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5

Those are the remnants of gasoline When you let gasoline evaporate it leaves behind various elements within the gas that can't dissipate through evaporation. These remnants can clog various galley's in your carburetor as well as clog jets. Even if you are soaking your carburetor you will still want to physically clean out the jets and use compressed air ...


4

What is the optimal use of a choke? Knowing how to use it as explained by Nic C What are the cons of using it incorrecly? Fouling spark plugs which will cause a misfire even after it warms up. Gasoline getting in the oil past the piston rings due to being over rich too long and and causing pre-mature engine wear and lower compression due to the ...


7

You should avoid over-use of the choke if possible, as over-fuelling the engine will cause more carbon build up, shortening the life of the plugs and reducing the time before the engine needs a "decoke" to get rid of the build-up. Plus it wastes fuel! Of course, too little is just as bad... I've always gone for the following, though I don't know if it's ...


2

I eventually bought the car. After a bit of searching it turned out the issue was caused by wrong choke plate setting - the bimetallic spring tension was to low and sometimes the choke was kept open too much when cold and sometimes it didn't fully open after warming up. Simply turning the autochoke mechanism by a couple of degrees solved the problem.


10

Carburetor Circuits Will Still Pull Fuel from the System If the engine is running on a carbureted vehicle, off throttle or not, it will consume fuel. Throttle Settings There are three basic circuits in a most carburetors that provide fuel to the ICE. Idle Circuit - effects fuel metering at low RPM conditions where the throttle plate is closed. Secondary ...


14

At a base level, carburetors meter the amount of fuel they let into the engine by the amount of air that is moving through them. Vacuum is created by the piston moving in the engine and creating an open space. As the piston moves down, it creates an empty volume which pulls in air through the only opening it can find, which is the passageway through the ...


15

Carburettors are very crude in comparison to EFI systems, and so the amount of fuel entering the engine is simply a factor of the amount of air going in, which is controlled by the position of the butterfly (and hence by the throttle position). At a completely closed throttle, there will therefore still be some fuel getting in, enough to keep the engine ...


6

More than likely, you have an air leak If you haven't cleaned out and rebuilt a bunch of 4 carburetor banks in your life there is a good chance you have accidentally created an air leak in the system. Unmetered air will create the symptoms you describe. The giveaway on most lean conditions is the falling idle. It idles high and is getting enough fuel but ...



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