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14

This is analagous to down shifting in a manual. This is a lower gear for the transmission which means the engine revolves at a higher rate producing more back pressure at the same speed as a higher gear. When going down a hill, if you downshift that will reduce the demands on the braking system, due to the back pressure. You will often see truck drivers ...


13

In addition to what Patrick said, D3, or whatever else it's called in various makes and models, is also useful for those times when you're climbing a hill and the transmission keeps shifting back and forth between gears. There may also be times, such as when driving on very slippery surfaces, when a gear shift could cause the car to lose traction. In such a ...


7

There really isn't an indicator for belts, unfortunately. If the boyfriend of the previous owner says the dealer changed it, bring the car to that dealer, if possible, and have them look up a service record. If you're far away from the dealer, call in and have your VIN handy. I'd say this is your best bet.


7

Check the other end of the wires to make sure you did not loosen them. Your wires could be going bad and moving them around made the problem worse. Would not hurt to replace them as well. Also it could just be a coincident with the spark plugs, it could be a fuel issue or a problem with your distributor. Although, this is less likely than the first two ...


7

Upon the regular engine starting key turn area the dash lights dim and there maybe a single 'tch sound or no sound at all coming from the engine block. Sadly, I know this sound well. This sounds like a dead battery. Here are the steps that I would suggest: Charge the battery with a plug-in battery charger. They aren't terribly expensive to ...


7

You don't weigh them against each other. Items are generally inspect or replace at x miles or y period of time, whichever comes first. This is what you need to do to keep the car within factory tolerances. Go outside of that range and you become a "test driver", which may not be an issue, but it could be for certain parts...


7

Mostly replacement is preventative maintenance. Eventually they'll get cracks that moisture can get into, etc. If they test good, they're probably fine for the moment, however, at their age they could develop problems any time. On my '91 Toyota, I've been through several sets now, and have to say that in my case, OEM is the best. I've tried other brands ...


6

As they are made of rubber, belts begin to perish over time, and this weakens them. The constant flexing as the engine turns accelerates this weakening process. Eventually (if it weren't replaced), the rubber would split and the belt would snap - causing very expensive damage to your engine... It is quite easy to visually observe a belt that definitely ...


6

Depends on who you ask. Any tire shop will say yes, it affects handling and braking. And it will. But to what degree? Not much. If the tread life of all the tires are similar, the ratings similar, etc. you can reduce this. Still, the different tread patterns will cause different handling. In the rain perhaps one tire will be less effective than the others ...


6

Although automated manuals are becoming more popular, the 2012 Civic (from my 2 seconds of searching) appears to be a normal automatic. Even still, I'm guessing your vehicle may have the sensors and programming necessary to determine that it's descending an incline and is employing engine braking to help you slow down. What it sounds like it's doing is ...


6

You have the D16A6 engine. From searching various forums it seems that is an interference design. However, while valve damage is possible (probable?), it may not be certain. There do seem to be reports of timing belt breaks without valve damage. Then again, there are reports of bent valves, too (though that is a later 1.7L version of your engine). A break at ...


5

Normally strut failure makes it to where they are ineffective in dampening the movement of the vehicle on the springs. This wouldn't cause a "rough" ride but in fact the opposite making it very soft and wavy. Where you'd hit a bump and the car would bounce multiple times as it settles back down on the springs. The strut reduces that movement allowing the ...


5

I would say that it is most likely a balancing issue. In order to find out, I would: Use the car's jack to clear each front wheel from the ground. Give the wheel a spin and check to see that the spinning tire does not vibrate (sideways and/or up-and-down). This could indicate a damaged rim or a damaged tire. If pt. 1 does not give any indication, unmount ...


5

The 30k service, as performed by a Honda Dealer, would consist of the following things: First and foremost a basic oil change service. This includes oil and filter, adjustment of tire pressures, and an inspection of the underside of the vehicle(suspension and steering, exhaust, etc), the topping off of any fluids, and a check of all front and rear lights. ...


5

Usually the glass is bonded on to the reflector unit, so you probably won't be able to buy the glass on its own - You'll have to buy a complete unit. Your best bet is to ask around any scrapyards/junkyards in your area, see if they have any Civics in stock, as that would be considerably cheaper than a new unit from Honda. A decent workshop manual should ...


5

The "fun" part is going to be getting the original bushing out - you might have to cut or burn out the rubber, then cut through the outer metal ring without damaging the arm. You'll also need to build a makeshift tool you can use to press in the new bushing - at the very least, use a socket that matches the out diameter of the bushing and use a vise to ...


5

It was indeed the catalytic converter (the EX does not have a pre-cat). After replacing it, the downstream sensor graph spends most of its time above 0.5 V, as it should if the converter is working. Update: I started getting this error code again, a little over a year after replacing the cat. I also finally found a guide on how to read these graphs, from ...


5

A lot of this depends on where and how you are driving - for normal street driving I wouldn't be too worried. There'll be a slight grip imbalance at the back which might affect braking slightly (but keep in mind that the front wheels are contributing about 70% to the overall braking effort) and there's going to be a slight difference in grip between either ...


5

No, I don't think you fried anything. All that's happening is that the electrical system can't supply enough current to power the starter motor, so the voltage drops when it tries to. The "clicking" sound is the starter solenoid. When the voltage drops from trying to operate the motor, the solenoid (big relay) no longer has sufficient power to keep it ...


5

It actually sounds like a fuel supply issue to me. My Eclipse (most likely due to the a difference in the replacement fuel pressure regulator that was installed after the original one failed) isn't able to hold fuel pressure in the rail when off for more than a few hours. So, those "cold" starts all take more cranking and it usually has the same half ...


5

Aftermarket, check your local parts store. It looks like A1 Cardone makes one. You will have to check your local parts store. You will also need the OEM number from the original computer. A1 Cardone You can also check local junk yards. It's normal for dealers not to carry parts for cars that old, some parts are disconinuied from the manufacture as ...


5

I would think the alternator is the culprit, You can take your car down to an Advance Auto Parts, O'Reilly, Autozone (or the like) where they will test it for free. They can also check your battery, which may be the culprit, but I doubt it. It sounds like the internal regulator is going out (or you might have lost one or more diodes) on the alternator. ...


5

Because the coolant stops circulating when the engine is turned off, the engine actually keeps getting hotter for a while after the engine has been turned off. If the engine gets hot enough (above 112 degrees Celsius/ 230 Fahrenheit) the aluminium cylinder head can start warping, causing uneven pressure on your head gasket, causing it to blow the next time ...


4

Double check that the lugs are tight. If the lugs aren't tightened enough, the wheel might have a slight amount of slop and will vibrate. Obviously this is a very dangerous situation.


4

Whenever you have a cranks won't run condition the first step is to see what's missing, fuel or fire. First pull a spark plug wire off, stick a thin screwdriver in the end of the wire where the spark plug goes. Hold the side of the screwdriver about 1/4 inch away from a metal part of the engine, while holding onto the handle (insulating yourself from the ...


4

It looks like the entire instrument cluster is intermittently losing power. Loose wiring, particularly bad ground wire(s) should be your first suspect. Find the wiring harness(es) that plug into the back of the cluster and check that they are secure. Follow them around behind the dashboard to see if anything else is loose. You may find a ground wire for the ...


4

As already stated, get the estimate on paper with parts and labor broken down. Go to another shop and get an estimate, tell them reasons related to your car of why you want the estimate, not "i have this estimate, can you do better". If you've noticed vibration under heavy braking, noises or just reached the number of miles where you want them checked for ...


4

If the dash lights dim and the starter doesn't turn, it's usually either the battery going bad or the starter that's at fault. I'd check the battery voltage both without any consumers and with someone trying to operate the starter motor and would expect at least 12.8V (no load) and about 10V (trying to start), otherwise the battery is dead. If the battery ...


4

The way I look at it you are paying $500 for 18 more months of warranty. If the parts he doesn't replace are damaged they won't make it 2 years. When you rebuild a transmission you don't replace all the parts, just the parts that are needed. If it makes it 2 years it didn't need to be replaced, if it doesn't it's his problem. I would go with the rebuilt ...


4

Your most expensive problem is that a V-tec motor is designed to operate at higher RPM's than your motor can handle. This would mean that you'd have to get stronger pistons and connecting rods (or conrods as they're referred to). You'd also need to upgrade your valve springs to cope with the higher RPM and you might also have to get a new camshaft. All in ...



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