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9

In very cold climates there are electric heaters that replace the dip stick. They are plugged into an AC outlet and because they reach the oil pan they can apply heat directly to the oil. That way the oil doesn't get cold to the point where it totally looses it's ability to keep your engine protected at start up. It's plugging in that electric heater that ...


8

Yes this is bad for your engine for a multitude of reasons. In fact, it's not good to run your engine at full throttle for extended periods of time unless the engine is designed to take it, whether it's cold or warmed up. Believe me when I say your little 1.2l Agila engine is not designed to take that kind of stress. I'll start by suggesting that engines, ...


7

Yes, cold starts are hard on engines, this is very common advice. Restarting the engine when you get home should be less of a concern though since the engine is already warmed up. If all you're doing is getting out of the car to close your garage, just leave the engine running, you're not saving yourself any gas by starting it twice. Not only will doing ...


6

It sounds like your clutch master cylinder is initially letting fluid past the piston seals. Pumping the clutch pedal sounds like it gets the piston sealing again so that the clutch starts to work. I am presuming that the clutch and brake both share the same reservoir and that you are not loosing fluid and not having to keep filling it up. Is that correct? ...


5

There are two things I'd look at as the problem. First and most likely is the solenoid on the starter is almost shot. The solenoid has a large copper washer which is pressed into the two posts (one from the battery connection and the other going to the starter motor). When this wears out, you'll get a clicking sound (almost a dead thud) as the Bendix is ...


5

Pretty Common Problem with the Duke 390 This is a very common issue with the KTM 390. There are dozens of posts regarding customers who are experiencing the same exact issue. Additionally, there are a few YouTube video's that show the problem happening pretty consistently. The various proposed issues related by customers seem to revolve around these ...


5

Warmer weather this weekend provided an opportunity to try to get the bike running again. I wanted to give myself the best shot possible, so I installed new spark plugs and picked up some starting fluid. I also found the source of the change in exhaust note that occurred after the backfires. In fact, the difference was on the intake side--the air box had ...


5

Ice Probably the most common problem that people have is when their car is parked in a moist environment below degrees, resulting in ice forming on some or all of the windows. To resolve this problem, see this answer. Battery Another problem that is quite common (this happened to me recently), is if you have a car with a car battery that is in poor ...


5

The main problem would be the battery, as already pointed out. In low temperatures batteries tend to lose power, and for batteries near the end of their lifetime this means that you won't have enough current to turn the engine. Another problem would be the wrong oil chosen for the engine. Oils have grades based on their viscosity in certain temperatures - ...


5

Not familiar with your vehicle/engine specifically, but familiar with carbed engines in general. I would think the #1 thing to look at would be the choke. Pumping before starting a carb vehicle is normal. It gives it a squirt of fuel and sets the choke. The low RPM indicates that the high idle is not set, which likely means the choke is not set also. ...


4

There are 3 areas to focus on: Battery: Make sure your battery can still hold a charge well as cold is going to show problems first. Double check that your battery cables are tight and not overly corroded. Starter: As Bob asked, if the starter is the original it could be going bad and struggling under only tough conditions Electrical/Ignition Switch: ...


4

I believe the key clue here is the fact the engine runs rough for a few minutes. This tells me that the cold-start enrichment, where the air-fuel mixture entering the cylinders is slightly rich, isn't taking place. You may be looking at partially clogged injectors causing this. The reason I think this is the cause is that you've ruled out fuel rail ...


4

I believe the key clue here is the fact the engine runs rough for a few minutes. This tells me that the cold-start enrichment, where the air-fuel mixture entering the cylinders is slightly rich, isn't taking place. There are a few possible reasons for this: insufficient fuel pressure To rule this out, have the fuel rail pressure tested to make sure that ...


4

A car battery's power will drop with temperature. It would be my first port of call. Since the car ran fine when you had it jumpstarted with the help of your friend, I would have the battery tested to make sure that it can deliver sufficient juice to the starter.


4

It depends on the oil that you use on your scooter, If you are using heavy oil then the cold start is going to be a problem, I have a 150 cc Gy6, I use lighter oil like 5w-40 and I had no problem, but if you are using any other oil that has higher viscosity than 5w-40, you better switch back to the 5w-40. The manual suggests 75w but most people use 5w-40. I ...


4

It may be the starter but you'd want to check for battery voltage at the B terminal on the starter and check that the circuit on the S terminal is OK first. When checking the S terminal have someone turn the key to the crank position. Also it would be a good idea to check that the starter is grounded properly. If you have power on both terminals and the ...


3

This may sound strange but try preforming an induction service. There is a condition that can sometimes occur where excessive carbon builds up on the intake valves. When carbon is cold it is porous and can absorb gasoline keeping it from getting into the cylinders. Eventually the carbon becomes saturated and fuel enters the cylinders. When the carbon gets ...


3

Firstly This is common on high capacity single cylinder engines where the compression ratios are very high compared to relatively sized multi cylinder engines. I have ridden a KTM 390 and I have faced this issue sometimes, getting it to restart is a pain, trust me its normal behaviour there is no fault or issue with the bike, its just the way the bike is ...


3

As Hillsons said, cold starts are hard. So are warm starts, but to a lesser degree. The engine has no oil pressure when off, and starting it again causes very slight but very bad metal on metal contact. When warm this is much less contact than when cold, as the oil is usually primed and circulated. When cold the oil settles a bit and moves away from ...


3

One possibility is low cylinder compression, either due to gases getting passed the piston rings or passed poorly seating valves. If gasses are getting passed the rings, this could possibly be detected by removing the oil filler cap while the engine is running, if you then put your hand over the filler and feel a large volume of gas being blown out of the ...


3

Batteries perform better when they aren't cold so often the first time a battery fails is when it is cold so if you could heat it up a bit it would probably start the car. This may be way cars mysteriously start after sitting in the sun for a while. Also it may be harder to turn over a cold engine than a warm one so it would require a greater current draw. ...


3

I have experienced the same symptoms on an engine, where the MAF sensor was giving lower than expected readings. The engine would only run for a few seconds before stalling. A new MAF sensor fixed the problem. I tested my MAF on the bench with a hair dryer and a multimeter. It wasn't until I got a replacement that I could see how low a reading the faulty ...


3

I agree with @HandyHowie in that it sounds like your clutch master cylinder is on the way out. Something to check before you go this route, though, is the hydraulic fluid level for the clutch. Looking at the parts involved, it looks as though while the master cylinder reservoir is remote (not attached directly to the master cylinder), it doesn't pull fluid ...


2

I have seem auto mufflers split wide open by an exhaust backfire. Back in the mid 70's and early 80's it used to be one of the top reasons for muffler warranty rejection. You may have damaged a single or several of the internal baffles in the mufflers. This may or may not be a problem. If it is now loud enough it to be a considered an nuisance by local law ...


2

I would not worry too much about whether you are going to run out of battery power, especially if you keep the remote-start at a .8 second crank time. You will not burn up enough battery juice to cause yourself any issues. Your battery has several identifiers associated with it. A common one is CCA or Cold Cranking Amps. This shows you what the power output ...


2

I have a 86 motor in my 94 K75, they are 5hp more than later models. One thing tn that is common on K's is leaking exhaust at header pipes. The bike will backfire when you let off the throttle in gear. The copper gasket rings collapse causing cold air to suck back into exhaust. I found Honda motorcycle exhaust header gaskets exact same size but will have to ...


2

Honda assigns the P1399 code for random misfires. On some models this is caused by a clogged EGR Port. The Valve clearance may also be an issue. Another possible cause is the intake air temperature sensor. If it's reading incorrectly it can cause the cold start problem you are having, an possibly even the high speed problem as well.


2

If your bike is sitting for long periods in extreme cold the cover will not help with cold exposure. Wind chill has no effect on inanimate objects. The cover design and material are the biggest factors determining whether or not it is suitable for long term use. As long as the humidity level is fairly low (as it would be in -20 degree temps) the cover won't ...


2

It is a carburetor problem, but only because the fuel and air mixture is too lean. In cold environment there is more oxygen in the air, which increases the amount of "air" in the air-fuel mixture. This is further proven by the fact you have to accelerate to keep the bike alive - by accelerating you use parts of the carb only used in medium/high openings, ...


2

Check the fuel pressure after several hours of sitting, like in the morning before you start it or turn the key over. This could be a case of an injector leaking into a cylinder, causing a flooded effect. You could leave the pressure gauge on it over night to check in the morning. The pressure should hold most if not all of the pressure, even for that amount ...



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