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11

It is highly probable that the reason your car was reluctant to start was that the time you were running diagnostics had sapped some of the charge from the battery. The battery on the car will not charge unless the engine is running. It is unlikely that this device would harm your vehicle but it is theoretically (and practically) possible to do temporary ...


6

To my knowledge there is no way a scanner can cause issues with your computer electronics. This device is a read only device. It doesn't change anything in your computer. It does, however, communicate with the computer. Through this communication it can give the computer commands, such as to clear the codes. This doesn't write anything to the computer, but ...


5

While this might be a great question for the reverse engineering site that's in beta, I'll give you my take. Hardware Options 1) They make an ODB II <==> UART hardware interface, that will give you serial access to your CAN signals. You can effectively read and write signals to the bus. 2) There are boards like Freescale's SABRE Automotive ...


5

There is a distinction that needs to be made between: OBD: this is an interface, that specifies the physical and electrical parameters required to connect a diagnostic computer and the car's electronics in a standard way. This is the bit that is mandatory by legal requirement, so that a car manufacturer cannot "lock in" its vehicles by requiring service to ...


4

CAN-C is the high speed bus that connects the engine, brakes, airbags etc. CAN-IHS is a low speed bus that connects the comfort systems like radio and climate controls.


4

No. The tool in and of itself cannot do any "harm" to the vehicle. If you were testing apps with the engine off, it is quite possible that the battery may have drained to the extent that it gave some hiccups while starting. Low fuel level may also be to blame here. However, If the vehicle has error codes present which are cleared with the tool, the ...


3

There are two basic approaches, you can tap a speed sensor directly before it reaches the computer, or use OBD II signals (generated by the computer). Sensors usually generate a voltage, so you have to find the wire you are interested in and then install an analog-to-digital converter. This then has to either go directly to a COM port (if your computer has ...


3

The answer would be yes if the vehicle was produced after 2008, otherwise no. in the following article it states it is required as one of the signalling protocols in OBD2 Post 2008. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/On-board_diagnostics#OBD-II_signal_protocols So presently vehicles that are currently being produced do have a CAN channel included in the OBD2 ...


3

My recommendation is that you start with Bosch CAN 2.0 spec, and then move on to openXc, if you have access to a newer Ford vehicle, they provide you with details on how to leverage some CAN interfaces. Another thing to note is that OBD is a standard, but the implementation of CAN is not, different vehicles will have CAN buses wired to different pins on the ...


3

A full CAN message consists of a FRAME ID and a MESSAGE. You're probably going to have to Reverse Engineer the CAN messages to find out which message you want to put on the bus. The answer there also deals with how to read messages as well. As far as specifically addressing the ECU, not sure how you would do that without having the official documentation, ...


3

What you are wanting to do is possible. I've had similar experience and desire for my 2010 Camry. From my experience, reading messages from the OBD-II port wasn't getting me anywhere. It was like the CAN messages were only a response to me manually manipulating the the car. I would get a message response from locking or unlocking the doors with the key ...


3

Usually the OBD CAN bus is 'bridged' onto the other CAN buses of the vehicle, in order to facilitate diagnostics of ECUs on the other buses. However, the bridge may only pass diagnostic messages onwards :( It's different on every platform. In terms of the protocol - its a classic reverse engineering problem. You need to capture a few traces of the CAN ...


2

OBD is a standard for a diagnostics port that provides emissions-related info on the diagnostics port. Contrary to popular belief its purpose isn't to prevent lock-in by car manufacturers but only to allow service centers a standard way to access emissions-related info required for mandatory checks like the "MOT test" (as they call it in the UK). The ...


2

The two requirements are separate. OBDII is required in all vehicles since 1996. This is primarily an emissions related regulation to formalize how vehicles would relay emissions failures to the user and to mechanics. The standard has many parts, but it primarily designated a connector, its pinout, and allowed one of five different electrical signalling ...


2

How is the OBD and CAN exactly related? Controller Area Network (CAN) is ISO 11898 standard. It, like most other networks, is based off of the OSI model. It specifies certain parameters for communications between vehicle systems. CAN was first specified in 1986 by Robert Bosch at the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) congress. CAN uses serial ...


2

If I were the guy who designed the electronics, I would make it impossible to do this via CAN-Bus simply because you get bluetooth adapters for OBD2 that someone standing outside the car could pair with and send the unlock instruction to. It's a safety hazard, so I wouldn't support it.


2

CAN bus is actually a fairly complex protocol, similar to USB in many ways. However, your OBD-II to FTDI adapter is probably just implementing the OBD-II part of this protocol, which is pretty simple (after all, they are converting it to a serial interface). Use the serial communication tools built into MATLAB to do this (e.g., to communicate ASCII to a ...


2

I was looking for the similar thing and stumbled on a page which describes the protocol for the 650gs. I haven't managed to try it out yet but it seems promising. http://www.f650gs.crossroadz.com.au/Diagnostics.html Topic is discussed here as well: http://f650.com/forum/showthread.php?25550-Diagnostic-plug-pinout-does-anyone-have-it Plese let my know how ...


2

I don't think CAN is a necessary part of OBD, it's just the most commonly used system. The OBD requirements are for consistent diagnostics (so that, in theory, any car can be plugged into a standard reader and give a standard set of error codes), wheras CAN is a method for the internal components of the car to communicate (similar in many ways to the USB ...


2

None of this is true. In the same way as there was an EU Directive that all cars be equipped with ABS but TVR didn't subscribe to this. My uncle has just sold a 2005 Caterham Se7en CSR-200 which used MBE management and was definitely not CAN-BUS. We're building another one in October of this year and if it genuinely is CAN-BUS I'll let you know but I have ...


1

Looking at the reset procedure for the SAS (Steering Angle Sensor) on Ross Tech VCDS wiki here it would appear that within this software measuring blocks 08 groups 007 is returning real-time steering angle data in degrees. Where this data is located other than that I'm afraid I don't know. The part number for the SAS on VAG cars appears to be 1J0-959-654-J ...


1

The CAN-bus in its simple form is two wires that a series of microprocessors connect on too. There is not a processor to read or write to for 'CAN'. As the dealer has illustrated, you talk to the boots processor(body processor) to activate or de-activate the features of the processor. CAN - two wires, hi and lo, with a 120 ohm resistor joining them together ...


1

Even if you connect to the correct bus and broadcast the correct CAN message you still run into the issue, of transmitting a CAN message that is already being transmitted by another ECU. The way CAN works, every can message has an Arbitration ID also referred to as the message id. Under normal operation, no ECU will ever broadcast a message with the same ID ...


1

You can petition Ford to release it, as they have for the Focus, Escape, and some other cars with their OpenXC SDK Alternatively, you can try to hack the OpenXC to work with it. I imagine the protocols are there, just slightly different.



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