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17

I have heard (from an auto store clerk) that running just water will cause overheating. Well, that's not true. Water isn't the cause of overheating. Your coolant mixture (of whatever proportion) and radiator work together to get rid of the heat. If it's not hot, you won't overheat. However, when it is hot, the coolant can only absorb heat up to its ...


13

Lets start with the fact that Ford doesn't make anti-freeze, they buy it in. It will have certain specs of course but so does all anti-freeze. It will also be made by one of the major producers of the product. If you can find the Ford specs you could compare it to other brands. Alternatively, contact the makers of different brands of anti-freeze and ask them ...


11

I would like to drive the car to the nearest qualified service, but there is a fair distance to it (about 8km) as I'm living in a remote location. Is it safe to drive it that distance if I refill the entire coolant tank? I would say yes, you can drive the car. Load the car with much more water than you think necessary: I find that two liter ...


11

Every manufacturer recommends their own fluids. Everybody wins because your engine gets "less corrosion" and they great great markup on those things. A while ago I did cooling system maintenance (replace hoses, water pump, thermostat, temp sensor, radiator cap) on my wife's BMW 330i. That make/model has a lot of following and several high-quality forums ...


9

If you haven't run the car yet then just drain out the reservoir. If you have run the car then some of the fluid might have started to circulate through the cooling system. If so, flush your coolant. A small amount should not affect the car's ability to stay cool. So this is not that critical, but you definitely don't want to let your engine overheat.


7

The most likely source is the head gasket. There are very few other ways (short of catastrophic engine failure - and that would give other symptoms!) of the two mixing. Check for excessive smoke (oil getting into the bores), coolant loss (coolant getting into the bores) and a mayonnaise effect in the oil (coolant getting into the oil) You don't say what ...


7

First thing I'd try to figure out is how quickly it leaks - run it, stick your head underneath it as check if there is any visible leaking. If there is, chances are that it's not going to make it for 30 miles. I'd also check for any evidence of oil and water mixing. If there is, don't drive it. If it's not leaking that badly I'd be tempted to top it up with ...


6

Normally, I would ask first in a comment but that seems to be a privilege not available to new users, so here goes: Are you sure it was the radiator cap and not the overflow bottle? The radiator is usually full and getting 100ml in would be a struggle, not to mention that the green coolant would be staring you in the face. If you radiator wasn't full then ...


6

There are silicate antifreezes, used in most domestic cars until recent years, and OAT antifreezes, used in Japanese cars because of their domestic market testing. Domestic cars today all use OAT now, with Chrysler the last to switch. See http://www.sae.org/mags/aei/mater/11284 Any OAT antifreeze will work in a Honda, but don't use silicate antifreeze in ...


6

The main ingredient in automotive antifreeze, Ethylene glycol, has a higher boiling point when mixed with water than water alone. Wherever you live, I bet it's not Arizona or Texas. Steam voids suck, you don't want any in your cooling system. Antifreeze also contains corrosion inhibitors. I bet you don't have hard water, either.


6

The very first thing that you should check is whether you actually made a mistake and, if so, which one. A cap that says "ATF oil only" is for automatic transmission fluid. If you're adding engine oil to the transmission, that's going to make your transmission very unhappy. It is fixable: you'll need to drain the transmission fluid and replace it. If ...


6

I suspect you have a leaking head gasket, you don't have to see the coolant leak because it can leak into the combustion chamber and exit your vehicle in the form of vapor from the tail pipe. It can also leak into the oil so make sure to check the oil for contamination. It could also be as simple as a bad radiator cap, you can test them with specialized ...


6

The cooling system is sealed and pressurized, so under ideal conditions, nothing goes in or out. "Drying" is simply evaporation followed by the carrying away of the evaporated water by air. In reality, there is a slight opportunity for evaporation out of the overflow tank, which is not sealed/pressurized on many vehicles, but as the coolant in there is much ...


6

The probable answer here is NO. Engines have freeze plugs in them which, when the block and coolant freezes, will pop out. This is a relief point so as not to damage the block (does not completely rule out block damage). When this happens and the coolant thaws, it will flow out of the block. This is the reason the temp went up and the check engine light came ...


5

Your coolant shouldn't be boiling at 100C/212F if you have a proper mixture of water and anti-freeze (typically 50/50 ratio is recommended). Water's boiling point is 100C/212F. Even though it is called anti-freeze, it also raises the boiling of the water. You can buy a coolant mixture tester for a few dollars at a local auto parts store, you suck some of ...


5

Antifreeze is a blend of several different ingredients: the antifreeze/coolant active ingredient, (mostly) water, corrosion inhibitors to prevent the water from rusting away the inside of your engine, and a secret blend of herbs and spices that's particular to each manufacturer. There are several different choices for the active ingredient (ethylene ...


5

Following up on @Nick C's answer: The head gasket almost certainly needs to be replaced and, on some cars, replacing the head gasket is straightforward work with the right tools and procedures. However, on some seemingly mainstream cars, this is not the case. In order of ease of access to the head gasket, I would rate the common designs as follows: ...


5

The main thing the higher pressure cap will do is to increase the boiling point of the coolant slightly. 3psi isn't going to make a huge difference, but it will make some difference. If your cooling system is in good shape, the higher pressure unlikely to cause problems. If your cooling system is already on the way out, well, then it'll be on the way out a ...


5

I agree with Timo - if it is a big enough leak that you can see it clearly, then getting the car transported is much safer. In general, using water as coolant is OK for a short time or as a "get you home" alternative, but it does not have the anti-freeze and corrosion inhibiting properties of a proper coolant mix, so should not be left in the engine for ...


5

Without water and without antifreeze or just without antifreeze? I'll assume that you mean without either, but you should clarify the difference in the future. This is really simple though. The engine will overheat, quickly, and the seals and gaskets will give out, letting fluids leak in and out of places they should or shouldn't be. Eventually, parts of ...


5

I think the main reason for this is convenience. It's an easy place to run the water pump. If you ran it out to a fan belt, it would be in the way of the timing belt while doing it, or it would be a really awkward mess trying to work around it. The second reason is for compactness. With the water pump stuck out of the way, it physically makes the engine ...


5

Engine safety. If you lose an accessory belt driven water pump, you're likely to keep driving, thinking the "oh, I just don't have an alternator" while you're busy cooking your engine beyond repair (normally with no temperature notification/change, if anything it'll read cold). When the water pump is on with the timing belt (or geared to crankshaft as is ...


4

You need to drain the coolant and replace it. You should follow the instructions in your owners manual. If you don't have one handy, the ehow page is a fairly general set of instructions but it'll get you into the right general location for the coolant drain. Keep in mind, engine coolant is toxic and should be disposed of properly. This is a perfectly ...


4

As long as you don't mix the two coolants together you should not have any problem. I run "green" coolant in my GM that came with Dexcool, and have been for more than 5 years. You do want to check the ratio of coolant and water as straight coolant (or too much compared to water) will not cool as well. To answer your question I wouldn't bother switching, if ...


4

It looks an awful lot like you have diagnosed all of the really hard problems and come up negative. I wonder if you have a simple mechanical problem: is the linkage sound between the hot / cold selector and the flapper valve that forces air past the heater core. From what I hear, the foam around the flapper is also prone to disintegration in humid ...


4

I can't speak for GM, but one reason they may be doing it is that they have a reputation for overheating under heavy use (heavy towing on the trucks and track days for the cars) amongst motorsports enthusiasts. Bumping it up a few psi is relatively safe for the cars and may well be enough to help keep the overheating under control.


4

Straight coolant does not have the cooling properties of water. Straight water causes corrosion, freezes at too high of a temperature, and boils at too low of a temperature. The range to shoot for is between 50/50 to 70/30 Coolant/water


4

If you want to know for sure, you can ask the dealer what they use. It would be good to know for the future anyway. There are two main types of anti freeze, generally they all use ethylene glycol as the coolant base; though they differ in the type of corrosion inhibitors used. "Traditional" coolants (often green or yellow) generally use silicates, while ...


4

I think the likely suspect here is engine oil. If your head gasket is blown it is not unusual for oil to get into the coolant or the other way around. Coolant is being circulated through the engine very close to where oil is being circulated through the engine. Consider doing a compression test and/or a leak down test.


4

Adding antifreeze to water in your radiator will not make it run hot, unless you are have a very high portion of antifreeze to water. Antifreeze/coolant raises the boiling point of water to keep it from boiling out and lowers the freezing point to keep it from freezing up. If it is full of water now and there is no room for antifreeze. Then drain the ...



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