the sensor is reading metal temperature of the area it is screwed into (usually cylinder head), by the time it reads too hot on the gauge the ...


17

I would like to drive the car to the nearest qualified service, but there is a fair distance to it (about 8km) as I'm living in a remote location. Is it safe to drive it that distance if I refill the entire coolant tank? I would say yes, you can drive the car. Load the car with much more water than you think necessary: I find that two liter soda ...


12

Number one answer is always Head Gasket. The reason is that there are oil and water passages in close proximity, being separated by a gasket (which might just be flimsy paper or rubber, but is often steel or copper) sandwiched between two pieces of metal with (usually) different thermal expansion rates. This means that any time your engine gets far enough ...


11

I believe (and this is a gut check) you can chalk this up to deteriorated hoses which all have gone bad in the same period of time (coincidence). Each has probably served a long fruitful life and now it's time for replacement. Especially considering where you live and overheating as well, this does not seem unreasonable to me. I'd suggest if you have any ...


11

If you do not have any leaks, then your coolant is most likely getting burned and/or going into your oil. My guess is going to be a problem with your head gasket or some crack or warping in the head. I believe coolant in oil used to turn oil more brown and make it more foamy or milky. These days, the detergents and dispersants in modern oil can reduce ...


10

It sounds like the engine thermostat has failed in an open state. The thermostat regulates the flow of coolant between the radiator and the engine. When the engine needs more heat, it closes and cuts-off flow through the radiator. When the engine needs less heat, it opens and allows flow to the radiator. With the thermostat stuck open, the flow through ...


10

Remember that the reliability of any system of components will only be as strong as the weakest link. Coolant lines are pressurized under regular operation and the walls of the hoses will weaken with many, many heat cycles. It is expected that a coolant leak will spring at the weakest point of the system. The moment you replace this hose, the weakest point ...


10

Yes what you presume is correct. Depending on total volume of coolant (different for each vehicle) how much pure AF I put in, anywhere from 1/2 to 1 gallon, then top off with 50/50 mix. It is better to be over the 50% mix than under, you can go as high as 70%, so don't worry about putting a little too much pure AF after flushing the cooling system with ...


9

First, you do need to find out where the coolant is going. There is UV dye that can help with this, and if your car is smoking, that could be a sign that the coolant is leaking into the engine rather than on the ground. For the main question, "Is it safe", as long as you keep an eye on the temperature and it's not getting too high, you should be OK in the ...


8

First, if it runs hotter during slower speeds (the 25mph-50mph you mention), I would think this is a sign that you're not getting enough airflow through the radiator. This might be a fan issues, but it might also be some other obstruction that prevents sufficient airflow. You said you hit a deer and had the radiator replaced as a result. I would check or ...


8

Failure Modes Mechanical thermostats fail in one of two ways: Stuck-closed The pintle/spring doesn't retract to permit flow at the set-point temperature that is usually stamped on the thermostat itself. which can lead to the engine running at hotter than expected. If hot enough, this can lead to serious issues such as a compromised head gasket or warped ...


8

You may have developed an air bubble in the system, probably from the reservoir falling off, or from the mechanics not bleeding the cooling system after emptying it. There'll be a pocket of air in the system that's making the car overheat. Does the car lose power when it's overheating?


8

The coolant capacity of the 2004 TOYOTA COROLLA 1.8L 4-cyl Engine Code [R] 1ZZ-FE is 6.9 quarts. To accurately ensure you have a 50/50 mix in your system after a flush (assuming you actually flush it until you have clear liquid draining out), is to add 1/2 of the coolant as straight coolant (not 50/50 mix), then fill the rest as distilled water. For ...


7

First thing I'd try to figure out is how quickly it leaks - run it, stick your head underneath it as check if there is any visible leaking. If there is, chances are that it's not going to make it for 30 miles. I'd also check for any evidence of oil and water mixing. If there is, don't drive it. If it's not leaking that badly I'd be tempted to top it up with ...


7

I agree with Timo - if it is a big enough leak that you can see it clearly, then getting the car transported is much safer. In general, using water as coolant is OK for a short time or as a "get you home" alternative, but it does not have the anti-freeze and corrosion inhibiting properties of a proper coolant mix, so should not be left in the engine for ...


7

I'm assuming that this person was advocating putting a small amount of dish soap in the water used to do a coolant system flush. I would not do this to my car as routine/preventative maintenance, I would simply use water for a flush. My concern would be that any dish soap residue remaining in the system may adversely affect the chemistry of the coolant, ...


7

The heater core is part of continuous loop of engine coolant propelled via the water pump, flowing through caverns in the engine, through pipes that run through the firewall into the heater core, back out the firewall, and finally through the radiator. If the thermostat dictates it (due to a temperature limit being reached), the fan blows air over the ...


7

This particular bottle is knows as a degas bottle. The reason it has a strange shape is two fold. First, the bottle needs to fit somewhere and the shape helps that. Second and more important is that these degas bottles hold pressure. The shape reinforces the bottle so that it does not explode. In cooling systems with degas bottles the coolant does not ...


7

Its not good to run with low coolant, even worse to run with no coolant. Actually it can be quite disastrous (possibilities include blown head gaskets, seized pistons and a number of expensive repairs), but many times this is a result of a leaky radiator cap which is easy (and cheap) to replace. Someone already mentioned the dyes for detecting leaks, but ...


6

First thing is to initially determine if you're burning it or leaking it. Assuming your car isn't spewing a plume of white smoke when you're driving - you will have to do some additional diagnosis to determine the method of consumption. First check the oil and coolant - if either contain a milky substance you have a cracked something or a blown HG. ...


6

The thinner radiator might make it easier for the cold air to flow through the engine compartment. (The radiator itself wont cool an already cool engine at all if the thermostat is intact.) In cold environments it is often necessary to use a grille cover to limit cold air flow to the engine. Grille covers are especially necessary with small diesel engines ...


6

Without water and without antifreeze or just without antifreeze? I'll assume that you mean without either, but you should clarify the difference in the future. This is really simple though. The engine will overheat, quickly, and the seals and gaskets will give out, letting fluids leak in and out of places they should or shouldn't be. Eventually, parts of ...


6

The cooling system is sealed and pressurized, so under ideal conditions, nothing goes in or out. "Drying" is simply evaporation followed by the carrying away of the evaporated water by air. In reality, there is a slight opportunity for evaporation out of the overflow tank, which is not sealed/pressurized on many vehicles, but as the coolant in there is much ...


6

Simple And Technical Definition Of Coolant From a technician's standpoint "engine coolant" would be referring to the 50/50 mix of ethylene/polypropylene glycol and water. From an engineers standpoint engine coolant would TECHNICALLY be anything that assists the system in the cooling process. So, in this case you could refer to the fans, oil, and Anti-freeze ...


6

Is there as much to gain as what has been achieved with electric fans? Remember you aren't gaining anything. Just like a belt run fan, each is a parasitic loss of power. When you put an electric water pump on the engine, you are regaining some of the lost power which you didn't have access to in the first place. This will allow for better fuel mileage, etc....


6

tl dr; Not directly, but yes. The purpose of a recovery or overflow tank is to allow for expansion of the coolant, then to recover it back into the radiator as things cool off. If the tank is not there (or it all leaks out), the radiator is pushing it out onto the ground without the ability to recover any of it. When things cool off, it sucks air back into ...


6

If you can't see any obvious signs of leaks, or steam coming from anywhere if you run the engine, a likely cause is a cracked cylinder head gasket, which is letting the coolant into the cylinders and out of the tail pipe as steam. That could soon cause a lot more damage than the hassle carrying a water container in the car to top up the radiator. Personal ...


5

Your coolant shouldn't be boiling at 100C/212F if you have a proper mixture of water and anti-freeze (typically 50/50 ratio is recommended). Water's boiling point is 100C/212F. Even though it is called anti-freeze, it also raises the boiling of the water. You can buy a coolant mixture tester for a few dollars at a local auto parts store, you suck some of ...


5

This actually ended up being a very simple problem. Something so simple that I'm almost in disbelief. My car has been running nearly straight antifreeze.(I'd say about 90% anyway) Everyone I'd talked to locally has said it should run even cooler doing that... but they're wrong. I emptied my expansion tank(not the radiator itself) and filled it with ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible