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6

The probable answer here is NO. Engines have freeze plugs in them which, when the block and coolant freezes, will pop out. This is a relief point so as not to damage the block (does not completely rule out block damage). When this happens and the coolant thaws, it will flow out of the block. This is the reason the temp went up and the check engine light came ...


4

If you want to know for sure, you can ask the dealer what they use. It would be good to know for the future anyway. There are two main types of anti freeze, generally they all use ethylene glycol as the coolant base; though they differ in the type of corrosion inhibitors used. "Traditional" coolants (often green or yellow) generally use silicates, while ...


4

Either the owner's manual or a repair manual will give you this information. I happen to have an owner's manual for a '98 Forester, and the value given there is 6.2ℓ, or 6.6 U.S. quarts. The factory service manual for a 2000 Forester gives 6.0ℓ, or 6.3 U.S. quarts. It's possible that the owner's manual value includes the coolant in the reservoir (that's the ...


4

Adding antifreeze to water in your radiator will not make it run hot, unless you are have a very high portion of antifreeze to water. Antifreeze/coolant raises the boiling point of water to keep it from boiling out and lowers the freezing point to keep it from freezing up. If it is full of water now and there is no room for antifreeze. Then drain the ...


4

I think the likely suspect here is engine oil. If your head gasket is blown it is not unusual for oil to get into the coolant or the other way around. Coolant is being circulated through the engine very close to where oil is being circulated through the engine. Consider doing a compression test and/or a leak down test.


3

Your radiator cap may be bad. If it's not holding pressure, you're going to have some overflow. If that isn't it, the next thing to look at is for a head gasket leak (or possibly a cracked head). Remember, you can have a head gasket leak without oil in the water or visa-versa. You can get a kit from AutoZone or the like to test for exhaust gasses in the ...


3

Flush the radiator. Some of the red coolants, especially if they used dexcool will look like that normally. If you've got oil, or transmission fluid going into the coolant you will likely have coolant going into the oil or transmission fluid, so check those fluids closely for contamination. Once you've done that, monitor the coolant closely and see if the ...


2

If jump starting works, it has nothing to do with the coolant. Though coolant doesn't usually just go missing; it's (supposed to be) a closed system. That's worth addressing, too. Quick DIY test to see if the problem is the battery or the alternator: -Go to the hardware store (or ideally the nearest harbor freight tools) and buy a $10 volt meter. Digital ...


2

Coolant has nothing to do with your car's ability to start. Most cars can be started with the water pump not even running (not for long, mind you, as it will overheat). You said you needed a jump to start once -- I'd imagine your battery needs replacing.


2

Oil in the coolant or vice versa is usually a sign of a failed head gasket and/or a cracked/warped head. Other symptoms include white exhaust (when not caused by low temperatures, obviously), exhaust gas in the coolant (causing bubbling in the coolant or "burping" of coolant into the expansion tank), and a high/fluctuating temperature gauge. The usual ...


2

The Honda coolant is 50/50 prediluted, non-silicate/non-borate, type 2 ethylene glycol based coolant (I know this because I just snagged a bottle out of my basement and copied that off the back label, shown below).


2

The white emulsion on the inside of the oil filler cap is caused by 'under bonnet thermals'. If the PCV is under performing then the fumes and humidity from the engine crank case are cooled and solidified by cold air entering the engine compartment. The cold air cools the cam cover/rocker cover and causes the emulsion on its inside. Significant amounts of ...


2

If you had overheating problems before adding the antifreeze/topping up the coolant, then you could be looking at a thermostat problem. Check also for any damage to hoses, radiator and the expansion tank cap. In passing, water boils at 100C/212F. A motor vehicle cooling system is maintained by the system at pressure, the pressure prevents the coolant from ...


2

You likely have trapped air in your coolant/antifreeze system. But before I tell you how to fix it, please know that you should NOT mix different colours of anti-freeze. They may react and form a thick sludge that can block the system. And that gets difficult or expensive to take care of. Now, to get rid of the trapped air, all you need to do is Unscrew ...


2

I would think you should be able to if there is a terminal for the wire to attach to. If the terminal has broke off at the base of the sensor, then it probably won't work. I would use a soldering iron, versus open flame type of iron to ensure the heat is more localized. If you are worried about the sensor not working due to the heat, I don't think I would ...


2

No, it's not normal. If it happens over the course of a couple of months, it probably means that there is a very tiny leak somewhere and when the coolant gets hot enough, some of it escapes as steam. Check your cap's tightness first. Or if you're unlucky and your car recently overheated, it may have caused your head gasket to blow in such a way that ...


1

You need to drain the oil (let it drain as completely as possible) and put new oil in. If you see it come back as a "chocolate milk" looking mixture, you need to change the oil again. This may take several tries (two or three) to get it all out. You need to change the filter with each attempt as well. The reason this is important is because the water in the ...


1

No one's mentioned the simplest thing yet. If the system is overfilled, it will overflow. As it heats up, the coolant expands and that is why you don't fill up the overflow bottle all of the way. (If you are pouring fluid directly into the radiator, you do fill it up completely.)


1

If you have blown a head gasket(depending on severity)water spitting out of your exhaust is an obvious sign).A very affordable pressure test is advisable and may serve to save you money and time


1

You have air in your system, which is either causing pump cavitation or hot spots. I took a look around on the internet to see what other sites are saying for bleeding the system (which is what you need to do). I could not find any that suggested there are bleeder screws to clear out the gas pockets, so the next best thing is to have you park the truck ...


1

As both 'mikes' and 'Paulster2' thought, the radiator system was simply burping. It took much more coolant than I expected, ~2 refills to the middle of the coolant tank. Might have been some combination of the rapidly cooling weather coupled with the water pump replacement, but at any rate, coolant level is perfect now without any intervention other than ...


1

The first thing to do is repair any cooling system leak that you have. (Only on a cold engine). The filler cap is on an expansion tank, which is on the right hand side of the radiator as you look at it from the front of the car. You add a mixture of antifreeze and water, at a 50-50 mix, into the tank until the float in the tank rises to the top. Replace the ...


1

The cooling system uses pressure to further raise the boiling point of the coolant. Just as the boiling temperature of water is higher in a pressure cooker, the boiling temperature of coolant is higher if you pressurize the system. Most cars have a pressure limit of 14 to 15 pounds per square inch (psi), which raises the boiling point another 45 F (25 C) so ...


1

Something which might help you diagnose the issue better is to do an old school trick on your just replaced distributor cap. This would be to generously spray the inside of the cap and the rotor with WD-40. Many people use this as a lubricant to help with stuck nuts and such. The WD in the name actually means Water Displacement. By spraying this inside, it ...


1

Typical engine coolant not only contains antifreeze but also corrosion inhibitors that deteriorate with age. It will always be better to know that something is OK rather than quess it is. We still check our engine oil level even though cars today use very little oil-don't we!


1

I had something similar happen to me after I changed the thermostat and flushed out the cooling system. There was air trapped somewhere in the system and wouldn't show up until I had been driving for around 20 to 40 minutes. The random nature of the issue threw me until I found out for my van: 1996 Ford Windstar, you have to take the cap off the coolant ...


1

If it is only overheating while idling or in heavy traffic I have a few suggestions. Is the fan shroud still in place it is vital for moving air at low speed. With the radiator cap removed allow it to come to operating temperature. Looking into the radiator you should see the coolant flowing through the radiator. If the coolant is not moving check the ...


1

First off, this is not good for your engine at all, it will create other damage if not taken care of. It sounds like the thermostat is getting stuck closed and then opening again later. I would first replace the thermostat and see if it happens again.



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