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4

Bad coils are just one of many things that could be to blame. I'd say stop changing coils. It is highly unlikely that they were the root cause of the problem to begin with. The symptoms provided are consistent with a misfiring engine. This usually means that there is an issue with the mixture of air and fuel reaching the engine (more on that in a bit). So ...


-1

Ck the crank sensor,and the o2 sensor


1

Try to push the door closed and pull the latch to see if that open it. Sometimes if you over stuff the compartment it will close and be pushed so tightly against the door it cannot unlatch. By pushing on the door you are relieving pressure and allowing the latch to open.


0

If the AC compressor isn't kicking on, the pressure inside of your AC system is equalized throughout the system. This would allow for your gauge to appear in the "red zone" even though the compressor hasn't kicked in. My thinking is, your system pressure has fallen just below the threshold where the compressor will kick in. You can try and jump the system ...


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Seafoam works but can cause strong for small gas engine. i have had better luck with Reslin chemical products but my favorite is the two liquids that are combined into one and says repair in a bottle, if first treatment doesn't work try a second treatment. Best results for me so far...


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After days of research on this exact topic I think I have an answer to fix our problem. To fix your problem I would first change the ignition coil and ignition control module. Both are next to each other and are attached to a small metal bracket bolted to the top of the motor just to the passengers side of the air intake/ throttle body. P.S. From the ECM ...


2

I think your idea you are having a major carbon buildup is a good theory. You can try and get rid of the carbon by doing a Seafoam treatment. You mentioned are in the process of running a bottle of Techron through it. While this will help if you are using it all the time, it won't do much for a huge carbon buildup. Also, I believe you have carbon buildup in ...


0

If the heads are 243's and are stock on a 6.0L engine, you are looking at an LS2. The 243's also came on LS6 engines, but are 5.7L engines. If you are actually wondering which engine came out of the Avalanche and it has 243 heads, you are looking at a 5.3L with some other than stock heads. They didn't install the 243 heads on the truck engines. You ...


1

I removed the top hose (engine to canister) and drove. I still experienced the run-on, so I believe this conclusively rules out the canister as the cause of the dieseling. I also found that the connection of this top hose to the metal tubing was very loose and possibly the cause of the gasoline smell. I put a hose clamp here to eliminate this. As far as ...


0

It could just be you got a bad alternator from O'Reilly's. Have them replace the unit for free. With re-manufactured parts, it happens. Have then test the new unit in the store before you leave to ensure you don't have to do it again.


4

It sounds to me like the previous owner suspected an outer CV joint (which was my first thought when you described the problem) and changing it didn't fix the issue. I would double check that the outer CV joints look new and there is a good chance the problem could relate to one of the inner CV joints. Diagnosing the problem will likely be a case of ...


0

I may be missing something, since I'd expect someone would have mentioned this. But, just in case: the standard answer to (I think) the same question on 'Car Talk' was always that the drain hose from evaporator pan was plugged.


0

You can use a lubricant to penetrate the bolt. Some ones that work well are WD-40, Liquid Wrench or PB Blaster, all of which can be found in most hardware stores. If you can get one of those and a hollow metal pipe to get more leverage on the breaker bar, it should do the trick. Be careful when you're down there as it could get real messy once you get it ...


5

Referring to this website: If all is well and there is no slack in the timing chain then you will see about three to five degrees of "reverse motion" before the distributor begins to turn. To measure this, do the following: Get a socket which fits the front balancer crank shaft bolt. Get a breaker bar which is long enough to turn the crank using it. ...


0

The following two items are the exact replacement for various year/make/models of GM vehicles with a 4.3 L engine, including my 1995 Blazer (vin W with PCM)... Spectra Premium model #GM23 "new" distributor Cardone model 84-1635 "new" distributor What is an acceptable amount of up/down play in a distributor shaft? I contact both Spectra Premium and ...


1

I had the same problem with my 2004 chevrolet malibu classic. I replaced the oxygen sensor, crank sensor, fuel pump, and thermostat. Come to find out, it was my computer module. If your check engine light do not come on and you continue to have a "no start" problem, it may be your computer module.


2

One thing that I certainly wouldn't rule out is the CPI Spider Fuel Injector Assembly. Do you know if or when this was last replaced? Getting to 216,000 on the original injector spider would make me very suspicious it's the culprit. A clogged or faulty spider could also explain random misfires, and running too lean. These engines are notorious for these ...


3

(EDIT NOTE: I made a bad assumption about the HEI distributor, so deleted all of that nonsense. Please do the following to see if it is an issue, though.) Please check the following: Take the distributor cap off so you can observe the rotor Put a socket on the crank shaft snout bolt (where the main crank pulley is at) Turn the crank clockwise until you ...


1

Yes, you can remove it. Not knowing which engine you have in your vehicle, it's hard to tell you exactly what you'll need. Some engines, depending on the AC placement, will just require a shorter belt. Others will need a separate idler pulley which you put in place of the AC compressor. All it does it takes up the slack. Conversely, if you aren't too ...


0

My '06 Silverado does something similar, though I don't have any gas which comes back out at me if I try again. Simply what I do to avoid having the gas filler nozzle not click off on me is to rotate the nozzle about 45° counter-clockwise, so the nozzle and filler hose are at about the 10 to 4 o'clock orientation. (NOTE: Please forgive my crude ...


1

I'd suspect some kind of blockage or restriction in the filler - possibly the hose itself has partially collapsed, or the non-return valve is stuck, stopping the fuel from running down into the tank properly - by the time you got to the second service station, the fuel had worked it's way past the obstruction into the tank, so you could do it again.


2

My first suggestion was going to be the wheel bearing. It still might be one of the rear bearings. I had this problem with my '06 Pontiac and the wheel hub (including bearing) was surprisingly cheap and easy to replace. You should be able to inspect the rear bearings much the same way as the front bearings. My second suggestion would be the CV joints. The ...



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