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6

The probable answer here is NO. Engines have freeze plugs in them which, when the block and coolant freezes, will pop out. This is a relief point so as not to damage the block (does not completely rule out block damage). When this happens and the coolant thaws, it will flow out of the block. This is the reason the temp went up and the check engine light came ...


5

Engine safety. If you lose an accessory belt driven water pump, you're likely to keep driving, thinking the "oh, I just don't have an alternator" while you're busy cooking your engine beyond repair (normally with no temperature notification/change, if anything it'll read cold). When the water pump is on with the timing belt (or geared to crankshaft as is ...


5

I think the main reason for this is convenience. It's an easy place to run the water pump. If you ran it out to a fan belt, it would be in the way of the timing belt while doing it, or it would be a really awkward mess trying to work around it. The second reason is for compactness. With the water pump stuck out of the way, it physically makes the engine ...


4

Either the owner's manual or a repair manual will give you this information. I happen to have an owner's manual for a '98 Forester, and the value given there is 6.2ℓ, or 6.6 U.S. quarts. The factory service manual for a 2000 Forester gives 6.0ℓ, or 6.3 U.S. quarts. It's possible that the owner's manual value includes the coolant in the reservoir (that's the ...


4

Adding antifreeze to water in your radiator will not make it run hot, unless you are have a very high portion of antifreeze to water. Antifreeze/coolant raises the boiling point of water to keep it from boiling out and lowers the freezing point to keep it from freezing up. If it is full of water now and there is no room for antifreeze. Then drain the ...


4

I think the likely suspect here is engine oil. If your head gasket is blown it is not unusual for oil to get into the coolant or the other way around. Coolant is being circulated through the engine very close to where oil is being circulated through the engine. Consider doing a compression test and/or a leak down test.


4

The coolant should not expire any time soon. If it is not in an automobile being used, it is not degrading. With the cap on it, there is nothing contaminating it. From what I was just reading, there is no practical expiration if kept in the original container.


3

You need to drain the oil (let it drain as completely as possible) and put new oil inane run the engine. If you see it come back as a "chocolate milk" looking mixture, you need to change the oil again. This may take several tries (two or three) to get it all out. You need to change the filter with each attempt as well. The reason this is important is because ...


3

Your radiator cap may be bad. If it's not holding pressure, you're going to have some overflow. If that isn't it, the next thing to look at is for a head gasket leak (or possibly a cracked head). Remember, you can have a head gasket leak without oil in the water or visa-versa. You can get a kit from AutoZone or the like to test for exhaust gasses in the ...


3

Flush the radiator. Some of the red coolants, especially if they used dexcool will look like that normally. If you've got oil, or transmission fluid going into the coolant you will likely have coolant going into the oil or transmission fluid, so check those fluids closely for contamination. Once you've done that, monitor the coolant closely and see if the ...


2

If jump starting works, it has nothing to do with the coolant. Though coolant doesn't usually just go missing; it's (supposed to be) a closed system. That's worth addressing, too. Quick DIY test to see if the problem is the battery or the alternator: -Go to the hardware store (or ideally the nearest harbor freight tools) and buy a $10 volt meter. Digital ...


2

Coolant has nothing to do with your car's ability to start. Most cars can be started with the water pump not even running (not for long, mind you, as it will overheat). You said you needed a jump to start once -- I'd imagine your battery needs replacing.


2

Oil in the coolant or vice versa is usually a sign of a failed head gasket and/or a cracked/warped head. Other symptoms include white exhaust (when not caused by low temperatures, obviously), exhaust gas in the coolant (causing bubbling in the coolant or "burping" of coolant into the expansion tank), and a high/fluctuating temperature gauge. The usual ...


2

The white emulsion on the inside of the oil filler cap is caused by 'under bonnet thermals'. If the PCV is under performing then the fumes and humidity from the engine crank case are cooled and solidified by cold air entering the engine compartment. The cold air cools the cam cover/rocker cover and causes the emulsion on its inside. Significant amounts of ...


2

If you had overheating problems before adding the antifreeze/topping up the coolant, then you could be looking at a thermostat problem. Check also for any damage to hoses, radiator and the expansion tank cap. In passing, water boils at 100C/212F. A motor vehicle cooling system is maintained by the system at pressure, the pressure prevents the coolant from ...


2

You likely have trapped air in your coolant/antifreeze system. But before I tell you how to fix it, please know that you should NOT mix different colours of anti-freeze. They may react and form a thick sludge that can block the system. And that gets difficult or expensive to take care of. Now, to get rid of the trapped air, all you need to do is Unscrew ...


2

I would think you should be able to if there is a terminal for the wire to attach to. If the terminal has broke off at the base of the sensor, then it probably won't work. I would use a soldering iron, versus open flame type of iron to ensure the heat is more localized. If you are worried about the sensor not working due to the heat, I don't think I would ...


2

No, it's not normal. If it happens over the course of a couple of months, it probably means that there is a very tiny leak somewhere and when the coolant gets hot enough, some of it escapes as steam. Check your cap's tightness first. Or if you're unlucky and your car recently overheated, it may have caused your head gasket to blow in such a way that ...


2

Historically the water pump was at the front of the engine in close proximity to the vehicle radiator, when vehicles were mostly rear wheel drive. There is no real advantage with todays vehicles but they continue to be at the front of the engine. Using the timing belt to drive the water pump lends itself to compactness at the front end of the engine. Some ...


2

No, you cannot use an air/air intercooler as a air/water heat exchanger. It's not necessarily that you will see any particular corrosion from filling an aluminum air/air intercooler with 50/50 antifreeze/distilled water mix, but that it will just be horribly inefficient. An air/air versus air/water system have different designs and materials. The diameters ...


2

Dobey has already told you why you shouldn't use an intercooler as a CC radiator. But let me add something more: a charge cooler does the same job as an intercooler. So instead of using a charge cooler fed by an intercooler, why not just use the intercooler to cool your air? It's what it was designed to do. If you're really worried about the air temperature, ...


2

There are several things to look for here: Localize where the fluid is actually coming from. Doing this will allow you to take the next step. Ensure you put all of the hoses back in place correctly. It is easy to get one cocked in the wrong direction, where you think you go it right, but you don't. Check all of them to make sure they are completely in ...


1

When the word coolant is used in can mean a couple of things. Coolant made up of antifreeze and water out of your household tap, 50-50 solution, would last for around 3 years. Coolant made up of antifreeze and distilled (de-ionised) water, 50-50 solution, should last for around 5 years. Because of the nonsense surrounding 'coolants' always adhere to the ...


1

Not totally, but this is definitely going to be an expensive lesson in learning where your tires are from the driver's seat. That must've been one heck of a curb, if you banged the front of the car hard enough to damage the radiator and blow fan blades off. Actually, the fan blades more than likely tore up the radiator on their way off, but still - they're ...


1

There are quite a few parts on the front end of a Beamer that could be damaged to lose fluid. Engine radiator being the most obvious, but also the rad expansion tank, AirCon condenser rad, power steering reservoir, power steering hoses across the front subframe, even the screen wash reservoir on the right hand side, and the engines sump. Have you considered ...


1

No one's mentioned the simplest thing yet. If the system is overfilled, it will overflow. As it heats up, the coolant expands and that is why you don't fill up the overflow bottle all of the way. (If you are pouring fluid directly into the radiator, you do fill it up completely.)


1

If you have blown a head gasket(depending on severity)water spitting out of your exhaust is an obvious sign).A very affordable pressure test is advisable and may serve to save you money and time


1

You have air in your system, which is either causing pump cavitation or hot spots. I took a look around on the internet to see what other sites are saying for bleeding the system (which is what you need to do). I could not find any that suggested there are bleeder screws to clear out the gas pockets, so the next best thing is to have you park the truck ...


1

As both 'mikes' and 'Paulster2' thought, the radiator system was simply burping. It took much more coolant than I expected, ~2 refills to the middle of the coolant tank. Might have been some combination of the rapidly cooling weather coupled with the water pump replacement, but at any rate, coolant level is perfect now without any intervention other than ...


1

The first thing to do is repair any cooling system leak that you have. (Only on a cold engine). The filler cap is on an expansion tank, which is on the right hand side of the radiator as you look at it from the front of the car. You add a mixture of antifreeze and water, at a 50-50 mix, into the tank until the float in the tank rises to the top. Replace the ...



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