Hot answers tagged

18

Holding the clutch in is generally not a good idea. The clutch is designed to be used for very short periods between gears, and for holding in first when you are about to pull away. So if you are wanting to coast you should definitely do it in neutral. The difference between these two from a fuel consumption perspective should be marginal. From a safety ...


18

It absolutely does. It's called riding the clutch. Even though you "believe" you just have your foot there, it forces the pedal down and takes up the slack which is there. This causes the throw out bearing to ride against the clutch fingers, which presses so ever slightly and causes the clutch to not have as much grip. This causes the clutch friction disk to ...


18

If it was just once, I wouldn't be overly worried... particularly as you say the car is driving fine. You took a bit of life off your clutch, and I'd keep an eye out for issues in the coming weeks or months with the clutch just to be on the safe side.


17

Using the clutch engagement to turn the vehicle off can definitely hurt the car. Essentially what you're doing is wearing the clutch, bearings that lie within the motor, rings and valve seals. If you can visualize the physics and mechanics of what you're doing, it makes sense. When you let your foot off of the clutch pedal, you're pressing the friction disk ...


16

Is it ok to give gas while releasing the clutch? Yes, but your goal is to give exactly the right amount of gas. The thing to remember is that the clutch is a consumable part (it's really a whole system of parts that can be consumed but let's pretend that it's a single unique piece for the sake of discussion). As such, it has a finite supply of work that ...


15

It sounds like the clutch is worn out... You can usually tell by gradually applying the gas in the top gear, probably around 2,500 RPM, and the car should accelerate a little bit, but at some point as you press the gas further and further down, you will feel it release and the revolutions will shoot way up without road speed increasing. It basically feels ...


13

You can do this if your engine RPM, the speed of the vehicle, and the gear you are shifting to/from is just right. The reason you can do this is because you have synchros in the transmission which allows the two gears to match rotational speeds as they come in contact (basically, there is more to it than this, but hopefully you get the drift). The synchros ...


13

A flywheel serves four main purposes (in most vehicles): It provides mass for rotational inertia to keep the engine in motion It is specifically weighted to provide balance for the crankshaft It provides a means to get the engine started (starter ring) It provides a connection for power transfer between the engine and transmission (along with the clutch ...


13

Heel-Toe shifting and clutchless shifting are 2 different things. I guess they can be done together.... The one thing both of these techniques have in common is rev matching. There is the RPM you are at when you come out of a gear, and the RPM you will be at when you go into the next (or previous) gear. When you rev match, you try and have the engine RPM ...


12

why using your clutch during braking can be considered unsafe I have ridden motorcycles for years. Engine braking is a component of safe riding. The engine itself can be ok and not receive any damage from pulling in the clutch while breaking other than it is additional wear on throw out bearing for the pressure plate within the clutch. The throwout ...


11

Newtons Third Law For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. The statement means that in every interaction, there is a pair of forces acting on the two interacting objects. The size of the forces on the first object equals the size of the force on the second object. The lateral center of gravity (CG) is above the axle as well. So you have ...


10

Absolutely not. There's no issue here. The engine/transmission were not coupled. There was no stress on the transmission. It just was running backwards from what it usually would. Really, it's no big deal.


9

If you match revs correctly you should be able to change gear with no ill effects at all. The challenge is of course to match revs. This is pretty easy when accelerating, but when decelerating you'll need to use the accelerator to bump the engine revs up to match. Google for heel-and-toe (this also helps make for faster downshifts when using the clutch) ...


9

It sounds like they're trying to take you for a ride to me. I can't see how driving style could cause the slave cylinder to fail - they're separated by a mechanical linkage. I would also dispute that anyone could destroy a clutch with 32k of normal driving - I'd expect it to last at least twice that long. However, a leaking cylinder might cause ...


9

You should be pushing the clutch pedal to start the engine no matter what time of year it is. There is a clutch safety switch which needs to be engaged in order for your ignition to work when you turn the key. It can only be engaged when you press down on the clutch pedal. This is to prevent you from trying to start the car while it's in gear. Just a safety ...


9

A basic clutch is made up of three major parts: Flywheel Friction disk Pressure plate (NOTE: These three pieces do not actually go together. I'm using the pictures for illustrative purposes.) The flywheel is attached to the back of the engine. The pressure plate is attached to the flywheel. Sandwiched in between the two is the friction disk. ...


9

Until the engine starts the only thing applying torque to the drive train is the starter motor, the engine itself is not providing any torque. Starting like this will not cause any damage to the drive train (except perhaps the teeth on the edge of the flywheel that the starter motor engages with) but it does put excessive load on the starter motor and it's ...


9

This is addition to Paulster's answer. Here's an animation The disc in Grey is the flywheel Wikipedia provides a good general outline - A flywheel is a rotating mechanical device that is used to store rotational energy. ... - Providing continuous energy when the energy source is discontinuous. For example, flywheels are used in reciprocating ...


9

In general, a clutch is a part which allows to connect / disconnect two shafts also while they are rotating. The most simple clutch consists of to discs, each firmly attached to one shaft. Press them together, and the friction between them allows to transfer torque from the one shaft to the other. Pull them apart, and the shafts aren't connected any more, ...


8

Reading around a bit on the dual mass clutch the friction plate between the two masses is the component that will often wear out as it is designed to keep from too much torque being sent through to the transmission, taking the hit itself instead (choice between burning up a couple hundred dollar flywheel or a transmission in the thousands of dollars). ...


8

How does the pedal feel? Does it have the same resistance as normal, or does it feel really soft, and go straight to the floor? If it it the latter, chances are you have air in the system, or a leak - check the fluid level in the reservoir (which should look similar to the brake one, but usually smaller). If it feels normal, there could still be a small ...


8

When was the last time the transmission's gear oil was changed? If it has been a while (or never), get it changed. Check your manual for the recommended interval, this is one of the fluids that is often overlooked. If it has never been done on a 2003, it needs to be done.


8

My choice would depend on the duration of the stop. If you're rolling up to an intersection and see the light change to red knowing you will sit for a full cycle I'd opt for "in neutral foot off the clutch". Pulling up to an already red light I would go for "in gear clutch depressed" as you can figure you'll have a short wait. Having the clutch depressed ...


8

The most likely cause is a worn or misadjusted clutch. The clutch disc is slipping meaning that all the engine's power is not being transmitted to the transmission. The cost of a clutch replacement is too varied to give an accurate estimate. Clarification Note Energy will always take the path of least resistance. From a clutch's perspective, it is much ...


8

I read on a forum that the issue could be down to certain earth wires. When depressing the clutch pedal, you may be earthing a electrical line going to the sound system which in turn stops the music. There are various earths located in the engine bay. Check around the inner wings etc and make sure all of them are tight.


8

When you are traveling 20-30 mph, shift into high gear (6th IIRC) and push the gas 1/2 to 3/4 of the way down. If you see the RPM rise with no immediate increase in speed, the clutch is worn to the point that it is slipping. The amount of time between slight slippage and total failure is usually not very long. For a higher power car, you can expect to ...


7

The short answer is probably no, this is not bad. Inconvenient at times but likely just fine. The longer answer requires a little more information: Is the clutch fully disengaged after it's depressed past that 2 inch mark? Or is that just the point at which it really catches? It's possible that the clutch is still slipping at that point, making for a ...


7

With the vehicle stopped, and in a safe place, start out in 4th gear, and slowly release the clutch while giving the engine gas. If the clutch is in good condition, the car should stall - if there's any slipping, you'll probably feel it, and should disengage the clutch right away to prevent further damage. If the car happens to start going without stalling,...


7

I don't know about a Mercedes in particular, but that's exactly what happens when a clutch goes bad. There are three main parts to a clutch: pressure plate; friction disk; and flywheel. Each has a specific function: Flywheel - is a rotating mechanical device that is used to store rotational energy. This part is usually attached to the rear of an engine (on ...


7

No. The gearbox does not get worn if the clutch pedal is fully depressed. Actually, if the gearbox could get worn depending on the position of the clutch pedal, it would get worn when the engine is connected to the gearbox, i.e. when the clutch pedal is not pressed. Then some parts of the gearbox are rotating. However, when you are stopped and the clutch is ...



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