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11

Chain maintenance is critically important for motorcycle safety. If this old chain has not been properly maintained throughout its life, you may be at higher risk of seized links or chain breakage. Best case scenario with a broken chain is that it comes off the bike cleanly and you coast safely to a stop, avoiding any encounters with surrounding traffic. ...


7

Lack of lubrication does lead to premature chain and sprocket wear, and loss of drivetrain efficiency. However, more important consideration in this case is safety. Safety It is absolutely essential to keep the chain cleaned and lubricated to prevent catastrophic failure that at best would result in snapped chain, and at worst can lead to binding and ...


6

If the chain is not lubricated it will wear prematurely.The chain does not stretch but grows in length as the pins and barrels wear.This has the effect of changing the distance between the rollers.As the chain grows it will no longer match the pitch of the drive sprockets, the sprockets will wear out prematurely.If you then change the chain it will be worn ...


5

Take the hard rubber pieces out of the sprocket assembly and put them in the hub. Note that they can only be installed one way. It does not matter if you install them in different locations in the hub. There should be something in your manual about greasing the parts that run around the axle, usually with NLGI 2. Then install the sprocket assembly and ...


4

I personally prefer citrus-based cleaner. I had used Park Tools bicycle chain cleaner, because I had it laying around, and it works great, although expensive. I plan on buying generic cleaner in large containers. It also has a benefit of being bio-degradable (oil and gunk is not, but at least it doesn’t add to the water-table pollution hazard). I usually ...


4

If the pictures I'm seeing of your bike are correct, you have the adjusters built into the swing arm. The proceedure should be in the owners/service manual for the bike, but here is a brief overview. I cannot stress enough that you should disregard the procedure below and reference the owners/service manual instead. On that note, you basically loosen the ...


4

Well, usually one would go about looking in the service manual... which if you plan on doing your own maintenance is essential and well worth the money. Typically on a motorcycle there are adjustment screws on the back of the swing arm that you screw one way to tighten and the other way to loosen. You need to loosen a bunch of stuff first (axle, adjuster ...


3

It sounds as though the rear-end is too tight. There is a straight rod which runs through the back of the bike which holds the rear-end together. You can see it in the circled in this picture: If this isn't torqued correctly, it will cause drag on the rear end. Sounds like your's is torqued too much. Another area to look at is to see if the rear brakes ...


3

A worn chain doesn't have to break to be a hazard. As the chain and sprockets wear the chain gets longer and the sprockets get smaller. This makes tensioning the chain difficult if not impossible as the jacking/tug bolts will not be long enough. If the teeth are worn bad enough the chain may not roll off the sprocket as it turns. This could cause the wheel ...


3

The rule-of-thumb I was taught is to pull the chain away from the back of the sprocket. If the chain pulls away by more than half a roller it's time to replace it.


3

I got this advice from this website: Go to your rear sprocket and pull straight back on the chain. If your chain pulls away from the sprockets by much, it is probably stretched out. If the chain does not pull away and stays right on the sprocket, then the chain is not stretched out yet. Also, if your sprockets no longer look like points but a bunch of ...


2

put the bike up on a rear stand clean the chain - use a degreaser designed for the purpose and a stiff nylon brush, wash a few bits at a time spinning the wheel to access more portions of the chain rinse off the degreaser use a water repellent to get rid of the water dry off with a rag use a good quality chain lube in a spray (there are different types ...


2

Those bikes are small engine, low torque and consequently have smaller/narrower chains. They are designed for use commuting to/from work with little or no protective clothing over your normal clothes. Consequently the chain needs to stop spatter getting on your clothes and as a result has a chain guard. The chain - due to its smaller weight and less torque ...


2

@marc covers the adjustment process well. However, uneven tension is a sign of wear, and can be a cause for chain replacement. Every chain driven bike has a maximum chain slack, and a minimum. Chain slack should be adjusted to the minimum allowable slack at the tightest point. After adjusting, the loosest point must also be checked. If the chain slack is ...


2

It is common for a chain to be tighter in certain spots than others, owing to some slight eccentricity of the sprockets. The generally accepted practice is to adjust chain tension relative to the tightest spot you can find, so that you avoid creating overly-tight spots, which could drastically accelerate the wear of the chain potentially leading to ...


2

If we are talking street applications, then use an o-ring chain, which means 'degreasing' is unnecessary, just cleaning. I have never changed chains at less than 20,000 mile intervals, with one change out after 40,000 miles out of paranoia, though that bike has an oiler installed. All I do to clean is put the bike on a center stand or rear stand, then ...


1

My perspective comes from the bicycle community. I admit there is a size and expense difference but I believe the principles are the same. The best longest lasting lubricant is the stuff the factory used while assembling the chain. It is in the right place which is between the side plates. It is viscous enough that it will not be thrown off at high RPM. ...


1

If you can get some penetrating lube similar to what you would on rusty bolts spray the offening link. This should help but only if the stiff link is due to rust or lack of lubrication. If the link was damaged it won't get better. In the U.S. we have Liquid wrench,SeaFoam, PB Blaster etc. you want something that is thin enough to seep between the plates. If ...



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