Hot answers tagged

11

These 2005 Chevy Malibu Complaints are extremely common in this make and model vehicle. According to Car Complaints, this was a design flaw in the vehicle that caused the bulbs to burn so hot that they burned out the lights and melted the turn signal covers. The gaps introduced by the warped light covers have led to electrical system horror stories about ...


11

If you lost all (or almost all) of your brake fluid, you have a leak. Check all of your calipers (assuming disk brakes all around) to see if there is a leak at the wheels. If none there, check the soft lines (rubber lines at the wheel) for leaks. If no leaks there, check around the master cylinder and anti-lock brake unit for leaks from the lines. If you do ...


10

Normal Sounds The sound you are hearing is the ABS releasing pressure within the system to allow the wheels to continue to rotate and not lock up when you apply the brakes in low friction conditions. As the snow builds up and you encounter low friction driving conditions due to snow and ice the ABS will kick in more frequently because you are encountering ...


9

Here it the procedure for 're-learning' the master key for my Chevy Malibu. I assume that most Chevy's that have a transponder work this way well: With an unlearned master vehicle key, turn ON the ignition, but not the engine: Wait for roughly 10 minutes (mine was slightly longer) for the 'security indicator' to turn off: Turn the ignition completely ...


9

My top suspect would be a radiator fan that isn't running when it should. The fans assist in transferring heat from the radiator to the surrounding air, and are most needed when the car is stationary. This doesn't mean that the fan is bad. It could be that the relay is malfunctioning or there is a break in the wiring somewhere, so I would try to rule those ...


9

While disconnecting the fuel pump relay and running the engine will work, there are other alternatives. If you can access the Schräder valve, depress it to release the pressurized fuel before disconnecting the fuel lines. This will have the effect of reducing fuel line pressure. It helps to have the vehicle cool down and not running for a few hours. I ...


8

With only 200 miles on the engine, I'm thinking you could get away with using the same rings on the engine as long as you didn't see any scoring on the cylinder walls or any other obvious damage. With that said, a stock set of piston rings is dirt cheap for a 350 or a SBC in general ... as long as you are talking about the Gen I SBC and not a Gen III SBC ...


7

The Chevy Impala's 4T65E transmission was said to feature an updated Pressure Control Solenoid starting in 2003. This was a major issue in the 2000-2002 model years. But, there are still many people with the 2003MY vehicles that are experiencing the same issue as you. The vehicle may or may not already have illuminated a Check Engine Light due to the issue. ...


7

I don't know that car specifically, but it sounds like the auto-cancel mechanism is bent or mis-installed. Since it is integral with the steering column, you will probably need to pull off your steering wheel and get into where the switch mates with the column. There will be a plate or ring on the column with a tab or the like that will move a lever in the ...


7

I called a local Chevy dealership's service department out of curiosity. The technician I spoke to said that there is no way to access the car settings, that are available through the stock stereo, if the unit is replaced. He mentioned the factory integration adapter that you linked to. He said that it doesn't do anything to access those settings and that ...


7

If you can see and access the crack, a two-part epoxy or something like JB-Weld can be great for a temporary fix. This page shows the process on a metal radiator for a race car, but your fix would be similar. Clean the site of the repair, and rough up the surface with fine sand paper, especially if working on plastic. Mix the two-part epoxy and generously ...


7

Things you will need: Head unit Steering wheel audio control adapter compatible with the head unit. Example for your truck Dash kit. It allows for the radio to fit in the non-standard opening.Link to kits Factory system adapter. Allows you to plug in the head unit harness into the factory one and keep the current speaker system in place without splicing ...


7

I have a 97 suburban, so I believe things are very similar. I too have replaced lines on this truck and spent hours of time and over a gallon of fluid trying to get it bled correctly. A couple things that I've learned and have helped. Bench bleed the master. Remove the lines, install short lines, and have them go back to the reservoir on the master. Pump ...


7

The one tool you will need to purchase / borrow is a Volt Ohm Meter (sometimes called a Multimeter). Then you need to use it to read voltage AT THE BATTERY, before the car is started and after the car is started. My guess is you won't see any voltage difference. Before the car is started, I would guess you'd see voltages like 12.6v or so. After the car ...


7

I would use epoxy primer to start. You can then spray paintable undercoat on your frame, underbody. They come in various forms as depicted in the image below. You may also use a rocker guard type product as shown. To my personal taste, I would seal with epoxy primer, rubberized undercoat, and then oil undercoating to protect even further. Application ...


7

If you've changed the calipers and the pedal now goes all the way to the floor, chances are that you've introduced air into the system whilst you had the calipers off. To fix this, you need to "bleed" the braking system. At each brake caliper / wheel cylinder there is a bleed nipple or bleed screw. The basic procedure is to start at the wheel furthest ...


6

Three things I can think of: Do you have another key to try? May just not like the key you are trying. Is the steering wheel cocked at all, where there may be causing pressure on the key lock? Try giggling the steering column as you are trying to turn the key (assume you might have tried this, but don't know). Your locking mechanism may be frozen. You ...


6

Yes, it will. However, your biggest concern is going to be getting enough air flowing over it. Do yourself a favour and go look at the engine bay of a 200x model Subary Impreza WRX. The intercooler is mounted flat on the top of the engine and the characteristic scoop forces air onto it to cool the intake air. The same type of thing might work for your ...


6

As R.. says, the remaining softness will be down to air in the lines - this can be fixed by properly bleeding the system. Before you do that, however, you need to establish the cause of the loss - until you do so, the car should be regarded as dangerous and must not be used. If you're in any doubt, take it to a professional. The most likely cause of a ...


6

This is a 1967 Camaro which Chip Foose rebuilt on an episode of Overhaulin'. The sign in the background is the clue. EDIT: I guess I could tell you how to tell this is a '67 with or without knowing Chip Foose did this build :-) If you know anything about Camaros, you can tell this is a 1st gen by its angular cuts. The 2nd gens are not angular and are a lot ...


6

When sizing springs for a particular application, manufacturers have to get the right physical size for the job, but they also need to worry about the "spring rate" to properly support a given load. The spring rate is basically how much weight it takes to compress the spring. A larger engine is going to be a bigger static load for the suspension, and a ...


6

Putty/epoxy works but here's a handy tip I picked up from my materials professor to ensure that the crack doesn't propagate: Drill small holes at the ends of the crack to arrest its growth before using metal putty/epoxy to seal the existing crack. My dad used to own a Maxima that developed a crack in the radiator's aluminum head. The mechanic he took ...


6

Once your system expels as much fluid as it can via the pump there is still an additional amount of fluid that is left in the block and other areas that the pump can't push out because there isn't enough fluid and pump is just attempting to push air through the system. Some engines have block drain plugs. You would need to remove those, allow to drain and ...


6

It sounds like a valve adjustment is required There are many items that can make a 'ticking' noise that is tied to the RPM of the vehicle. Having the sound match RPM's certainly gives a clue that it is associated with the operation of the engine. Many times a valve adjustment is required. This is a component of a regular maintenance schedule for almost ...


6

I would replace the piston rings and inspect the pistons for any signs of damage. You are already investing money in repairing the engine. It does not make sense to skip such an important part. Make sure that the cylinder surface is prepared properly. A good machine shop should be able to do the work for not a lot of money. Note: If you comment about the ...


6

You are correct in how to do this. I was just watching an episode of "Tech Garage" and they were talking about this very topic. Their suggested methodology was to pull the fuel pump fuse, and run the engine till it stopped on it's own. You can now change out the fuel filter. You will still get some fuel out of the line, but nothing like having 30-60 psi of ...


5

I got that exact same product! The hose didn't work very well. I ended up buying a separate hose for $15 or so, with brass fittings. Also, as Patrick said, a large amount of refrigerant solves a large refrigerant leak. And it won't solve it for long. So, I recommend either Go to the shop and get a leak test, and a refill if it's slow. Buy a quality hose ...


5

Yes, that is the sway bar. There are usually just a couple of bushings (one per side) that attach it to the frame and then however they connect it to the suspension. Shouldn't be hard to replace at all, though monkeying it around to get it in and out may be interesting.


5

The compressor is a considerable load on your engine. In order to stop the engine from bogging the A/C usually has a way of raising the idle by letting more air past the throttle body. This function is where I think your problem lies. This can be a separate solenoid specific to the A/C system with a (fairly hefty) vacuum line to both before and after the ...


5

If it was never converted to use R134a instead of R12, you're not just going to be able to charge it up yourself, since something that old probably came from the factory with R12 refrigerant. You need a license to buy R12 in the United States, and it's not cheap. Since your system is compromised and needs attention anyway, you might as well do the R134a ...



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