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11

These 2005 Chevy Malibu Complaints are extremely common in this make and model vehicle. According to Car Complaints, this was a design flaw in the vehicle that caused the bulbs to burn so hot that they burned out the lights and melted the turn signal covers. The gaps introduced by the warped light covers have led to electrical system horror stories about ...


11

If you lost all (or almost all) of your brake fluid, you have a leak. Check all of your calipers (assuming disk brakes all around) to see if there is a leak at the wheels. If none there, check the soft lines (rubber lines at the wheel) for leaks. If no leaks there, check around the master cylinder and anti-lock brake unit for leaks from the lines. If you do ...


9

Here it the procedure for 're-learning' the master key for my Chevy Malibu. I assume that most Chevy's that have a transponder work this way well: With an unlearned master vehicle key, turn ON the ignition, but not the engine: Wait for roughly 10 minutes (mine was slightly longer) for the 'security indicator' to turn off: Turn the ignition completely ...


7

I called a local Chevy dealership's service department out of curiosity. The technician I spoke to said that there is no way to access the car settings, that are available through the stock stereo, if the unit is replaced. He mentioned the factory integration adapter that you linked to. He said that it doesn't do anything to access those settings and that ...


6

I don't know that car specifically, but it sounds like the auto-cancel mechanism is bent or mis-installed. Since it is integral with the steering column, you will probably need to pull off your steering wheel and get into where the switch mates with the column. There will be a plate or ring on the column with a tab or the like that will move a lever in the ...


6

Three things I can think of: Do you have another key to try? May just not like the key you are trying. Is the steering wheel cocked at all, where there may be causing pressure on the key lock? Try giggling the steering column as you are trying to turn the key (assume you might have tried this, but don't know). Your locking mechanism may be frozen. You ...


6

Yes, it will. However, your biggest concern is going to be getting enough air flowing over it. Do yourself a favour and go look at the engine bay of a 200x model Subary Impreza WRX. The intercooler is mounted flat on the top of the engine and the characteristic scoop forces air onto it to cool the intake air. The same type of thing might work for your ...


6

As R.. says, the remaining softness will be down to air in the lines - this can be fixed by properly bleeding the system. Before you do that, however, you need to establish the cause of the loss - until you do so, the car should be regarded as dangerous and must not be used. If you're in any doubt, take it to a professional. The most likely cause of a ...


5

I got that exact same product! The hose didn't work very well. I ended up buying a separate hose for $15 or so, with brass fittings. Also, as Patrick said, a large amount of refrigerant solves a large refrigerant leak. And it won't solve it for long. So, I recommend either Go to the shop and get a leak test, and a refill if it's slow. Buy a quality hose ...


5

Yes, that is the sway bar. There are usually just a couple of bushings (one per side) that attach it to the frame and then however they connect it to the suspension. Shouldn't be hard to replace at all, though monkeying it around to get it in and out may be interesting.


5

Does it make the most sense to replace an old car's entire exhaust system all at once? Considering your car is almost 10 years old, having to replace all of the parts in the exhaust system does not sound unreasonable, especially if your locality uses any type of road solvent during the winter months (they didn't in Montana where I'm from originally, ...


5

This is a 1967 Camaro which Chip Foose rebuilt on an episode of Overhaulin'. The sign in the background is the clue. EDIT: I guess I could tell you how to tell this is a '67 with or without knowing Chip Foose did this build :-) If you know anything about Camaros, you can tell this is a 1st gen by its angular cuts. The 2nd gens are not angular and are a lot ...


4

My immediate thought there was the flasher relay. Pull this out and either test it outside the car or swap it for a known-good one. If that is not the fault, then as you rightly point out, you need to make sense of the wiring diagram... The key thing here is the wire colours. Most cars have two-colour wiring, with a main colour and a trace colour (i.e. the ...


4

The Chevy Impala's 4T65E transmission was said to feature an updated Pressure Control Solenoid starting in 2003. This was a major issue in the 2000-2002 model years. But, there are still many people with the 2003MY vehicles that are experiencing the same issue as you. The vehicle may or may not already have illuminated a Check Engine Light due to the issue. ...


4

You may be experiencing torque steer. Since you have Front Wheel Drive (FWD) your drive wheels and your steering wheels are the same. Sometimes under load if traction is uneven (such as in a corner your car is shifting its weight to one side and so will have more traction on the left or right tires) the power being sent to the wheels can become uneven, ...


4

This product solves one main problem(symptom), low freon. The issue with this is that most cases of a car that have low freon is caused by a leak somewhere in the system. If your car suddenly stopped blowing cold air, then this will most likely not fix your problem. Your problem is probably one of two things: A/C Compressor died Large freon leak I ...


4

If you can find it the factory service manual is best way to go. It will cost you a little more but it is much more detailed. http://www.helminc.com is where I have bought several.


4

Both the other answers cover bleeding well, however if you didn't open the hydraulic system (other than the master cylinder cap) then I doubt it's air in the line. My answer assumes a couple of things, you replaced the front pads and you did not turn (resurface) the rotors. During normal brake operation the rotors don't wear evenly, they may be thinner on ...


4

The first thing to check are the grounds anytime you have seemingly unrelated systems not working, working sporadically, or as I like to call it, any time you have gremlins running around in the electrical system. Looking at the ground distribution for G202 pictured below you can see that Instrument panel cluster, and the daytime running lamp module share ...


4

Can you disconnect the battery without upsetting the car's electrics? (You should be able to on a car of that age, but some newer cars or cars with fancy alarms can get upset) If so, remove one terminal and connect the multimeter, set to ammeter mode, in series with it. DO NOT attempt to start the car like this (best to leave the keys well clear of the ...


4

If the engine is a non-interference design, you're fine. If it's an interference design, you've probably got engine damage from the valves being open at the wrong time and being struck by the pistons. To find out which type you have, you need to figure out which engine you have. Search for 'gm VIN decoder' and enter your VIN. Once you know the specific ...


4

If it was never converted to use R134a instead of R12, you're not just going to be able to charge it up yourself, since something that old probably came from the factory with R12 refrigerant. You need a license to buy R12 in the United States, and it's not cheap. Since your system is compromised and needs attention anyway, you might as well do the R134a ...


4

there is typically a casting number on the block. It is located just to the rear of the drivers side cylinder head. Don't confuse this with the serial number pad that is located on the front of the block in front of the passenger side cylinder head. This site has some good photos showing both locations.


4

Find the location of your heater valve, and see what the temperatures are like on both sides. Might just need a new heater valve, which allows coolant to flow to heater.


4

Rest assured that gas pumps don't use magic to stop. When gasoline reaches the top of your tank all the way to the end of the pump nozzle, it covers a valve within the pump nozzel that shuts off the pump mechanically. So in all likelihood, gasoline has filled your tank by the time it trips the pump. The chances that both the gas stations you visited have ...


4

It does depend on the car. As Hillsons says, it might be a faulty gauge or sender, but it might also be the nature of the filler neck, as some designs don't flow well, resulting in the neck filling with fuel before the tank has - I had a car recently where you had to fill it at half-speed otherwise the pump would be constantly clicking off. Others I've seen ...


4

I have had this problem with one of my vehicles as well. It usually has to do with the fillhose vent tube/breather tube being blocked or not working properly. This inhibits air pressure from being released from the tank as you are filling it. This will cause air to travel backwards through the fill tube and cause the pump to shut off as it senses fuel ...


4

You most likely have air in the system, I had the same issue with my 99 Blazer. It seemed as no matter how much I bled it it I couldn't get rid of it. Raise the front of the vehicle make sure that the right side is a bit higher than the left. This will ensure that the highest point in the system is the radiator cap. Remove the radiator cap and start the ...


4

Definitely just insufficient current to run the starter motor. What happens (causing the flashing/clicking) is that when you turn the key, the starter relay/solenoid switches on, and the starter motor pulls all the available current, dropping the battery voltage extremely low. It can no longer power the relay, so the relay springs back and the load (starter ...


4

Single digit temperatures would not freeze your coolant assuming it has antifreeze mixed in appropriately and isn't just water. Since you went from 250 to 150 within seconds I would assume something was blocking the flow of fluid. Thermostat staying shut would be the most likely culprit. It could be that the cold weather is pushing a failing thermostat ...



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