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4

Your most expensive problem is that a V-tec motor is designed to operate at higher RPM's than your motor can handle. This would mean that you'd have to get stronger pistons and connecting rods (or conrods as they're referred to). You'd also need to upgrade your valve springs to cope with the higher RPM and you might also have to get a new camshaft. All in ...


3

If you were to simply replace the existing petrol engine with an electric motor, then yes, it would ruin the gearbox very quickly, as it won't be able to handle that amount of torque. However, even if the transmission would cope, that wouldn't be the best way of doing it - an electric motor has a very different torque curve to an internal combustion engine, ...


3

The biggest issue with electric vehicles is weight. Accelerating and hill climbing both take energy in proportion to weight. Batteries are really heavy; you end up with a lot of capacity just to haul around your capacity. Batteries are also expensive, tricky to charge correctly, and have a limited lifetime. This is why the electric and hybrid production ...


3

Off the top of my head, the easiest way to get there would be using some sort of hobbyist microcontroller board, such as an Arduino. You'll need to add encoders since most of the data you'll be receiving will be analog. Since the CPU for your board will include timing by default, you can calculate time-based measurements (RPM, MPH, etc) from that. ...


3

Checkout the Auto AC board at AC Source There are some good people on there. Don's right. You do need to flush the old oil out of the system because they don't mix. Also it's difficult to flush the compressor so odds are it will not last i you don't replace it. The best thing to do is change the compressor out if its older at the same time, replacing all ...


2

I have done it before. I just replaced all the seals and o-rings, cleaned out all of the old oil and then refilled with r-134a. That's about it. I did it on an '86 Volvo 740 and it worked really well.


2

Sounds like a lot of work for little gain. Consider doing slightly more work for much greater gains with something along the lines of an AEM EMS: http://www.aemelectronics.com/engine-management-systems-9/plug-play-engine-management-systems-ems-10/ Not the only game in town, but it is probably the most popular. Probably 90% of the standalone EMS ...


2

Most conversions fall into three types. A direct replacement from a similar vehicle maybe a later year that came with discs. A system transplant from a factory equiped vehicle not necessarily the same brand. A complete custom sytem from an aftermarket source.The pros are the same obvious reasons new vehicles come with disc brakes.They self adjust, they stop ...


2

There is a company on the web called Phoenix Casting & Machine. They make adapter plates to mate automotive transmissions to non-automotive engines (they also make the spacers for the flywheel to compensate). The SD33T was originally designed as a fork lift engine. If I read the specs right, it has an SAE #3 transmission mount bolt pattern. This is why ...


2

A plate between the flywheel housing on the engine and the bell housing of the gearbox would almost certainly be required to mount the gearbox. This would be no problem to produce with a CNC machine. The problems that then arise would be to reconcile the differances in the two gearboxes. Will the gearbox obstruct the clutch assembly in any way? Will the ...


2

Buy a Civic NG or similiar. It's the same thing as trying to add 4WD to a 2WD car. It's just easier to buy the right one to start with. Financially you would never recoup the cost over buying a purpose built CNG car. Many automakers build them for fleet sales and the US Govt has a lot in the GSA fleet. These vehicles get sold at auction and sometimes have ...


2

In order to convert the vehicle you would need the following items: Fuel tank. They make a few different versions of these. They more money you spend the stronger, smaller, and, lighter it will be. You can get these built from a cheap all-metal heavy designs (steel/aluminum. To an expensive extremely light weight and much smaller designs (plastic fully ...


2

They will almost certainly be a mirror image of each other. Looking at your diagram, it appears the left hand arm (i.e. that going to parts 5 and 6) is longer than the other, and has a slight curve to it. You might find you can use some of the parts from the LHD one to repair the motor of the RHD one, but probably not as they are usually sealed units these ...


1

You won't lose e-brake as it is located on driveshaft. Nice feature of FJ-40. With front hubs locked you get 4-wheel e-braking.


1

Later model 40 series does have front discs, but as far as I know you will need brackets welded for holding the calipers. You'll loose your parking brake, so you have to think about that too. I know that TSM have a kit for the front and 2 others for the rear that don't require welding, but I never read feedback for thoses kits. They claims that the 15" ...


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I eventually discovered there are basically two ways to do this. One is to use the part FossilizedCarlos mentioned, but you must also get an alternator spacer set, or else the brackets do not help much. I had previously purchased the bracket set but couldn't figure out how it was supposed to help. The spacer set is the missing link, although they are hard ...


1

Would something like this(1965-67 MOPAR BIG BLOCK W/O AC ALTERNATOR BRACKET SET) work?


1

http://www.e-volks.com/ makes a generic conversion kit for cars up to 3500 pounds with a manual transmission. It would require machining a conversion plate and shaft coupler, but aside from that installation seems straightforward. Other concerns, however, are finding replacements for the A/C, heater, and vacuum brake-boosting systems, as the electric motor ...


1

OBD-II didn't become standard until 1996; some 30+ years later. And to make matters worst, the CAN2.0 spec (ISO15765) was sort of solidified in 2008 even though it was around a bit longer. Still, with CAN, it's just a signaling spec. You still need something known as a DBC file to decode CAN data..



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