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7

If you can see and access the crack, a two-part epoxy or something like JB-Weld can be great for a temporary fix. This page shows the process on a metal radiator for a race car, but your fix would be similar. Clean the site of the repair, and rough up the surface with fine sand paper, especially if working on plastic. Mix the two-part epoxy and generously ...


7

I do not understand why the coolant system needs a bleed screw at all Because air pockets. Filling up coolant doesn't necessitate that the entire system will be filled with coolant. There are parts of your cooling system that will trap air when it is refilled. The bleed screw is a means to expel the trapped air from the system. I repeatedly fill ...


7

This particular bottle is knows as a degas bottle. The reason it has a strange shape is two fold. First, the bottle needs to fit somewhere and the shape helps that. Second and more important is that these degas bottles hold pressure. The shape reinforces the bottle so that it does not explode. In cooling systems with degas bottles the coolant does not ...


6

Do not pour it down the drain, and do not pour it outside. Coolant is very sweet tasting to animals and they will "drink" it. It will affect both their kidneys and GI tract with potentially fatal consequences if not treated. Typical symptoms include vomiting, thirst, lack of appetite and unusual lethargy. If you pour it down the drain, it will pollute ...


6

Putty/epoxy works but here's a handy tip I picked up from my materials professor to ensure that the crack doesn't propagate: Drill small holes at the ends of the crack to arrest its growth before using metal putty/epoxy to seal the existing crack. My dad used to own a Maxima that developed a crack in the radiator's aluminum head. The mechanic he took ...


5

It would make no difference if you are standing still or driving the vehicle. You want to ensure you have the heater wide open when you do it to ensure you are getting the old fluid from the heater core as well as the engine. Driving the vehicle around will probably allow the process to happen a little faster, as you engine will get up to operating ...


5

In answer to the question of how to test your coolant mix, you would use an antifreeze and coolant tester In answer to why, you would want to ensure that your coolant mixture is correct as this provides protection against icing in the winter, enhances the effectiveness of the system in the summer and provides some corrosion inhibitors to prevent your ...


5

It's certainly not recommended, but I don't think it will ruin it, as long as you don't leave it in for too long... Flush the coolant system thoroughly to get rid of all traces of contaminants, and refill with proper coolant - it might be worth then doing another flush a few days later if you're worried.


5

There are only four places (in general) coolant can go missing: Out an external leak and onto the ground Out through the tail pipe getting burnt (turned into steam) because of an internal leak Into the oil through an internal leak A very small amount may evaporate from the system if it's not a closed system (ie: no overflow reservoir) ... this really isn't ...


5

If the thermostat is stuck open, you would get the symptoms you describe. A thermostat stuck closed will cause overheating.


5

The difference you observe is quite notable, so I wondered how reliable it is to just measure the density (which is what your hydrometer does). From the datasheet of your Ford antifreeze, the density is 1.10kg/l, while pure ethylen glycol has 1.10kg/l. Glysantin is another brand for antifreeze and states 1.122-1.125kg/l for its G48 (sorry, german) This ...


4

This is your Heater Control Valve But I am going to explain what it does. First of all the "wire" you see is actually a vacuum line, it's a hollow (hopefully) air-tight tube that passes vacuum to the Heater Control Valve. The heater control valve is a vacuum actuated valve that in the open position allows fluid to pass through and in the closed position ...


4

Your car overheated and the coolant leaked out of the overflow bottle. It happened a couple of times with my Opel Astra Coupe and my Subaru Forester too. If you're really lucky, nothing major is wrong with your car, but I'd advise a compression test just to be safe. The danger here is that BECAUSE the car overheated and all the coolant was lost, you may have ...


4

Check your location's laws, but the EPA says it's not hazardous waste. If you're just a DIY-er, you can probably pour it down your toilet. Try and find a recycler first though. In St. Louis, MO (my example), I have not found a better way for a DIY-er to dispose of it, but I believe professional shops have some way to dispose of it not accessible to us. ...


4

The first thing to look at is, did you actually mix like amounts to come to a true 50/50 solution? As with any scientific study, you need to make sure your results are repeatable. You bought two other antifreeze testers (hydrometers) to ensure your measuring device was good, but what you didn't do is try to make the mixture again (at least you didn't say you ...


4

Certainly sounds like the heater core is leaking coolant into the car's interior. Like Ducatikiller said it should smell a little bit sweet, but if you still can't tell stick your finger in the fluid and give it a rub-test. You will be able to tell water from engine coolant by how it feels. Also have a good look at the floorboards and the firewall in the ...


4

The thermostat would have been my first guess too. It doesn't need a sealing ring, the housing will slightly clamp it when you put it back together. It is entirely possible that the temperature sensor has 'drifted' and is reading lower than the genuine temperature. I have experienced this more than once in my own cars. It's worth as try as they're usually ...


4

Simple And Technical Definition Of Coolant From a technician's standpoint "engine coolant" would be referring to the 50/50 mix of ethylene/polypropylene glycol and water. From an engineers standpoint engine coolant would TECHNICALLY be anything that assists the system in the cooling process. So, in this case you could refer to the fans, oil, and Anti-freeze ...


4

I can see a few reasons to do this: The weather in some places will be so cold that even with the thermostat fully closed the cooling system isn't able to warm the engine up to operating temperatures. Inhibiting air flow through the radiator will reduce the amount of heat rejected to the surroundings, allowing the engine to get up to temperature. The cold ...


3

Testing Coolant is pretty easy using specific gravity. A tester has several balls that have slightly different densities. Different balls will float depending on the concentration. You want to test your concentration to be sure it wont freeze or over heat. The Antifreeze does not transfer heat very well. That is why we mix. The water does most of the ...


3

What you're referring to as a "coolant tank" is your radiator overflow tank. While it does have to have some coolant in it, putting coolant/water in it doesn't do anything to cool your engine really. You need to twist the radiator cap off (make sure you wait for it to cool off) and pour coolant or maybe for the time being while testing, just tap water. ...


3

As explained on this page, using pure antifreeze alone will not do the job: No matter which type or color your antifreeze is, it will transfer heat away most efficiently when blended with the proper amount of water - a mixture percentage based on the lowest temperatures typically seen in your climate. Most regions are best suited to a 50/50 ...


3

You have at least two options to find the leak. You can buy or rent a coolant system pressure tester. It is a small air pump that pressurizes the system to force coolant out of any weak (leak) points. The advantage to this method over just letting the engine idle is because the engine is cool you can reach your hand around the system without getting burnt. ...


3

There is nothing inherently wrong with what the service manager told you. (As an aside, service managers and mechanics are looking for add-on work. They get paid more money for this work than work you bring to them to do. If he says it's not a problem, believe them, because if they could make some money off of you, they'll do it.) If it serves your peace of ...


3

Yes, it's normal. Maybe just a tiny bit on the cool side. But if you're in traffic a lot that cooler thermostat is a good thing. All the cars I've owned would run between 85 and 95 degrees Celsius. 85 at highway speeds, then creeping up to 95 or 96 when in slow traffic, at which point the fans kick in. Pro tip: the hotter an engine runs, the more ...


3

In terms of possible root causes for failure, the following scenarios are likely culprits for a cooling system to run too cool: A temperature sensor that's reporting lower-than-actual temperatures due to issues like drift/fouling/calibration. A sticking thermostat that is flowing more coolant than necessary to maintain 176 °F. Really cold ambient air ...


3

I agree with Gary's assessment about the Manifold gaskets. The Olds 3800 is a "workhorse" engine as is the 3.3, only you don't see much of the 3.3's on the shelf or in the shop. As this is an older piece of iron it stands to reason that the gaskets may need replacing. If you have a tuned ear you can hear a leak or at least hear the approximate location of ...


3

You seem to have several concerns here, so let me try to address them one at a time. You are worried about the car starting up properly. Since the engine would not turn over when you tried to start it, then it started right away with a jump start, it sounds like it was only the battery you need to worry about. Either you left a light on or something else ...


3

Is the above a tenable explanation? No. While some thermal expansion happens in a cooling system, the amount which happens can be absorbed by the rubber hoses present in the system, unless the system overheats. When overheating occurs, steam is created, which causes pressure spikes, which causes more over heating, which causes more steam, etc. When a ...


3

If it is one of the veins that is cracked, in an emergency it is sometimes possible to cut the vein and then fold both ends over a few times to seal them. A pair of long nose pliers is usually all you need to do this.



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