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I was curious about the difference in regular Dot 4 brake fluid for my motorcycle and the Valvoline synthetic Dot 3 & 4 brake fluid I just came home with. After reading this thread I was happy to see I wasn't the only one with the question of was it OK to mix regular dot 4 with synthetic dot 4. Even tho this bottle does say its synthetic on the front, ...


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I change the rotors and pads at the same time. I like the knowledge that my brake parts have the same service life. I live in a harsh climate that takes a toll on all parts that are close to the ground (snow,ice,salt, sand,rain and Lord knows what) attacking them. Safety is always worth a few extra bucks.


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This symptom is a classic for lug nuts coming lose while you are driving. When lug nuts come lose the wheel will vibrate and after a time, as other lugs on that wheel come lose, it will scare you to death. Check all the wheels for lose lugs as it is hard to identify the correct rim with the lose lugs. Sadly, I know this by experience.


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There are three common ways for disc brakes to stick, and what you were experiencing is definitely symptomatic of stuck brakes. The caliper slides might be rusted The piston in the caliper is getting crooked in the bore and not retracting The brake hose has collapsed internally and is not releasing pressure The easiest thing to inspect is the pins, but ...


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3 ways: Drive the vehicle and do both light braking from 25mph then hard braking from 55mph, if the brake pedal pulses up and down or the steering wheel shakes or vibrates, then you have at least one warped rotor. If stops are smooth and relatively noise free then go to #2 below. Pull the rotors and do a visual inspection, look for cracks (even small ones) ...


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sounds like something to do with the brake hydraulics. possibly brake booster? Need to state more information like HOW & WHEN things happen... What CAR? etc. ... The noise is very odd, but MIGHT be attributable to sticking brake components that suddenly come loose. Possible that some other kind of electronic control on your brakes is acting up as well, ...


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Cutting rotors is required when the surface is not uniform - has grooves from old pads. If your surface is smooth, you don't need to cut. Yes it can be the case that you need to cut only front or rear rotors. Vibration will go away on it's own, but you need to adjust your braking habits - if you are braking hard, try not to stop and keep holding your ...


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No, you are best off with blank rotors(no slots, no holes) just like stock. Slotted rotors are more aggressive on the pads. Drilled rotors are plain dangerous unless they are a good quality(read expensive) that were cast with holes in place not drilled after the casting. generally, cheap drilled rotors are for looks only. They are also less efficient in ...


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First drive a bit and measure the temperature of the wheels with a gauge or even by touch. Whichever are hotter, that side is jamming. Then based on that, remove the wheel, and remove the caliper. Typical caliper consists of 2 pins that it moves on and one piston that pushes against the inner pad. The pins is what you are after. They should be easily ...


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The brake shake has to be from either warped rotors or irregular grabbing of the pads on the rotors. Warping: You said you just put on new rotors, right? Really new ones? Its possible that one of the new rotors isn't square to its mounting. I would think you'd be able to see this with a dial indicator. Are you sure the flat inner surface of the rotors ...


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When putting the tires back onto the car after replacing the rotors and pads, you need to torque the nuts to the proper specification. If you don't, and or if you don't use a star pattern to torque down the lug nuts, you can warp the rotor. Do you have, or can you borrow a dial indicator? With that and a magnetic base you can measure the run out on your ...


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I drove my 2001 Bonneville 437,000 miles over the course of 10 years and NEVER changed the brake fluid. Take it for what it's worth.


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I'm not familiar with Ford Focus, but I used to have a '77 Plymouth Fury that had this problem, it was a valve in the master cylinder not allowing the front brakes to release, and any dragging would cause expansion to cause the brakes to apply, aggravating the condition to the point where it wouldn't move, even though I was spinning the back wheels on dry ...


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Next time you hear it click, come to a full stop, back up a bit, apply the brakes again to come to a stop, and try it forward again, listening for another click. If it clicks again, I'd say either the pads are loose enough to slide a bit or possibly the caliper slide pins. I wouldn't worry about safety in either case.


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Here are some places to start: You car has a wheel bearing inside a wheel hub assembly (the part you bolt the tire to), there are also one or two control arms that are part of your suspension. Normally the bushings inside these control arms tear or disintegrate (they are usually a rubber compound) and the mounting components (a pin and clevis system) will ...


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I've checked the brake fluid frequently and also yes I've tried a couple different brands. Even dot 4 when in the manual it says dot 3. Only thing that seems to help is letting the car sit and press on the brakes while the car is off so loosen them up.


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Your procedure for bleeding is fine, except for the banjo bolt You can bleed a line at the banjo bolt but you can't bleed a caliper. You can get your stuck nipple off if you break the head by using a bolt extractor. If you use a bolt extractor and have to drill it out in any way you will NEED to disassemble the caliper to ensure it does not have any metal ...


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My first guess would be a warped or marred rotor. By "marred" I mean a section of the surface has been corrupted by a corrosive or partly glazed, so that it is smoother or rougher than the rest of the rotor. Both of these can be diagnosed by the same treatment. Have the rotor "turned" (almost any auto parts or machine shop should do it for less than $30). If ...


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No, you can still have air trapped in the rear caliper/wheel cylinder. Removing the line could introduce air to the caliper or wheel cylinder. Unfortunately, this means you might end up replacing your rear calipers / wheel cylinders also. It has happened to me a number of times. Be sure to spray it with some good penetrating oil and use a 6 point socket. ...


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What is a freely spinning wheel? Of course, you should be able to spin the wheel by hand, but beneath the brake, bearing and transmission can apply lots of drag. My rear wheels do about 1.5 to 2 turns, my front wheels not more than half a turn when I put them in rotation by hand. While it's the same for the front wheel of my mother's car, its rear wheels ...


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To my mind, a wheel should spin freely when spun on the jack. A little noise is acceptable but if the wheel is clearly being slowed down excessively or is particularly hot after use, something is not right. As regards causes for brake drag, there do indeed include seized or sticking pistons but could also include sticky or corroded caliper slides (the ...


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Going only from the information here, I'd say there were two issues going on. Firstly, I'd say that the brake job was done incorrectly/badly. A squeaky noise when you apply the brakes is often because the mechanic didn't put any copperslip or similar hi temperature grease on the back of the brake pads (not the bit touching the caliper!). The 'not stopping ...


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Attributes of Exhaust (Jake brake) and Compression Brakes Compression (Jake) Brake Jake brakes slow a vehicle by releasing pressure Jake brakes are operated at the valve train. Jake brakes open the exhaust valve at the top of the compression stroke. Jake brakes use the compression of the compression stroke to provide gas compression resistance to slow the ...


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It's almost a bit normal Your brake pads aren't lined up on the wear grooves of your disc. What is very common on dirtbikes is to get a few grooves, not necessarily deep, cut into the discs/rotors. When you put the wheel back onto the bike the pads on your front caliper were just a little bit off. There really isn't any tool or special alignment you ...


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The sequence matters. If you have a lot of air right after your master cylinder for whatever reason, that air can travel to any point in the system. At some point, the hydraulic line attached to the master cylinder will branch to each of the four wheels. As you pump the brakes, the air will propagate down the hydraulic line, and randomly go down one of the ...


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I went ahead with Abbottcost's advice and messaged EBC Barkes directly. They replied promptly with a detailed answer to my question. Here is an excerpt for the email: We only powder coat the rear of the pad so as not to get too much powder coat on the friction surface, this means the rough overspray can look a little untidy. The Brake-In coating is a ...


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More than likely the sound the car is making is the wheel bearing or the rotor hitting, torque spec for the front axle nut is 158 ft.lbs. The C1422 probably occurred from a low voltage situation and the sensor needs to be re-calibrated. C1413 is probably due to the axle nut being loose.


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If nothing else works.... Look into the "Master Cylinder" I owned an 03 VW Passat... And my brakes would lock up on me and I would continue to drive... Melting all calipers rotors... The computer will not recognize this problem, as I went to 4 different VW certified repair shops... None could find the source of my problem... in fact they replaced all ...


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Checked EBC website FAQ There was a question on cross drilled rotors, that were represented as genuine EBC brand. Here is the last sentence of their reply: If you have any doubts that you are being supplied genuine EBC Brakes products contact EBC Brakes immediately for an opinion on warranty@ebcbrakes.com I would recommend sending your concerns, ...


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That 'C' out of line (and the font looks a bit different) is suspicious. Most companies are super-picky about their logos. Quality of printing is terrible, and I would assume a real manufacturer would use printing that would withstand a bit of brake cleaner let alone a bit of finger smooshing. The printing looks a bit like it was something like pad ...


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Just by going off the print quality of the silk screens shown in EBC's website images versus the ones on the actual break pads. I'd conclude they are made in an inferior factory. They are most likely counterfeit parts that were actually made in China.


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I can see two differences: The EBC website shows a 3D view of the brake pads, which show a different shape for the black region. This may be because you have a different brake pad shape from the one in the 3D view. The "brake-in coating" tri-color tone also seems like it's missing from your images. However, it's hard to conclude anything based on the ...


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There's a specific bleed procedure for the ABS If you didn't follow the procedure, it could be the root cause of your issue. Here is the procedure, straight from the factory manual. Antilock Brake System Automated Bleed Procedure [ Caution: Refer to Brake Fluid Irritant Caution in Cautions and Notices. Notice: Refer to Brake Fluid Effects on ...


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Back in the '80's, I did motorcycle collision repair professionally in California. I straightened quite a few bent forks, using a hydraulic press. We would straighten the triple clamps along with the fork tubes. First, if the bend was severe, there is likely a crease in the fork tube along the lower edge of the lower triple clamp. We would turn the fork ...


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Diesel-electric railroad locomotives do use regenerative braking, but they call it "dynamic braking". Also, they don't store the energy, they blow it off through resistor grids and fans at roof level. Full electric locomotives and some streetcars can generally feed the regenerated power back into the wire or third rail; this is much simpler in DC systems. ...



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