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9

Holding the clutch in is generally not a good idea. The clutch is designed to be used for very short periods between gears, and for holding in first when you are about to pull away. So if you are wanting to coast you should definitely do it in neutral. The difference between these two from a fuel consumption perspective should be marginal. From a safety ...


9

Is it ok to give gas while releasing the clutch? Yes, but your goal is to give exactly the right amount of gas. The thing to remember is that the clutch is a consumable part (it's really a whole system of parts that can be consumed but let's pretend that it's a single unique piece for the sake of discussion). As such, it has a finite supply of work ...


8

It sounds like the clutch is worn out... You can usually tell by gradually applying the gas in the top gear, probably around 2,500 RPM, and the car should accelerate a little bit, but at some point as you press the gas further and further down, you will feel it release and the revolutions will shoot way up without road speed increasing. It basically feels ...


7

The short answer is probably no, this is not bad. Inconvenient at times but likely just fine. The longer answer requires a little more information: Is the clutch fully disengaged after it's depressed past that 2 inch mark? Or is that just the point at which it really catches? It's possible that the clutch is still slipping at that point, making for a ...


7

If you match revs correctly you should be able to change gear with no ill effects at all. The challenge is of course to match revs. This is pretty easy when accelerating, but when decelerating you'll need to use the accelerator to bump the engine revs up to match. Google for heel-and-toe (this also helps make for faster downshifts when using the clutch) ...


7

Most likely cause is a worn or misadjusted clutch. The clutch disc is slipping meaning that all the engines power is not being transmitted to the transmission. Cost of a clutch replacement is to varied to give an accurate estimate. Clarification Note Energy will always take the path of least resistance. From a clutch's perspective, it is much more ...


6

Is the clutch cable operated or hydraulic? On hydraulic clutches that's a common symptom of a failing master and/or slave cylinder(s).


6

To replace the clutch technically you only need a new clutch. However most people will purchase a Clutch Kit that will usually contain Clutch Pressure Plate Thrust/ Release Bearing Pilot/Spigot Bearing Alignment Tool The last 2 items are not always included in a clutch kit and they are not always necessary, although an alignment tool does make life a ...


6

It sounds like they're trying to take you for a ride to me. I can't see how driving style could cause the slave cylinder to fail - they're separated by a mechanical linkage. I would also dispute that anyone could destroy a clutch with 32k of normal driving - I'd expect it to last at least twice that long. However, a leaking cylinder might cause ...


5

How does the pedal feel? Does it have the same resistance as normal, or does it feel really soft, and go straight to the floor? If it it the latter, chances are you have air in the system, or a leak - check the fluid level in the reservoir (which should look similar to the brake one, but usually smaller). If it feels normal, there could still be a small ...


5

It could be the thrust bearing of the clutch that's worn down. It makes a whining noise when the clutch is disengaged and it reguires replacing the clutch and thrust bearing to solve this.


5

Sounds like the clutch master cylinder is leaking. If you pump up the pedal with your foot, it might retain pressure for you to drive for a while, but after it sits, the symptoms will return. Time to replace the clutch master cylinder or check for brake line leaks.


5

In regards to the SRT-4 what I'm reading is the modular clutch is an all-in-one setup. The pressure plate, clutch disc and flywheel are a pre-assembled piece that mounts onto a "flex-plate". The flex-plate is mounted where on most cars the flywheel is (to the crank and teeth on the outer edge for the starter motor). Apparently this is mainly just an ease ...


5

I'm afraid it sounds like you are being taken for a ride there :( Clutches should last tens of thousands of miles, so if they are failing within a couple of months then there must be an external influence (or you're driving like Colin McRae...) In my experience, a clutch failing to disengage is more often a failure in the clutch release mechanism than the ...


5

DURING cranking, in Neutral, the car races forward The transmission is not in neutral, no other explanation. Check the shifter linkage, it may be out of adjustment, or bent. Those are the most likely causes IMO based on the fact that you put a clutch in the vehicle and the linkage would have been disconnected and reconnected in that process. The ...


5

When was the last time the transmission's gear oil was changed? If it has been a while (or never), get it changed. Check your manual for the recommended interval, this is one of the fluids that is often overlooked. If it has never been done on a 2003, it needs to be done.


5

Sounds like something went wrong with the pressure plate... Diaphragm spring snapped or something? Never heard of it before but anything is possible. Might as well replace it and make sure the slave cylinder/throwout bearing are properly adjusted.


5

Most vehicles with a standard transmission now use a hydraulic clutch. The clutch system consists of a reservoir with master cylinder, some tubing, and a slave cylinder. It works in a similar manner as your brakes. Pushing the pedal forces a fluid into the slave cylinder. The slave cylinder applies a force to the throw out bearing which causes the clutch to ...


4

With the vehicle stopped, and in a safe place, start out in 4th gear, and slowly release the clutch while giving the engine gas. If the clutch is in good condition, the car should stall - if there's any slipping, you'll probably feel it, and should disengage the clutch right away to prevent further damage. If the car happens to start going without ...


4

That sounds like a clutch that's reached the end of the line. If you're applying throttle and the rev's start to climb faster than the car is accelerating then the clutch is slipping. A clutch can go that quickly... depends on driver skill. I've seen clutches last 180k and still look fresh. There are other folks that have destroyed their clutches in less ...


4

Having owned cars with both, I can't say I've noticed any significant performance difference between the two. I can't see any reason why a hydraulic one would be slower or more sluggish than a cable one - bear in mind they both work on the same principle, just that a hydraulic system pushes an incompressible inner medium (the fluid) through a flexible outer ...


4

It sounds like one of your main bearings is going out in your transmission, either at the front or the back of the transmission (probably the front). When your transmission is under load (clutch engaged, in gear), you won't necessarily hear it. Load can happen either during acceleration or deceleration. If you are really paying attention and it is loud ...


3

The main difference of DOT3 and DOT4 is boiling point of the fluid. The DOT3 standard has a lower minimum boiling point requirement then DOT4. Not all fluids are made equal and they will all typically list what both their Dry and Wet boiling points are. You can have one DOT3 fluid that just barely makes it past the standard, then another that can handle ...


3

Alternatively, get to highway speed in your highest gear and floor it. If the RPMs shoot up, you've got slippage.


3

Apart from NoCarrier's good point about the master cylinder, the other side might also be a problem: the slave cylinder. I had an older Triumph that needed both ends fixed to finally fix the clutch. It turned out the slave cylinder walls had developed rust, which gradually wore down the seals. Having the slave re-sleeved (and new seals!) was also ...


3

I don't think the Neutral Safety Switch can jam a transmission, but the throw out bearing in the clutch can do this. I doubt it would be a sychro, but you never know. How many miles on the car/clutch?


3

This thread describes a similar problem on a different model year. That said, the symptoms sound strikingly familiar (from the first post in that thread): Make absolutely sure the hole in the bracket is not worn! It should be round with a notch in the top for the new bushing to key into. If the hole is worn even slightly, it's going to have to come ...


3

As mike mentioned in the comments without the specific make model the numbers won't do you much good. Professionals use a labor time guide to look up the amount of labor time to charge for a job. Labor time guides are used because times for a job vary wildly from on year to the next, engine size, make, model etc. Some vehicles will require the sub-frame and ...


3

I think your question may be misguided. The final effect you seem to be looking for is to be able to cruise at a specific speed while using the least amount of petrol, is that correct? This is absolutely possible in modern internal combustion engine cars. You don't do it by turning the engine off and on again, or by depressing the clutch to let the car ...


3

It is likely the dual mass flywheel you found was for the diesel Astra. Some petrol engined cars do use them, but the Astra isn't one of them. Even if it was, failure of a petrol flywheel is very rare anyway - are you positive you need a new flywheel? Regardless, you should trust your mechanic or not use them at all. This sounds like a straightforward ...



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