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6

To get us on the same footing, I'm going to assume by saying "clutch pressed halfway" you are suggesting the clutch be halfway engaged (meaning, you are still getting power from the engine, but it's not fully engaged). What you are talking about is called slipping the clutch. It is a process whereby you can get the engine within the power/torque band ...


4

No,engine control unit will prevent engine stall if cluch pedal is pressed during engine brake activation. There is a small switch on top of clutch pedal in modern vehicles.This will be used to sense clutch pedal press. Truck control unit senses clutch pedal press and deactivates engine brake. An example can be seen here: When clutch pedal is pressed, ...


-1

There are two sides to this topic: 1) As you depress the clutch the input shaft is disconnected from the crank -> Less strain on the starter and the battery/electrical system. This is all nice and dandy, HOWEVER: 2) By pressing down the clutch pedal you put an axial load on the crankshaft. This will lead to increased wear on the thrust bearing (The one ...


6

When you are traveling 20-30 mph, shift into high gear (6th IIRC) and push the gas 1/2 to 3/4 of the way down. If you see the RPM rise with no immediate increase in speed, the clutch is worn to the point that it is slipping. The amount of time between slight slippage and total failure is usually not very long. For a higher power car, you can expect to ...


3

By matching the engine RPM to the revs in the gearbox, the 'synchro rings' that automatically match the gear speeds in the gearbox for you have less to do. If you are clutchless changing all the time these wear out quickly since you are unlikely to match gear speeds well every time. When you din't the synchro rings an gears have to match the speed of the ...


9

Heel-Toe shifting and clutchless shifting are 2 different things. I guess they can be done together.... The one thing both of these techniques have in common is rev matching. There is the RPM you are at when you come out of a gear, and the RPM you will be at when you go into the next (or previous) gear. When you rev match, you try and have the engine RPM ...


-2

For one thing, letting off the gas and, not pressing the clutch should help slow the car better, then hitting the brakes alone with the car in let's call it neutral. because the transmission will help slow the vehicle with the deceleration of the engine. As for "riding the clutch" keep your foot off of it yes it will wear out the moving parts in your ...


1

I haven't owned a bike that hasn't been awkward to get into neutral while stationary at some point, my Bandit was the worst for it. I found that it's usually easier to find neutral while the bike is still moving so I got into the habit of engaging neutral as I come to a stop rather than after I've stopped.


2

Firstly, check for any signs of fluid leak (if you've not done so already) - has the level in the reservoir changed? (fluid leaks aren't always obvious, the level changing is the best indication) How old is the truck, and when was the fluid last changed? It might be worth changing it anyway... The fact that you can change the behaviour by pumping it ...


1

Vacuum leak and sounds like you need to bleed your clutch. Bleeding the clutch is not that hard. For the vacuum leak, the main place you want to check is the actuator that should be under the battery tray. Look around for cracked lines, or lines that look older. Now to bleed the clutch, you want to follow the lines that go under the vehicle and there will ...


3

This is addition to Paulster's answer. Here's an animation The disc in Grey is the flywheel Wikipedia provides a good general outline - A flywheel is a rotating mechanical device that is used to store rotational energy. ... - Providing continuous energy when the energy source is discontinuous. For example, flywheels are used in reciprocating ...


3

To add a bit to Sweber's post. There are also multi-plate clutches that are you used in most motorcycles and very frequently in automobile racing like IRL and F1. A good video on multi-plate clutches.


7

In general, a clutch is a part which allows to connect / disconnect two shafts also while they are rotating. The most simple clutch consists of to discs, each firmly attached to one shaft. Press them together, and the friction between them allows to transfer torque from the one shaft to the other. Pull them apart, and the shafts aren't connected any more, ...


2

A clutch works in exactly the same way as your brakes. The flywheel is just a big metal disk at the end of the crankshaft. Your clutch plate is a round piece of friction material (just like a brake disk) that is pressed hard onto the flywheel so it can transfer the power from the engine to the transmission (and from there to to wheels). When you press the ...


6

A flywheel serves four main purposes (in most vehicles): It provides mass for rotational inertia to keep the engine in motion It is specifically weighted to provide balance for the crankshaft It provides a means to get the engine started (starter ring) It provides a connection for power transfer between the engine and transmission (along with the clutch ...



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