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2

You are describing a lean condition The more you open your throttle the more vacuum you are creating in your carburetor venturi and your intake manifold. When you are operating at higher RPM any unmetered air leaks into your system can become more obvious. Unmetered air is air that is getting into your system after the fuel has been delivered. If you ...


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It sounds a lot like a fuelling issue to me, I'd suggest a systematic approach to the carbs. Get the workshop manual for the bike and try the following: Check fuel supply Check float level Check idle mixture Check that jets are clear Check that all vacuum hoses are routed and connected correctly Check that carb diaphragms are intact and needles slide ...


3

Upto to which point this air can be reduced. (I mean in the AFR ratio like 10: 1 , 8: 1) ? Realize, if you were to open the butterflies and nothing else were to occur (no additional fuel), you'd be going lean (higher air to fuel ratio ... 16:1, 18:1, and much higher). The computer or carburetor in most vehicles will control the amount of fuel ...


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Let me see if I can clear some of this up for you. The stoichiometric ratio (AFR) for the petrol is 14.7 : 1 right? This is correct, and it's important to understand the concept of stoichiometric ratio. It means that when the fuel and air are burned, they must be in this ratio if you want them to combine completely, with nothing left over (well, none of ...


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The ratio is typically maintained. About 14:7 for idle, cruise, part throttle, and a bit richer (12-13:1) for WOT . The butterfly valve controls how much air goes into the engine. The carburetor or fuel injection system's job is to match the amount of fuel going into the engine to the amount of air going in.


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In Australia, our Automotive LPG hose standard is: • AS/NZS 1869 class D According to the following document, it appears that in the US propane hoses for automotive use needs to meet: • NFPA 58, Liquefied Petroleum Gas Code, 11.6 • Referenced ASTM Piping and Tubing Standards http://www.afdc.energy.gov/pdfs/48612.pdf Edit: When searching for lines, make ...


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If I then pull the clutch and completely stay of the gas, the rpm stays at 6000 and doesn't drop Sounds like you did something wrong during the rebuild, all you can do is pull the carbs and check your work, also check throttle cables for proper routing and adjustment. Did you clean the fuel tank valve and screen?


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They used different manufacturers and models of carburetors through the years, or it could have been replaced with a different kind. You are best to pull the carb and gently clean it to find mfg or model numbers stamped into the throttle base or on a tag http://www.steinertractor.tv/Wrenching-with-Rachel/How-to-identify-your-carburetor/189272--3848536


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Your carbs are clogged with varnish and bad gas The remnants of gas that has evaporated are a gummy hard varnish inside of your carburetors. You have a bit of work to do. You need to completely disassemble the carburetors and thoroughly clean all of the nooks, crannies, jets, fuel galley's and air galley's in order to get your bike back in working order. ...


5

It sounds like your carb(s) are plugged and need cleaned. If the fuel in the carbs has ethanol in it, the carbs are going to be caked with crap. The floats could be ruined. There are a lot of things going on. Getting the carbs rebuilt or at the very least cleaned up, is going to be a must. All of the symptoms you saying are pointing to carb issues.


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Those are the remnants of gasoline When you let gasoline evaporate it leaves behind various elements within the gas that can't dissipate through evaporation. These remnants can clog various galley's in your carburetor as well as clog jets. Even if you are soaking your carburetor you will still want to physically clean out the jets and use compressed air ...


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What is the optimal use of a choke? Knowing how to use it as explained by Nic C What are the cons of using it incorrecly? Fouling spark plugs which will cause a misfire even after it warms up. Gasoline getting in the oil past the piston rings due to being over rich too long and and causing pre-mature engine wear and lower compression due to the ...



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