Hot answers tagged

21

I have heard (from an auto store clerk) that running just water will cause overheating. Well, that's not true. Water isn't the cause of overheating. Your coolant mixture (of whatever proportion) and radiator work together to get rid of the heat. If it's not hot, you won't overheat. However, when it is hot, the coolant can only absorb heat up to its ...


20

"Is it safe to continue driving with low coolant as long as I continue to watch the temperature gauge? " No, the temp sensor reads coolant temperature, if the coolant gets low enough to be below the temp sensor, now the sensor is reading metal temperature of the area it is screwed into (usually cylinder head), by the time it reads too hot on the gauge the ...


17

I would like to drive the car to the nearest qualified service, but there is a fair distance to it (about 8km) as I'm living in a remote location. Is it safe to drive it that distance if I refill the entire coolant tank? I would say yes, you can drive the car. Load the car with much more water than you think necessary: I find that two liter ...


13

Lets start with the fact that Ford doesn't make anti-freeze, they buy it in. It will have certain specs of course but so does all anti-freeze. It will also be made by one of the major producers of the product. If you can find the Ford specs you could compare it to other brands. Alternatively, contact the makers of different brands of anti-freeze and ask them ...


12

There are silicate antifreezes, used in most domestic cars until recent years, and OAT antifreezes, used in Japanese cars because of their domestic market testing, where the silicate is replaced with phosphates. Domestic cars today all use OAT now, with Chrysler the last to switch. See: http://www.sae.org/mags/aei/mater/11284 Any OAT antifreeze will work ...


12

Number one answer is always Head Gasket. The reason is that there are oil and water passages in close proximity, being separated by a gasket (which might just be flimsy paper or rubber, but is often steel or copper) sandwiched between two pieces of metal with (usually) different thermal expansion rates. This means that any time your engine gets far enough ...


11

The most likely source is the head gasket. There are very few other ways (short of catastrophic engine failure - and that would give other symptoms!) of the two mixing. Check for excessive smoke (oil getting into the bores), coolant loss (coolant getting into the bores) and a mayonnaise effect in the oil (coolant getting into the oil) You don't say what ...


11

Every manufacturer recommends their own fluids. Everybody wins because your engine gets "less corrosion" and they great great markup on those things. A while ago I did cooling system maintenance (replace hoses, water pump, thermostat, temp sensor, radiator cap) on my wife's BMW 330i. That make/model has a lot of following and several high-quality forums ...


10

If you haven't run the car yet then just drain out the reservoir. If you have run the car then some of the fluid might have started to circulate through the cooling system. If so, flush your coolant. A small amount should not affect the car's ability to stay cool. So this is not that critical, but you definitely don't want to let your engine overheat.


10

Normally, I would ask first in a comment but that seems to be a privilege not available to new users, so here goes: Are you sure it was the radiator cap and not the overflow bottle? The radiator is usually full and getting 100ml in would be a struggle, not to mention that the green coolant would be staring you in the face. If you radiator wasn't full then ...


10

If you do not have any leaks, then your coolant is most likely getting burned and/or going into your oil. My guess is going to be a problem with your head gasket or some crack or warping in the head. I believe coolant in oil used to turn oil more brown and make it more foamy or milky. These days, the detergents and dispersants in modern oil can reduce ...


9

As long as you don't mix the two coolants together you should not have any problem. I run "green" coolant in my GM that came with Dexcool, and have been for more than 5 years. You do want to check the ratio of coolant and water as straight coolant (or too much compared to water) will not cool as well. To answer your question I wouldn't bother switching, if ...


9

Yes what you presume is correct. Depending on total volume of coolant (different for each vehicle) how much pure AF I put in, anywhere from 1/2 to 1 gallon, then top off with 50/50 mix. It is better to be over the 50% mix than under, you can go as high as 70%, so don't worry about putting a little too much pure AF after flushing the cooling system with ...


8

Following up on @Nick C's answer: The head gasket almost certainly needs to be replaced and, on some cars, replacing the head gasket is straightforward work with the right tools and procedures. However, on some seemingly mainstream cars, this is not the case. In order of ease of access to the head gasket, I would rate the common designs as follows: ...


8

Any car in good operating condition should be able to make the trip. My advice would be to: 1) Fix any known problems with the car. This includes making sure the spare tire is in good shape and fully inflated. 2) If your car consumes oil between changes, bring along a spare quart or two. A long road trip can cause an apparent increase in consumption as ...


8

First, you do need to find out where the coolant is going. There is UV dye that can help with this, and if your car is smoking, that could be a sign that the coolant is leaking into the engine rather than on the ground. For the main question, "Is it safe", as long as you keep an eye on the temperature and it's not getting too high, you should be OK in the ...


8

The coolant capacity of the 2004 TOYOTA COROLLA 1.8L 4-cyl Engine Code [R] 1ZZ-FE is 6.9 quarts. To accurately ensure you have a 50/50 mix in your system after a flush (assuming you actually flush it until you have clear liquid draining out), is to add 1/2 of the coolant as straight coolant (not 50/50 mix), then fill the rest as distilled water. For ...


7

The main ingredient in automotive antifreeze, Ethylene glycol, has a higher boiling point when mixed with water than water alone. Wherever you live, I bet it's not Arizona or Texas. Steam voids suck, you don't want any in your cooling system. Antifreeze also contains corrosion inhibitors. I bet you don't have hard water, either.


7

First thing I'd try to figure out is how quickly it leaks - run it, stick your head underneath it as check if there is any visible leaking. If there is, chances are that it's not going to make it for 30 miles. I'd also check for any evidence of oil and water mixing. If there is, don't drive it. If it's not leaking that badly I'd be tempted to top it up with ...


7

I agree with Timo - if it is a big enough leak that you can see it clearly, then getting the car transported is much safer. In general, using water as coolant is OK for a short time or as a "get you home" alternative, but it does not have the anti-freeze and corrosion inhibiting properties of a proper coolant mix, so should not be left in the engine for ...


7

Bank 1 on your 3800 Series II Engine would be the set of cylinders that is closer to the front bumper of the vehicle (cylinders 1, 3, 5). Bank 2 (cylinders 2, 4, 6) would be against the firewall. The Leak... Any vacuum-leak hunt shouldn't start without having a clear vacuum-hose diagram in-hand. There should be one on a placard inside the engine bay ...


7

This is the heater valve. It's Motocraft part# YG350:


7

If you can see and access the crack, a two-part epoxy or something like JB-Weld can be great for a temporary fix. This page shows the process on a metal radiator for a race car, but your fix would be similar. Clean the site of the repair, and rough up the surface with fine sand paper, especially if working on plastic. Mix the two-part epoxy and generously ...


7

I do not understand why the coolant system needs a bleed screw at all Because air pockets. Filling up coolant doesn't necessitate that the entire system will be filled with coolant. There are parts of your cooling system that will trap air when it is refilled. The bleed screw is a means to expel the trapped air from the system. I repeatedly fill ...


7

This particular bottle is knows as a degas bottle. The reason it has a strange shape is two fold. First, the bottle needs to fit somewhere and the shape helps that. Second and more important is that these degas bottles hold pressure. The shape reinforces the bottle so that it does not explode. In cooling systems with degas bottles the coolant does not ...


7

If your normal journeys get the car up to temperature and you have trusted it so far, then a long journey should make no difference, in fact cruising speeds should be easier on the car than constant stopping and starting. If you currently don't loose any fluids and there are are no strange noises, then I wouldn't worry. But if you really need confirmation, ...


6

Antifreeze is a blend of several different ingredients: the antifreeze/coolant active ingredient, (mostly) water, corrosion inhibitors to prevent the water from rusting away the inside of your engine, and a secret blend of herbs and spices that's particular to each manufacturer. There are several different choices for the active ingredient (ethylene ...


6

The very first thing that you should check is whether you actually made a mistake and, if so, which one. A cap that says "ATF oil only" is for automatic transmission fluid. If you're adding engine oil to the transmission, that's going to make your transmission very unhappy. It is fixable: you'll need to drain the transmission fluid and replace it. If ...


6

The main thing the higher pressure cap will do is to increase the boiling point of the coolant slightly. 3psi isn't going to make a huge difference, but it will make some difference. If your cooling system is in good shape, the higher pressure unlikely to cause problems. If your cooling system is already on the way out, well, then it'll be on the way out a ...


6

Without water and without antifreeze or just without antifreeze? I'll assume that you mean without either, but you should clarify the difference in the future. This is really simple though. The engine will overheat, quickly, and the seals and gaskets will give out, letting fluids leak in and out of places they should or shouldn't be. Eventually, parts of ...



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