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3

It could be: new parts parts removed and replaced as part of the service work parts that may have been close to worn out that may have been stressed past their limits by the work Or it could even be coincidental - your car is reasonably old and things can just fail. Unfortunately this is just too broad. Sounds like the mechanics are going through ...


2

Throw out bearings (TOB) usually make noise when only when you press the clutch pedal. The reason for this is, it is the only time it is engaged and actually can make a noise. If you are hearing this particular noise at 2000-3000 rpm when you aren't actuating the clutch, this can be ruled out almost immediately. Input shaft bearing will make noise most of ...


2

Sounds like the throwout bearing if you're hearing it mainly when you're operating the clutch pedal. Some vehicles do have an inspection port on the gearboxes bell housing, however in a lot of cases, removal of the gearbox and/or bell housing is required.


1

In any motorcyle you CAN shift into gear without using the clutch, you have to match the engine speed with the output speed, many people use it for racing, and if done correctly does not cause excesive wear, but for normal use, it is not recommended. now when you say it wont shift into gear, do you mean the shifter just come to a halt before the shift ...


-1

This sounds like the kickstand safety switch has gone astray. Almost like the switch gets stuck and the bike thinks the kickstand is still down when its not. After 'wobbling' the bike, the switch gets unstuck?


0

According to the OP's last comment, the rattle was due to a broken crankshaft. I will add one thing though. When I was a kid, my father had a '91 Mitsubishi Pajero that suddenly had its crankshaft snap in two. He was able to drive it to the dealership with a rattling noise that was present regardless of clutch position or RPM. With regards to the OP's ...


2

This can be made to work well. As a teenager I tried the technique seen from Mad Max, with an old rear wheel drive car. While travelling forward at speed, press the clutch fully in, allow the engine revs to drop so no load on gears. Then change into reverse, raise the revs to a high level (thinking nearly red-line) and dump the clutch. As long as you keep ...


1

Yes and no. Yes the engine would in theory be forced to rotate in reverse. No in practice because the extreme torque shock would simply strip the clutch shaft splines or even completely screw the shaft in two. Please don't try this at home...


4

A High School auto shop teacher about 35 years as an experiment on a old shop car managed to do precisely that. Got the old car to 60+ MPH and slammed into reverse--suffice it to say it was not pretty. Idler shaft milled like a lathe, the gears....you don't wanna know...LOL


5

If it is a slipping clutch it will get worse soon, and you will know for sure, from your description, yes it is slipping. Yours is a FWD car, they are a bit more difficult than a RWD most of the time, you will need an engine support bar to hold the engine while you remove the transmission, after the trans is out this support bar will suspend the engine so ...


3

You can ride it up but not hard at all That spider spring works in conjunction with the ramps in the rear to all the clutch to slip under engine breaking that exceeds the redline of the bike. So you won't want to be downshifting from 5th redline to 2nd gear until you get this fixed. You are very lucky the spring losing it's two arms didn't do more damage. ...


1

Let's put it this way. You burned your clutch. If your clutch got stuck, you could just take it back and may be get it fixed under warranty, because it would be engagement mechanism, not the clutch disk. But by doing this: "Rev counter maxes out and car goes no where until pedal comes back up!" you burned your clutch, and most likely flywheel as well, so ...


0

The fact that you stalled the car uphill and that it is acting that have most likely nothing in common. Gear knob vibration is quite normal on older cars. Also, when car is on low RPM under load, vibrations tend to be more prominent in manual transmission cars. Start with driving the car on the flat surface to see if it's accelerating as expected. If the ...


6

My theory is that the engine would be forced to rotate the other way around, wouldn't it? Then, because of that, the engine would stop, and therefore it will "generate" a lot of force to the transmission and cause the car to reduce speed (all of this, if nothing breaks, of course) Put simply, in most cases, the motor will stall and the tires will lock. ...


4

It's fine I did a similar job on a 2003 model recently. I kid car. Luckily, I didn't have any bent valves to deal with. Turning the engine over with the head off and the car in gear won't hurt anything. I know the exact feeling of elasticity you are talking about if you have the car in gear. I am assuming you had the front wheels on the ground when you ...



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