Hot answers tagged

11

These 2005 Chevy Malibu Complaints are extremely common in this make and model vehicle. According to Car Complaints, this was a design flaw in the vehicle that caused the bulbs to burn so hot that they burned out the lights and melted the turn signal covers. The gaps introduced by the warped light covers have led to electrical system horror stories about ...


11

If you lost all (or almost all) of your brake fluid, you have a leak. Check all of your calipers (assuming disk brakes all around) to see if there is a leak at the wheels. If none there, check the soft lines (rubber lines at the wheel) for leaks. If no leaks there, check around the master cylinder and anti-lock brake unit for leaks from the lines. If you do ...


9

Here it the procedure for 're-learning' the master key for my Chevy Malibu. I assume that most Chevy's that have a transponder work this way well: With an unlearned master vehicle key, turn ON the ignition, but not the engine: Wait for roughly 10 minutes (mine was slightly longer) for the 'security indicator' to turn off: Turn the ignition completely ...


7

The Chevy Impala's 4T65E transmission was said to feature an updated Pressure Control Solenoid starting in 2003. This was a major issue in the 2000-2002 model years. But, there are still many people with the 2003MY vehicles that are experiencing the same issue as you. The vehicle may or may not already have illuminated a Check Engine Light due to the issue. ...


7

I don't know that car specifically, but it sounds like the auto-cancel mechanism is bent or mis-installed. Since it is integral with the steering column, you will probably need to pull off your steering wheel and get into where the switch mates with the column. There will be a plate or ring on the column with a tab or the like that will move a lever in the ...


7

I called a local Chevy dealership's service department out of curiosity. The technician I spoke to said that there is no way to access the car settings, that are available through the stock stereo, if the unit is replaced. He mentioned the factory integration adapter that you linked to. He said that it doesn't do anything to access those settings and that ...


7

If you can see and access the crack, a two-part epoxy or something like JB-Weld can be great for a temporary fix. This page shows the process on a metal radiator for a race car, but your fix would be similar. Clean the site of the repair, and rough up the surface with fine sand paper, especially if working on plastic. Mix the two-part epoxy and generously ...


7

Things you will need: Head unit Steering wheel audio control adapter compatible with the head unit. Example for your truck Dash kit. It allows for the radio to fit in the non-standard opening.Link to kits Factory system adapter. Allows you to plug in the head unit harness into the factory one and keep the current speaker system in place without splicing ...


6

Three things I can think of: Do you have another key to try? May just not like the key you are trying. Is the steering wheel cocked at all, where there may be causing pressure on the key lock? Try giggling the steering column as you are trying to turn the key (assume you might have tried this, but don't know). Your locking mechanism may be frozen. You ...


6

Yes, it will. However, your biggest concern is going to be getting enough air flowing over it. Do yourself a favour and go look at the engine bay of a 200x model Subary Impreza WRX. The intercooler is mounted flat on the top of the engine and the characteristic scoop forces air onto it to cool the intake air. The same type of thing might work for your ...


6

As R.. says, the remaining softness will be down to air in the lines - this can be fixed by properly bleeding the system. Before you do that, however, you need to establish the cause of the loss - until you do so, the car should be regarded as dangerous and must not be used. If you're in any doubt, take it to a professional. The most likely cause of a ...


6

This is a 1967 Camaro which Chip Foose rebuilt on an episode of Overhaulin'. The sign in the background is the clue. EDIT: I guess I could tell you how to tell this is a '67 with or without knowing Chip Foose did this build :-) If you know anything about Camaros, you can tell this is a 1st gen by its angular cuts. The 2nd gens are not angular and are a lot ...


6

Putty/epoxy works but here's a handy tip I picked up from my materials professor to ensure that the crack doesn't propagate: Drill small holes at the ends of the crack to arrest its growth before using metal putty/epoxy to seal the existing crack. My dad used to own a Maxima that developed a crack in the radiator's aluminum head. The mechanic he took ...


6

Once your system expels as much fluid as it can via the pump there is still an additional amount of fluid that is left in the block and other areas that the pump can't push out because there isn't enough fluid and pump is just attempting to push air through the system. Some engines have block drain plugs. You would need to remove those, allow to drain and ...


5

I got that exact same product! The hose didn't work very well. I ended up buying a separate hose for $15 or so, with brass fittings. Also, as Patrick said, a large amount of refrigerant solves a large refrigerant leak. And it won't solve it for long. So, I recommend either Go to the shop and get a leak test, and a refill if it's slow. Buy a quality hose ...


5

Yes, that is the sway bar. There are usually just a couple of bushings (one per side) that attach it to the frame and then however they connect it to the suspension. Shouldn't be hard to replace at all, though monkeying it around to get it in and out may be interesting.


5

The compressor is a considerable load on your engine. In order to stop the engine from bogging the A/C usually has a way of raising the idle by letting more air past the throttle body. This function is where I think your problem lies. This can be a separate solenoid specific to the A/C system with a (fairly hefty) vacuum line to both before and after the ...


5

If it was never converted to use R134a instead of R12, you're not just going to be able to charge it up yourself, since something that old probably came from the factory with R12 refrigerant. You need a license to buy R12 in the United States, and it's not cheap. Since your system is compromised and needs attention anyway, you might as well do the R134a ...


5

Find the location of your heater valve, and see what the temperatures are like on both sides. Might just need a new heater valve, which allows coolant to flow to heater.


5

It turns out the problem is pretty common with 3.5L Impalas. For some reason these engines lose coolant. Some blame is placed on head gaskets, some blame Dex-Cool. What ever the cause, refilling via the overflow jug can leave an air pocket in the cooling system. The cure is to fill via the pressure cap right to the top. Recheck the level after several ...


5

It does depend on the car. As Hillsons says, it might be a faulty gauge or sender, but it might also be the nature of the filler neck, as some designs don't flow well, resulting in the neck filling with fuel before the tank has - I had a car recently where you had to fill it at half-speed otherwise the pump would be constantly clicking off. Others I've seen ...


5

Definitely just insufficient current to run the starter motor. What happens (causing the flashing/clicking) is that when you turn the key, the starter relay/solenoid switches on, and the starter motor pulls all the available current, dropping the battery voltage extremely low. It can no longer power the relay, so the relay springs back and the load (starter ...


5

Single digit temperatures would not freeze your coolant assuming it has antifreeze mixed in appropriately and isn't just water. Since you went from 250 to 150 within seconds I would assume something was blocking the flow of fluid. Thermostat staying shut would be the most likely culprit. It could be that the cold weather is pushing a failing thermostat ...


5

Does it make the most sense to replace an old car's entire exhaust system all at once? Considering your car is almost 10 years old, having to replace all of the parts in the exhaust system does not sound unreasonable, especially if your locality uses any type of road solvent during the winter months (they didn't in Montana where I'm from originally, ...


5

There is a TSB 06-01-39-011A A/C - WHISTLE NOISE/BLOWER MOTOR STALLS/VIBRATES This bulletin only applies to Delphi-built HVAC cases, which can be easily identified by visually inspecting the HVAC case from under the passenger instrument panel. The Visteon case is bolted together at the case halves and the bolts are silver in color. The Delphi case ...


5

Referring to this website: If all is well and there is no slack in the timing chain then you will see about three to five degrees of "reverse motion" before the distributor begins to turn. To measure this, do the following: Get a socket which fits the front balancer crank shaft bolt. Get a breaker bar which is long enough to turn the crank using it. ...


5

When sizing springs for a particular application, manufacturers have to get the right physical size for the job, but they also need to worry about the "spring rate" to properly support a given load. The spring rate is basically how much weight it takes to compress the spring. A larger engine is going to be a bigger static load for the suspension, and a ...


4

My immediate thought there was the flasher relay. Pull this out and either test it outside the car or swap it for a known-good one. If that is not the fault, then as you rightly point out, you need to make sense of the wiring diagram... The key thing here is the wire colours. Most cars have two-colour wiring, with a main colour and a trace colour (i.e. the ...


4

They do work. I've used them often. If your low on freon, there may be a leak. However, if this is the case use a bottle of stop leak first or a bottle mixed with stop leak. It should seal up an value leakage. Replacing your AC unit is costly, most leaks can be fixed with a stop leak sealant unless the problem is serious. Save the hose you can reuse it. ...


4

This product solves one main problem(symptom), low freon. The issue with this is that most cases of a car that have low freon is caused by a leak somewhere in the system. If your car suddenly stopped blowing cold air, then this will most likely not fix your problem. Your problem is probably one of two things: A/C Compressor died Large freon leak I ...



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