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6

Engine safety. If you lose an accessory belt driven water pump, you're likely to keep driving, thinking the "oh, I just don't have an alternator" while you're busy cooking your engine beyond repair (normally with no temperature notification/change, if anything it'll read cold). When the water pump is on with the timing belt (or geared to crankshaft as is ...


5

This is the heater valve. It's Motocraft part# YG350:


5

I think the main reason for this is convenience. It's an easy place to run the water pump. If you ran it out to a fan belt, it would be in the way of the timing belt while doing it, or it would be a really awkward mess trying to work around it. The second reason is for compactness. With the water pump stuck out of the way, it physically makes the engine ...


5

It's certainly not recommended, but I don't think it will ruin it, as long as you don't leave it in for too long... Flush the coolant system thoroughly to get rid of all traces of contaminants, and refill with proper coolant - it might be worth then doing another flush a few days later if you're worried.


4

The coolant should not expire any time soon. If it is not in an automobile being used, it is not degrading. With the cap on it, there is nothing contaminating it. From what I was just reading, there is no practical expiration if kept in the original container.


4

This is your Heater Control Valve But I am going to explain what it does. First of all the "wire" you see is actually a vacuum line, it's a hollow (hopefully) air-tight tube that passes vacuum to the Heater Control Valve. The heater control valve is a vacuum actuated valve that in the open position allows fluid to pass through and in the closed position ...


3

Check your coolant level and keep an eye on your temperature gauge. A car will run fine with an overheating engine right up to the point when the engine seizes.


3

There is no way to put sealant around the outside of the housing to get it to stop leaking. You could possibly put a sealant within the coolant system, such as Bar's Radiator Stop Leak, which may or may not solve your leak issue temporarily (may solve it permanently, but I never trust it). Your better bet is to just replace the gasket. This is a ...


3

You need to drain the oil (let it drain as completely as possible) and put new oil inane run the engine. If you see it come back as a "chocolate milk" looking mixture, you need to change the oil again. This may take several tries (two or three) to get it all out. You need to change the filter with each attempt as well. The reason this is important is because ...


3

In terms of possible root causes for failure, the following scenarios are likely culprits for a cooling system to run too cool: A temperature sensor that's reporting lower-than-actual temperatures due to issues like drift/fouling/calibration. A sticking thermostat that is flowing more coolant than necessary to maintain 176 °F. Really cold ambient air ...


3

Yes, it's normal. Maybe just a tiny bit on the cool side. But if you're in traffic a lot that cooler thermostat is a good thing. All the cars I've owned would run between 85 and 95 degrees Celsius. 85 at highway speeds, then creeping up to 95 or 96 when in slow traffic, at which point the fans kick in. Pro tip: the hotter an engine runs, the more ...


3

There is nothing inherently wrong with what the service manager told you. (As an aside, service managers and mechanics are looking for add-on work. They get paid more money for this work than work you bring to them to do. If he says it's not a problem, believe them, because if they could make some money off of you, they'll do it.) If it serves your peace of ...


3

You have at least two options to find the leak. You can buy or rent a coolant system pressure tester. It is a small air pump that pressurizes the system to force coolant out of any weak (leak) points. The advantage to this method over just letting the engine idle is because the engine is cool you can reach your hand around the system without getting burnt. ...


2

It's most likely a headgasket. When they fail in a certain way, they allow exhaust gases to get into the coolant circuit instead of escaping out the exhaust valves like the Lord intended. Only way to be sure is to have a compression test done by a workshop. If you're lucky, they'll do it for free, otherwise it's not an expensive or long procedure. They just ...


2

The Polo has a plastic impeller on its water pump spindle which can and does break off causing a loss of water flow and overheating. The thermostat has a pin location locating it in housing. These too can break. The fan coming on -as soon as you start up- means the coolant sensor on the engine and the one on the bottom of the radiator are, one or both, are ...


2

There are several things to look for here: Localize where the fluid is actually coming from. Doing this will allow you to take the next step. Ensure you put all of the hoses back in place correctly. It is easy to get one cocked in the wrong direction, where you think you go it right, but you don't. Check all of them to make sure they are completely in ...


2

Dobey has already told you why you shouldn't use an intercooler as a CC radiator. But let me add something more: a charge cooler does the same job as an intercooler. So instead of using a charge cooler fed by an intercooler, why not just use the intercooler to cool your air? It's what it was designed to do. If you're really worried about the air temperature, ...


2

No, you cannot use an air/air intercooler as a air/water heat exchanger. It's not necessarily that you will see any particular corrosion from filling an aluminum air/air intercooler with 50/50 antifreeze/distilled water mix, but that it will just be horribly inefficient. An air/air versus air/water system have different designs and materials. The diameters ...


2

This is normal behavior for some vehicles. They utilize the fan to further cool the system after engine shut down (even though it does not further circulate the coolant). This is something I would not be worried about.


2

Depending on what type of vehicle and the coolant overflow reservoir type (pressurized/non-pressurized), the easiest way to accomplish this is to take the small hose the fluid travels to the overflow through off at the radiator and suspend it down below the level of the reservoir. Gravity will do the rest. Of course you need to drain it into the appropriate ...


2

If you look at the top of the tank, you'll see a screw that holds the tank to the car frame. You can't miss it. This is the only screw that holds the tank. So: Find an appropriate container for the fluid you are going to remove. Unscrew the tank cap and take the tube out. Unscrew the screw that holds the tank. Take the tank out and dump the fluid into the ...


2

You can do a carbon momoxide test on the coolant system to see if you have an internal leak from your engines cylinders. Search on YouTube for 'How to test head gasket failure using an antifreeze HC Tester'.


2

Historically the water pump was at the front of the engine in close proximity to the vehicle radiator, when vehicles were mostly rear wheel drive. There is no real advantage with todays vehicles but they continue to be at the front of the engine. Using the timing belt to drive the water pump lends itself to compactness at the front end of the engine. Some ...


2

Should you be concerned about this happening again? Yes. You haven't diagnosed or fixed the problem, so the chances of it going away with no further effort from you are very slim. Because the car does not overheat while driving, the thermostat is probably working just fine. The two scenarios which indicate a failed thermostat are Overheating very shortly ...


2

Electrolysis happens over time, and will not cause any damage over an 80 mile trip. People (wrongly) have used straight water in their radiator over the summer months thinking that's all they need and don't have issues until many years down the road. If you didn't worry about it and never changed it again, it would be an issue. Changing it out after an 80 ...


1

The check engine lights need to be read and cleared if you haven't done it already. This can only be done with an OBD-II scanner. If you don't have one, take it to an Autozone or the like. They can do it for you and will usually do so for free.


1

Coolant coming out of the overflow is a sign of over-pressurisation. The cheapest cause of this is the pressure cap failing - have you replaced that? The other main causes of it are overheating, or gas getting into the system and so increasing the pressure, usually through a head gasket breach between a cylinder and the water jacket. Have you noticed any ...


1

You have to be sure what the substance is, in your coolant. How are you determining that it is oil and not transmission fluid? They often get confused by people. A good way to be sure is to check the levels of the transmission fluid and oil, depending on the leakage, usually the low level one is leaking. If you are absolutely sure it is indeed engine oil, ...


1

It's not unusual for a second radiator to be present behind the main radiator, often to cool the transmission fluid. If these fluids are mixing (water and transmission fluid), then both radiators have been damaged and are leaking their fluids together. Both radiators will need to be removed and repaired. Sometimes coolant will appear in engine oil because ...


1

I take it from the wording, English is not your first language. To answer you outright, there is no reason to mix coolant and oil, under no situation where a vehicle is concerned. If you are actually asking why oil would be fed through something containing coolant (radiator or such), the reason would be simple in that it is cooling the oil. By cooling the ...



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