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A few years ago I had replaced my rear brakes with ceramic pads and new rotors. Later that day I was driving out of town and noticed exactly what you are describing. I pulled over to the side and pulled the rear tire off to see what the problem was, thinking it was a stuck caliper or something. When I got it off, I noticed there was nothing wrong. Nothing ...


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Opinion The cost of high performance pads and calipers seems like a very high cost for such an issue. If you believe that the mechanic is correct and that there are no issues with the OEM products then perhaps looking for alternatives is sensible option. Consider this. When this Toyota rolled of the showroom floor and didn't stop well, is that the way ...


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All good advise but if the wheel bearings are not changed make sure you regrease them. Make sure all old grease is cleaned out as it will be badly burnt. Burnt grease will kill your bearings within a very short period.


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Check the master cylinder cap, but you should use either DOT3 or DOT4 fluid without issues (Valvoline has fluid which is DOT3 & 4 ... this is to tell people you can use it for either application, though it will perform as DOT4). Stay away from DOT5 because it would no be compatible with your system (basically, anyway ... there are a plethora of reasons ...


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Because it's cheaper to produce. And that may not be so bad since it's cheaper for you as well, to maintain at least. They are also smaller in dia (not width necessarily) for the same braking force when compared to discs. This is due to the fact that the entire surface of the brake pads press against (and at) the circumference (in an axial direction). If you ...


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Drum brake using smooth driving stop & load based vehicle must used drum brake.working parts are simple mechanisum.


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No, you can't re-use the pads - they will have worn into the shape of the damaged/misaligned discs, and so won't bed properly on new discs.


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It sounds to me like you either don't have enough brake fluid in the system, or that the pedal travel is different now for whatever reason. But I'm also skeptical of drilled and slotted rotors. They have less surface area that actually comes in contact with the brake pad, so the net effect is that your brake pads are "smaller". I think you might have two ...


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Several things can contribute to poor braking. Pads not heated - as u stated. Fluid on the rotor - unlikely brakes not bedded in - happened to me once. The contact path on the pads were not optimal. Also, how are you doing the brake test? I have hawk street pads and if i speed off in the mornings from my cold start, and THEN hold my brake, i better not ...


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This is an answer to a variation of the problem: When ABS activates, the brake pedal goes to the floor but returns to normal height unless ABS is activated again. This applies to a Saturn S-series (SC, SW, SL) and may apply to other makes and models as well. The ABS system uses a series of solenoids and valves to redirect fluid flow. A set of valves ...


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As @mikes stated, you will need to inspect the brakes to see if they are leaking. A good way to do this is to change out the fluid in the system. By bleeding the brakes all the way around, you will be putting fresh fluid into the system and allowing it to work as good as it's going to at this point. Brake fluid should be changed every two years at a minimum, ...


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Check the master cylinder fluid level. If it is low or empty you have a leak. If the reservoir is full the likely cause is a bad master cylinder. To find the leak fill the master cylinder and pump the brake pedal several times. you should see it drip. depending on where the leak is you may have to crawl under the vehicle and look for a wet spot or stain.



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