Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

I don't know about material showing the difference, but the explanation is pretty easy: an interference motor has pistons and valves which share the same space within the engine at different times - if the cam/valve timing gets interrupted for any reason, damage between cam and valve may occur; the non-interference (or free running) motor does not have ...


2

While both Paulster2's and Steve Matthews's have good answers, there is another thing to consider. The 3.5 V-6 equipped Camrys that year (not sure about the 4 cly) have what Toyota calls Active Control Engine Mounts. They use vacuum and electricity to control the mounts. Also on the 3.5 engine it's quite an extensive repair to get to the alternator off, and ...


1

I think the problem was probably there before and you are just noticing it. Lots of times, the problems we experience with vehicles happens over time. Motor mounts are one such thing. They do not wear out overnight or just give up the ghost all of a sudden (in the vast majority of the cases). Most of the time, as these things wear out, we don't notice it ...


3

Depending on the design of your car, the engine mounts may have been removed during the alternator removal and replacement so any damage may now show up. Alternatively, if the alternator previously wasn't working and is now drawing on the vehicles RPM to charge the batter, the idle may have dropped (which could account for the vibration). If the vibration ...


1

There are three different engines offered for the Highlander & Camry which are the 3.0L V6. All three are of the 1MZ-FE model. It appears one version of the engine was used from 1994-2006 in the Camry. It produced 168–190 hp @ 5200–5400 rpm with 183–193 lb·ft of torque at 4400 rpm. Wikipedia says: Horsepower ratings dropped after the Society of ...



Top 50 recent answers are included