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19

"Is it safe to continue driving with low coolant as long as I continue to watch the temperature gauge? " No, the temp sensor reads coolant temperature, if the coolant gets low enough to be below the temp sensor, now the sensor is reading metal temperature of the area it is screwed into (usually cylinder head), by the time it reads too hot on the gauge the ...


10

If you do not have any leaks, then your coolant is most likely getting burned and/or going into your oil. My guess is going to be a problem with your head gasket or some crack or warping in the head. I believe coolant in oil used to turn oil more brown and make it more foamy or milky. These days, the detergents and dispersants in modern oil can reduce ...


9

Yes what you presume is correct. Depending on total volume of coolant (different for each vehicle) how much pure AF I put in, anywhere from 1/2 to 1 gallon, then top off with 50/50 mix. It is better to be over the 50% mix than under, you can go as high as 70%, so don't worry about putting a little too much pure AF after flushing the cooling system with ...


8

The coolant capacity of the 2004 TOYOTA COROLLA 1.8L 4-cyl Engine Code [R] 1ZZ-FE is 6.9 quarts. To accurately ensure you have a 50/50 mix in your system after a flush (assuming you actually flush it until you have clear liquid draining out), is to add 1/2 of the coolant as straight coolant (not 50/50 mix), then fill the rest as distilled water. For ...


8

First, you do need to find out where the coolant is going. There is UV dye that can help with this, and if your car is smoking, that could be a sign that the coolant is leaking into the engine rather than on the ground. For the main question, "Is it safe", as long as you keep an eye on the temperature and it's not getting too high, you should be OK in the ...


6

Its not good to run with low coolant, even worse to run with no coolant. Actually it can be quite disastrous (possibilities include blown head gaskets, seized pistons and a number of expensive repairs), but many times this is a result of a leaky radiator cap which is easy (and cheap) to replace. Someone already mentioned the dyes for detecting leaks, but ...


5

You can use a coolant mixture tester to test the coolant to water ratio. Any auto parts store should carry them.


5

If you can't see any obvious signs of leaks, or steam coming from anywhere if you run the engine, a likely cause is a cracked cylinder head gasket, which is letting the coolant into the cylinders and out of the tail pipe as steam. That could soon cause a lot more damage than the hassle carrying a water container in the car to top up the radiator. Personal ...


5

There are three places I can think the water would be flowing out of from the back area of the engine. The engine in your Yukon should be the GenI Small Block Chevrolet (SBC) engine (I believe they started putting LSx motors in them in 1999). The SBC has water passages through the intake manifold at the front and back of the engine. If one of these passages ...


4

If it has an engine oil cooler, that is most likely the problem, a faulty oil cooler, some are made into the radiator, others have heater hoses running to a remote oil cooler, and a few I have seen are where the oil filter screws on, the oil cooler has a leak into the coolant side. The reason no coolant is in the oil is because it is a high pressure leak, ...


3

You can't have a leak in your cooling system, period. You need to get the car back to the mechanic if you have a coolant leak (albeit a small one). Over time you'll continue to lose coolant when the system pressurises and this is unacceptable as the car won't be reliable. Eeventually the coolant will boil and the engine overheat when enough coolant has ...


2

Clear water is not a sign of requiring a flush. It might be a sign that you need some anti-freeze... Brownish water or any other color that is not the normal color of your coolant could potentially benefit from a flush. Plain water in our engine could potentially cause problems: Water will boil over and not cool the engine sufficiently. Danger of rust if ...


2

Either the starter is bad, or the engine overheated severely and has galded the pistons causing it to resist being turned by the starter. Try a new starter, if symptoms are the same, see how hard it is to turn the engine over using a breaker bar and socket, use the front crankshaft damper bolt to turn the engine clockwise, can you turn it fairly easily? If ...


2

I'm going to post this answer as preliminary and will update when more information is available. If there is water visibly leaking from an engine, there are a few major culprits: hose connections, the water pump, and freeze plugs. Since the water is coming from a "hole in the engine", I think we can cross off water hose connections. If the water is ...


2

As a first step to helping you answer your question it will be helpful to familiarize yourself with the cooling system. I would recommend this video as a short introduction. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J48JLu_L5cY There are several components that may fail in the cooling system. Here is a list of places where leaks can typically occur. A cracked ...


1

I suspect that you've filled the system correctly but that the additional stress places on the seals which were perhaps old, perished and slightly seeping have now, with the added pressure, failed completely and that the cloud you saw was the gas escaping at speed.


1

You need to get this car to a Mechanic ASAP. Even though you keep an eye on the gauge. By the time the gauge is in the danger zone the damage has already been done. Spent the bucks now to fix it and save a bundle on the chance that thing Blows a gasket..........



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