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2

The simple fact is that there are tons of ways for cars to get oil on the engine rather than in the engine. There is engine oil, AC compressor oil, and power steering fluid. Over time, most engines will have some kind of leak. Maybe its a small leak from the head cover gasket or even a cracked PCV valve. It could also be spilled when filling the oil. ...


1

I'm going to be potentially controversial here and say yes. The reason people say never to use washing up liquid is because it strips all of the waxes from the car. If you intend to subsequently apply wax, there is an argument to say that this is actually the best soap to use. I've personally used washing up liquid followed by a thorough rinse and chamois ...


8

Simply speaking, a colored plastic powder is applied to the parts with an airgun. The parts are then heated until the powder melts and forms a smooth (up to high glossy) surface. Once cooled down, you have a nice, hard coating. The powder may also be a thermosetting polymer, i.e. it does not only melt above a certain temperature, but also cures. When ...


13

Believe it or not, that is corrosion. You are correct in your assumption that the Valve Cover is certainly cast aluminum. Aluminum can be damaged by many de-greasers that are too aggressive. This happens due to a chemical reaction by the cleaner with aluminum parts. Steel or painted parts will not have this oxidation occur. Usually you can avoid this by ...


3

Safe and Cheap? Wow, you aren't asking for much. This question got me looking at different Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) and I was surprised nothing is safe anymore, sigh. Here's the MSDS sheet for Procter and Gamble laundry soap for goodness sake. Here's a random purple degreaser. My guess is that nothing that will cut oil residue is totally ...


4

This isn't answering your question but may answer your need (removing stubborn engine grime). Soften the grime by rubbing engine oil into it. The engine oil doesn't have to be new; used oil works just as well. Once the grime is softened, it becomes much easier to pull it off with a less intense solvent like brake cleaner.


7

You will generally want to look for something that is a solvent, or is solvent-based. A good homebrew 'degreaser' would be using washing soda (sodium carbonate) diluted in water. You can make washing soda from baking soda by heating it (baking soda) up on a stove. There are plenty of videos and guides on how to safely to this. But in terms of effectivity, ...


1

To be honest, I wouldn't bother. I picked up some excellent purple degreaser at the local dollar store for (I seem to recall) $1.



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