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6

There are silicate antifreezes, used in most domestic cars until recent years, and OAT antifreezes, used in Japanese cars because of their domestic market testing. Domestic cars today all use OAT now, with Chrysler the last to switch. See http://www.sae.org/mags/aei/mater/11284 Any OAT antifreeze will work in a Honda, but don't use silicate antifreeze in ...


6

I suspect you have a leaking head gasket, you don't have to see the coolant leak because it can leak into the combustion chamber and exit your vehicle in the form of vapor from the tail pipe. It can also leak into the oil so make sure to check the oil for contamination. It could also be as simple as a bad radiator cap, you can test them with specialized ...


6

The cooling system is sealed and pressurized, so under ideal conditions, nothing goes in or out. "Drying" is simply evaporation followed by the carrying away of the evaporated water by air. In reality, there is a slight opportunity for evaporation out of the overflow tank, which is not sealed/pressurized on many vehicles, but as the coolant in there is much ...


6

The probable answer here is NO. Engines have freeze plugs in them which, when the block and coolant freezes, will pop out. This is a relief point so as not to damage the block (does not completely rule out block damage). When this happens and the coolant thaws, it will flow out of the block. This is the reason the temp went up and the check engine light came ...


4

I think the likely suspect here is engine oil. If your head gasket is blown it is not unusual for oil to get into the coolant or the other way around. Coolant is being circulated through the engine very close to where oil is being circulated through the engine. Consider doing a compression test and/or a leak down test.


4

Adding antifreeze to water in your radiator will not make it run hot, unless you are have a very high portion of antifreeze to water. Antifreeze/coolant raises the boiling point of water to keep it from boiling out and lowers the freezing point to keep it from freezing up. If it is full of water now and there is no room for antifreeze. Then drain the ...


4

If you want to know for sure, you can ask the dealer what they use. It would be good to know for the future anyway. There are two main types of anti freeze, generally they all use ethylene glycol as the coolant base; though they differ in the type of corrosion inhibitors used. "Traditional" coolants (often green or yellow) generally use silicates, while ...


4

Either the owner's manual or a repair manual will give you this information. I happen to have an owner's manual for a '98 Forester, and the value given there is 6.2ℓ, or 6.6 U.S. quarts. The factory service manual for a 2000 Forester gives 6.0ℓ, or 6.3 U.S. quarts. It's possible that the owner's manual value includes the coolant in the reservoir (that's the ...


3

Flush the radiator. Some of the red coolants, especially if they used dexcool will look like that normally. If you've got oil, or transmission fluid going into the coolant you will likely have coolant going into the oil or transmission fluid, so check those fluids closely for contamination. Once you've done that, monitor the coolant closely and see if the ...


3

Bank 1 on your 3800 Series II Engine would be the set of cylinders that is closer to the front bumper of the vehicle (cylinders 1, 3, 5). Bank 2 (cylinders 2, 4, 6) would be against the firewall. The Leak... Any vacuum-leak hunt shouldn't start without having a clear vacuum-hose diagram in-hand. There should be one on a placard inside the engine bay ...


3

If coolant is getting into the engine, then oil will be getting into the coolant. It's a 2-way street there. I'm really surprised he didn't mention it, since it's expected. However, normally after doing a gasket repair of that type they just automatically change your coolant and oil on the spot since it's contaminated.


2

A dry radiator will cause overheating that is likely to warp cylinder heads and do even more damage. This is expensive to fix. An empty overflow tank should be topped up with a 50/50 mix occasionally until you get to a repair shop. Keep an eye on your temp gauge and stop driving if the needle is in the red! Your coolant leak prevents proper pressurization ...


2

The only special equipment you'll need to flush your own radiator is a bucket. The fact that they claimed it would take special equipment is just one red flag. I'd be skeptical they even changed the oil. Just google how to flush your Toyota's radiator, you'll see it's super easy. And see if you can warn everyone else in your area about that shop.


2

To add to R...'s answer, I don't know about your Toyota, but on my buick there's a wingnut on the radiator, once I unscrewed that all the coolant came out (so drip pan was my 'special equipment'), once it stopped I tightened the wingnut and added properly mixed coolant, been running fine ever since. If you really want a peak at what it will take, here is ...


2

Oil in the coolant reservoir is usually a pretty bad sign! Are there signs of coolant in the oil as well (a creamy mayonnaise-like substance)? Either of those are signs of Head Gasket failure, which would eventually stop the engine from starting, but would normally give a lot of other signs first... You say it started off as an intermittant problem - is it ...


2

If jump starting works, it has nothing to do with the coolant. Though coolant doesn't usually just go missing; it's (supposed to be) a closed system. That's worth addressing, too. Quick DIY test to see if the problem is the battery or the alternator: -Go to the hardware store (or ideally the nearest harbor freight tools) and buy a $10 volt meter. Digital ...


2

Oil in the coolant or vice versa is usually a sign of a failed head gasket and/or a cracked/warped head. Other symptoms include white exhaust (when not caused by low temperatures, obviously), exhaust gas in the coolant (causing bubbling in the coolant or "burping" of coolant into the expansion tank), and a high/fluctuating temperature gauge. The usual ...


2

The Honda coolant is 50/50 prediluted, non-silicate/non-borate, type 2 ethylene glycol based coolant (I know this because I just snagged a bottle out of my basement and copied that off the back label, shown below).


2

The white emulsion on the inside of the oil filler cap is caused by 'under bonnet thermals'. If the PCV is under performing then the fumes and humidity from the engine crank case are cooled and solidified by cold air entering the engine compartment. The cold air cools the cam cover/rocker cover and causes the emulsion on its inside. Significant amounts of ...


2

If you had overheating problems before adding the antifreeze/topping up the coolant, then you could be looking at a thermostat problem. Check also for any damage to hoses, radiator and the expansion tank cap. In passing, water boils at 100C/212F. A motor vehicle cooling system is maintained by the system at pressure, the pressure prevents the coolant from ...


2

You likely have trapped air in your coolant/antifreeze system. But before I tell you how to fix it, please know that you should NOT mix different colours of anti-freeze. They may react and form a thick sludge that can block the system. And that gets difficult or expensive to take care of. Now, to get rid of the trapped air, all you need to do is Unscrew ...


2

I would think you should be able to if there is a terminal for the wire to attach to. If the terminal has broke off at the base of the sensor, then it probably won't work. I would use a soldering iron, versus open flame type of iron to ensure the heat is more localized. If you are worried about the sensor not working due to the heat, I don't think I would ...


1

The first thing to do is repair any cooling system leak that you have. (Only on a cold engine). The filler cap is on an expansion tank, which is on the right hand side of the radiator as you look at it from the front of the car. You add a mixture of antifreeze and water, at a 50-50 mix, into the tank until the float in the tank rises to the top. Replace the ...


1

I had something similar happen to me after I changed the thermostat and flushed out the cooling system. There was air trapped somewhere in the system and wouldn't show up until I had been driving for around 20 to 40 minutes. The random nature of the issue threw me until I found out for my van: 1996 Ford Windstar, you have to take the cap off the coolant ...


1

If it is only overheating while idling or in heavy traffic I have a few suggestions. Is the fan shroud still in place it is vital for moving air at low speed. With the radiator cap removed allow it to come to operating temperature. Looking into the radiator you should see the coolant flowing through the radiator. If the coolant is not moving check the ...


1

The cooling system uses pressure to further raise the boiling point of the coolant. Just as the boiling temperature of water is higher in a pressure cooker, the boiling temperature of coolant is higher if you pressurize the system. Most cars have a pressure limit of 14 to 15 pounds per square inch (psi), which raises the boiling point another 45 F (25 C) so ...


1

Something which might help you diagnose the issue better is to do an old school trick on your just replaced distributor cap. This would be to generously spray the inside of the cap and the rotor with WD-40. Many people use this as a lubricant to help with stuck nuts and such. The WD in the name actually means Water Displacement. By spraying this inside, it ...


1

Thanks for the responce. I did run the steel seal with the 1 spark plugged removed for 1 hour. not only did it bring the compression back to that cyl but im not getting exhaust gasses in my coolant anymore. I recommend steel seal for any blow headgasket issues. not only do they stand behind their product IT WORKS!!!. also found the person i bought the car ...


1

This is almost surely a blown head gasket. A compression test might not even show it, especially if the leak only happens under the pressure of combustion (which is much higher than just the compression from the cylinder moving). You could get a block check kit (which works by pulling fumes from the radiator opening through pH test fluid to determine if ...


1

I've seen similar symptoms a couple times before in other cars (I have no Ford experience). In one case it was the oil pump failing (pump later suddenly seized up). In 2 other cases that come to mind it was actually an alternator going overvoltage and freaking out the ECU causing it to pop lights when it shouldn't.



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