Hot answers tagged

18

Holding the clutch in is generally not a good idea. The clutch is designed to be used for very short periods between gears, and for holding in first when you are about to pull away. So if you are wanting to coast you should definitely do it in neutral. The difference between these two from a fuel consumption perspective should be marginal. From a safety ...


15

It absolutely does. It's called riding the clutch. Even though you "believe" you just have your foot there, it forces the pedal down and takes up the slack which is there. This causes the throw out bearing to ride against the clutch fingers, which presses so ever slightly and causes the clutch to not have as much grip. This causes the clutch friction disk to ...


13

You can do this if your engine RPM, the speed of the vehicle, and the gear you are shifting to/from is just right. The reason you can do this is because you have synchros in the transmission which allows the two gears to match rotational speeds as they come in contact (basically, there is more to it than this, but hopefully you get the drift). The synchros ...


12

It sounds like the clutch is worn out... You can usually tell by gradually applying the gas in the top gear, probably around 2,500 RPM, and the car should accelerate a little bit, but at some point as you press the gas further and further down, you will feel it release and the revolutions will shoot way up without road speed increasing. It basically feels ...


12

Is it ok to give gas while releasing the clutch? Yes, but your goal is to give exactly the right amount of gas. The thing to remember is that the clutch is a consumable part (it's really a whole system of parts that can be consumed but let's pretend that it's a single unique piece for the sake of discussion). As such, it has a finite supply of work ...


9

If you match revs correctly you should be able to change gear with no ill effects at all. The challenge is of course to match revs. This is pretty easy when accelerating, but when decelerating you'll need to use the accelerator to bump the engine revs up to match. Google for heel-and-toe (this also helps make for faster downshifts when using the clutch) ...


9

It sounds like they're trying to take you for a ride to me. I can't see how driving style could cause the slave cylinder to fail - they're separated by a mechanical linkage. I would also dispute that anyone could destroy a clutch with 32k of normal driving - I'd expect it to last at least twice that long. However, a leaking cylinder might cause ...


9

A basic clutch is made up of three major parts: Flywheel Friction disk Pressure plate (NOTE: These three pieces do not actually go together. I'm using the pictures for illustrative purposes.) The flywheel is attached to the back of the engine. The pressure plate is attached to the flywheel. Sandwiched in between the two is the friction disk. ...


9

Heel-Toe shifting and clutchless shifting are 2 different things. I guess they can be done together.... The one thing both of these techniques have in common is rev matching. There is the RPM you are at when you come out of a gear, and the RPM you will be at when you go into the next (or previous) gear. When you rev match, you try and have the engine RPM ...


8

You should be pushing the clutch pedal to start the engine no matter what time of year it is. There is a clutch safety switch which needs to be engaged in order for your ignition to work when you turn the key. It can only be engaged when you press down on the clutch pedal. This is to prevent you from trying to start the car while it's in gear. Just a safety ...


8

I read on a forum that the issue could be down to certain earth wires. When depressing the clutch pedal, you may be earthing a electrical line going to the sound system which in turn stops the music. There are various earths located in the engine bay. Check around the inner wings etc and make sure all of them are tight.


8

Until the engine starts the only thing applying torque to the drive train is the starter motor, the engine itself is not providing any torque. Starting like this will not cause any damage to the drive train (except perhaps the teeth on the edge of the flywheel that the starter motor engages with) but it does put excessive load on the starter motor and it's ...


7

The short answer is probably no, this is not bad. Inconvenient at times but likely just fine. The longer answer requires a little more information: Is the clutch fully disengaged after it's depressed past that 2 inch mark? Or is that just the point at which it really catches? It's possible that the clutch is still slipping at that point, making for a ...


7

With the vehicle stopped, and in a safe place, start out in 4th gear, and slowly release the clutch while giving the engine gas. If the clutch is in good condition, the car should stall - if there's any slipping, you'll probably feel it, and should disengage the clutch right away to prevent further damage. If the car happens to start going without ...


7

How does the pedal feel? Does it have the same resistance as normal, or does it feel really soft, and go straight to the floor? If it it the latter, chances are you have air in the system, or a leak - check the fluid level in the reservoir (which should look similar to the brake one, but usually smaller). If it feels normal, there could still be a small ...


7

Most likely cause is a worn or misadjusted clutch. The clutch disc is slipping meaning that all the engines power is not being transmitted to the transmission. Cost of a clutch replacement is to varied to give an accurate estimate. Clarification Note Energy will always take the path of least resistance. From a clutch's perspective, it is much more ...


7

In general, a clutch is a part which allows to connect / disconnect two shafts also while they are rotating. The most simple clutch consists of to discs, each firmly attached to one shaft. Press them together, and the friction between them allows to transfer torque from the one shaft to the other. Pull them apart, and the shafts aren't connected any more, ...


6

The main difference of DOT3 and DOT4 is boiling point of the fluid. The DOT3 standard has a lower minimum boiling point requirement then DOT4. Not all fluids are made equal and they will all typically list what both their Dry and Wet boiling points are. You can have one DOT3 fluid that just barely makes it past the standard, then another that can handle ...


6

Mechanical clutches have a cable for actuation, and typically need adjusting throughout the life of the clutch. Hydraulically actuated clutches tend to be self-adjusting, as long as there is enough fluid in the reservoir. However, this does mean that hydraulic clutches can be susceptible to air bubbles in the lines, and water in the system which can lead ...


6

Is the clutch cable operated or hydraulic? On hydraulic clutches that's a common symptom of a failing master and/or slave cylinder(s).


6

When was the last time the transmission's gear oil was changed? If it has been a while (or never), get it changed. Check your manual for the recommended interval, this is one of the fluids that is often overlooked. If it has never been done on a 2003, it needs to be done.


6

To replace the clutch technically you only need a new clutch. However most people will purchase a Clutch Kit that will usually contain Clutch Pressure Plate Thrust/ Release Bearing Pilot/Spigot Bearing Alignment Tool The last 2 items are not always included in a clutch kit and they are not always necessary, although an alignment tool does make life a ...


6

Most vehicles with a standard transmission now use a hydraulic clutch. The clutch system consists of a reservoir with master cylinder, some tubing, and a slave cylinder. It works in a similar manner as your brakes. Pushing the pedal forces a fluid into the slave cylinder. The slave cylinder applies a force to the throw out bearing which causes the clutch to ...


6

No significant damage has been done. There are two potential areas that can be damaged by extended driving with the park brake on. The park brake shoes/pads will wear prematurely if the vehicle is driven with the brake engaged. The clutch will also suffer some wear as the brake being on will require slipping/riding the clutch on every start. In your case you ...


6

I don't know about a Mercedes in particular, but that's exactly what happens when a clutch goes bad. There are three main parts to a clutch: pressure plate; friction disk; and flywheel. Each has a specific function: Flywheel - is a rotating mechanical device that is used to store rotational energy. This part is usually attached to the rear of an engine (on ...


6

If the noise is only happening when the clutch is engaged (pedal out), it's not the throw out bearing. You'd only hear the noise when you push on the pedal. This is because the only time the throw out bearing is being used is when you are pushing the pedal down. It won't contact the clutch fingers any other time, and therefor cannot make noise with the ...


6

Starting the engine in Neutral (manual gearbox) without depressing the clutch means the starter will have to get the engine parts moving, but also the main (input) shaft on the gearbox. Cold temperatures affect not only the oil in the engine, but also the lubricant inside the gear box. Thus the starter motor will have to contend with the slightly thicker oil ...


6

A flywheel serves four main purposes (in most vehicles): It provides mass for rotational inertia to keep the engine in motion It is specifically weighted to provide balance for the crankshaft It provides a means to get the engine started (starter ring) It provides a connection for power transfer between the engine and transmission (along with the clutch ...


6

When you are traveling 20-30 mph, shift into high gear (6th IIRC) and push the gas 1/2 to 3/4 of the way down. If you see the RPM rise with no immediate increase in speed, the clutch is worn to the point that it is slipping. The amount of time between slight slippage and total failure is usually not very long. For a higher power car, you can expect to ...


6

To get us on the same footing, I'm going to assume by saying "clutch pressed halfway" you are suggesting the clutch be halfway engaged (meaning, you are still getting power from the engine, but it's not fully engaged). What you are talking about is called slipping the clutch. It is a process whereby you can get the engine within the power/torque band ...



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