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Not sure on your particular vehicle, but most auto-adjusting drum brakes work when applying the foot brake (not parking brake) while the vehicle is in reverse, so whenever you back out of a parking space and hit the foot brake, the brakes adjust. EDIT: There is a device within the braking assembly which looks like this: There is a lever arm attached to ...


1

If you have fluid in the brake reservoir, and have no pedal, you have a failed master cylinder. The piston that moves when you step on the brake pedal has o-ring seals that if they fail, can allow fluid to pass by them and not apply pressure to the brakes. All brake systems today have a dual circuit system where if you loss pressure to a wheel (caliper, ...


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If your brake pedal went to the floor it means that there was not enough hydraulic pressure to apply the brake. If they were working fine before and never felt squishy then your master cylinder has probably gone out and needs to be replaced. Alternatively you may have a lot of air in the lines, enough that the pressure applied by the brake was not enough to ...


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You need to bleed the brakes, you will have an air pocket in the system. As you stand on the pedal, the system is compressing the air pocket instead of the fluid, hence the brakes won't actuate. Here's a popular mechanics article on how you can do this yourself, or you can take it to a mechanic and they can do it pretty quickly and cheaply for you. This ...


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Goodness, this could be just about anything. What setting is the heater, ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) set at? I'd expect this as normal if the A/C compressor is engaged (which it is in normal A/C modes, plus defrost and defog modes...) I wouldn't necessarily expect fuel related issues with this description, but it would be nice to see if there ...


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My suggestion is to check the fuse first...it's fuse #14 for low beams. If it "pops" out then you will have no low beams. Same for high beams. The two have two different fuses.


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There are two places this could be: ICM or Optispark. The intermittent nature of it leads me to believe it is ignition related. On your year of LT1, ignition issues can pretty much be boiled down to these two things (as you are describing). Just because you've replaced the ICM, does not mean it isn't at fault. Usually the way the engine dies with an ICM ...


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Since the fuel pressure is good you may also want to check for a vacuum leak. Sometimes a vacuum leak can cause intermittent problems such as this because it may be partially sealed at times. I would carefully check all of the vacuum hoses and the intake boot for cracks or holes.


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I have a 97 suburban. I am not sure how similar things are. I have replaced lines/hoses/calipers/wheel cylinders on this truck and spent hours of time and over a gallon of fluid trying to get it bled correctly. A couple things that I've learned and have helped. If the master ran dry, be sure to bench bleed the master and ABS. Remove the lines, install ...


7

If you've changed the calipers and the pedal now goes all the way to the floor, chances are that you've introduced air into the system whilst you had the calipers off. To fix this, you need to "bleed" the braking system. At each brake caliper / wheel cylinder there is a bleed nipple or bleed screw. The basic procedure is to start at the wheel furthest ...


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Well, @paulster2 gets it right again. 2 bad calipers in a row. Got a different caliper from another parts store and put it on and it is working great today. My ultimate diagnostic test in determining that it had to be a faulty caliper was this: Once I drove the truck around and got the brake nice and tight, I jacked it up, pulled the wheel off, and opened ...


1

Brown fluid is common in higher mileage automatic transmissions, especially if they do not get regular fluid changes. Red ATF turns brown when it is worn out and the clutches in the transmission start slipping, creating friction and burning the fluid, turning it from red to brown. I don't think it is anyone's fault, its just time for a transmission ...


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So you've replace a bunch of coolant related components and you want to know if anything leaks? You can borrow a coolant pressure tester from you local autoparts store in many locations (leave a deposit). You will place the tester on the fill cap (no matter where it is), pump up the pressure and then note the pressure on the gauge. Give it a few hours, ...


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The head unit will supply enough power to the stock speakers. You will not need to amplify the signal. Doing so will likely blow the speakers. If you replace your stock speakers with higher wattage speakers, you may need an amp with the channels to power these. A one or two channel (bridgeable) amp is sufficient for the subwoofer(s). When I had a system, ...


3

Number 1 looks like your intake manifold and number 2 is your intake hose leading to the throttle body. If 2-3 ounces of oil come out of #1 when #2 is removed, that's ok. It's most likely oil that's been pushed up by the PCV (Positive Crankcase Ventilation) hose. (Your motor doesn't have a PCV valve, just the hose with a filter on it. Ahhh, Chevy...). If ...


4

1989 is OBD1, my favorite scanner for this vintage GM product is a Snap-On MT2500, you can find them on eBay fairly reasonable. Be sure the scanner comes with the GM1 aldl adapter, a Primary cartridge and a Troubleshooter cartridge and cables for your model year. You can short the proper pins (image below) to get the check engine light to flash any codes ...


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89 is OBD1 and requires specific connectors and a OBD1 scantool. You can jump pins A & B on the ALDL (Assembly Line Datalink Connector located under the driver side dash) to make the MIL flash out codes.


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There are scanners that will talk to OBD1 computers, but most shops (I would guess) don't have the equipment anymore. I got rid of my OBD1 equipment last year. I've seen ≤ 2 cars that required me to use it in the past 4 years. Maybe a GM dealer would still have the equipment. You would have to call around and ask. By jumping pin A to pin B on the ALDL ...


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I have seen this behavior with a bad ehcu but is rare, they have an internal valve for each wheel, but it does happen. Internal collapsed brake hose I have seen many times, also sticking calipers use to be common but I hardly see that anymore since they went back to steel pistons. Steel piston calipers can do this but requires a lot of internal corrosion on ...



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