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The rear brake adjusment on most vehicles includes a bi-metal, heat sensitive arrangement which prevents the brakes being adjusted once they become hot operationally. You need to make sure this arrangement on your vehicle is working properly. The way it works is that when the brakes are cold the brakes are able to adjust up. When the brakes are hot, the drum ...


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It may be that your brake shoes are too close to the contact area. Does your handbrake click at least 4 times before it grips tight? If not, then you can adjust the shoes to allow more clicks on the handbrake. Metal contracts slightly when it's cold, so this may in fact be the case. Another thing that usually happens is that the mechanism within the brakes ...


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The Lexus RX 330 have self-adjusting disc brakes all round. They are servo assisted and are adjusted simply by pressing the brake pedal a couple of times to prime the system. Some drivers do not realise the servo effect and may think they have a problem. Do this to determine the servo operation: With the engine turned off, pump the brake pedal until you have ...


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This sounds like an ABS failure.


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You replaced pads + ROTORS. You didn't mention retrying the old rotors when you retried the old pads.Rotor setback or proper centering or proper Sizing(diameter/thickness)could be an issue,as well quality. Good luck! J.R.


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I have seen articles on brake pad bedding and some say it may take as much as 300 miles


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When ever you turn rotors, you should replace and re-embed new pads too. If you didn't do that, you still perhaps have a mis-matched groove. A heavy vehicle going down mountains will eat brakes like crazy.


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Specified tightening torque can very greatly from vehicle to vehicle. Anywhere from 25-100 ft. lbs. Since brake calipers tend to be exposed to the elements, you will probably need a bit more to break it free.


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To actually answer the question, no, 50 ft lbs won't be strong enough. Typical brake caliper (you need to remove the caliper to remove the disc) bolt torque is over a 100 ft lbs. For example, 2003 Dodge Caravan caliper bolts are supposed to be torqued to ~125 ft-lbs.


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Could be any number of things honestly... I honestly doubt it is the brake pads. But as @ZPrime notes, riding the breaks can generate crazy heat and that could screw up the wheel bearings pretty quickly. At any rate, I think the most likely causes are wheel bearings, tie rod ends or other suspension components or bad wheel balance. It could also be a ...


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It could be bad pads / uneven pad wear. You say it's only when going down mountains - are you riding the brakes regularly down the grade? Don't do that! Downshift the car into a lower gear and allow the motor to help slow the car, only apply the brakes in brief spurts if you are moving too quickly. Lightly riding the brakes all the way down will cause ...


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The information & links posted by Paulster2 offer excellent explanation of what the various types of brake fluid are. There are a few grade : DOT3 DOT4 DOT5 DOT5.1 The difference between them is a specificed standard regarding the boiling temperature, which rises as the DOT number rises, and amount of water absorption. There are based on two ...


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What's wrong with utilizing a regular socket wrench with the correct attachments? It is my experience if you utilize power equipment to reattach such fasteners, you will over tighten and quite possibly strip out the fasteners in the process. Will it take it off, quite possibly, depending on how much torque was applied to mount them in the first place.


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I found this description of synthetic based brake fluids. According to the page, all brake fluids are technically "synthetic" in that they are man made and do not contain a petroleum base. "Synthetic" brake fluid, as we think of it, has a silicon base. Non-synthetic brake fluid (normal brake fluid) is glycol based. There are trade offs to each type. Silicon ...



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