New answers tagged

1

Did you regularly changed the brake fluid? A long overdue brake fluid can cause corrosion in the brake parts. When the seized brakes happen, do the brake pedal feels different? Normally a sticking brake come from a seized brake piston in the caliper. If the calipers and brake hoses are 100% fine then i suspect either the master brake cylinder or the brake ...


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Assuming that disc brakes on a motorcycle are similar to those on a bicycle, it is possible that the rotor – which is on the wheel – is no longer aligned with the caliper on the fork. This could explain your first point if the wheel was not returned to its previous location after changing the tyre. All it would take for this to happen is for there to be a ...


2

Friction etc. Think of all the moving parts in a engine: It already costs power to move Pistons, valves, shafts and belts due to friction. The dependency between RPM and this power is not linear, if you increase the RPM by a factor of 2, the power usually increases by a factor larger than 2. The aggregates consume power, too, and it's also said that the ...


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I'm not aware of any such formula. The biggest factor at play is the engine rpm, but there are a zillion little things that affect the engine's internal friction, and engineers have been working their asses off for decades to reduce this friction by tiny amounts. Any "coefficient of braking" or whatever would have to be an empirically measured number. When ...


1

I love engine braking, but it's always been a bit of a mystery to me how it works. Reading up on it, it seems that: When you close the throttle (let go of the gas), this obviously closes the throttle plate, cutting off the air supply to the engine The cutoff air supply causes a small vacuum The engine's intake valves still open when they are supposed to, ...


2

Regenerative braking is only really useful on electric or hybrid cars for the simple reason that they have a way to make use of the energy stored. Also once you have an electric motor as part of the drive train regenerative braking is pretty much built in (at least in terms of hardware) as you simply use the existing motor(s) a a generator and divert the ...


2

Based on all the information in the comments as well, it sound like the throttle body is the issue. My buddy who's a master mechanic said that the FI does not have an air bypass, so when the throttle body gets dirty it will often cause a low idle or stalling issue. Based on this forum thread your idle should be 500-600 RPM, and not less. Try cleaning the ...


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Brake (at least on my old Ford system) is just the emergency brake. If I were to guess it's more than likely a separate, unrelated issue. I would look into the E brake sensor, see if the E brake is sticking and/or see if there's slack in the E brake line. Did you find out which of the sensors/wiring harnesses is bad (ABS issue)?


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Get your ABS system checked. If you want to start the procedure yourself: Jack one corner of your car up and place it on a jackstand. Remove the wheel. Look for the electrical connector of that wheel and inspect it. Disconnect it and perform an electrical test on it. First, measure the AC voltage the sensor produces when you are turning the wheel by hand (...


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Inspect your passenger side for something bent that could cause your bracket to not line-up where it should. Since you said that the passenger side bracket is of a slightly different size, it may be the wrong bracket. Often, there are "option" brakes available that require a different bracket, maybe somebody needed to replace that bracket and got the wrong ...


3

Either rotor should fit on either side. Something is wrong. It could be that one rotor wasn't machined correctly, or that something is odd with the hub. Start by looking at both of them carefully, you may see an obvious difference. Failing that, if you have appropriate measuring tools, see if you can find a difference that accounts for the misfit. If that ...


3

You've been sold the wrong rotors. Don't machine the new rotors, that would be considered damaging them, voiding the return. Don't buy an aftermarket caliper bracket, you will have the same problem, or the wrong part. Just buy the correct rotors. Return the others.


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This has happened to me with a defective ABS sensor (front, passenger). I mistakenly gouged it while changing the wheel bearing which caused it to intermittently give false signals at lower speeds (ABS ring turning slowly = sensor misinterpreting it as stopped?). Typically faulty sensors will throw the ABS warning light, which mine eventually did.


3

It could also be a defective strut or shock absorber. I am having the exact same issue myself presently. When a strut is empty of fluid and gas there is no dampening effect and you are bouncing on your springs. This effect is also noticed when braking at low speeds as well as when turning. When braking with dead struts your tires have intermittent contact ...


2

Brake pedal pulsing is most likely ABS engaging. To disable ABS, remove the fuse for it in the fuse box that is under the hood. Do have a shop look at your ABS system if the light has been coming on. Erratic brakes are not something you would want.


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I believe this is due to a warped rotor. The pulsing will be due to raised areas on the rotor pushing back against the brake pads.


3

One thing to keep in mind here is that you're looking at the same problem either way – with a manual you're wearing the friction materials in the clutch, with an automatic the wear is happening to the brakes. But either way you're converting some of the excess energy into heat and friction. Obviously this is something that cars have to be designed to handle. ...


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...in other words: no damage, only that the parts would get a lot hot and some little degree of worn out for the brake shoes/pads. One thing very important tho: if that happens again NEVER pour water to the brakes, even if they smoke. Never do that, those metals will get very hot, if you water them, they will bend and in the typical scenario, they may crack.


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If you feel the single click when brake pedal goes near floor it means break oil and brake lines have air bubbles which have loosened the strength and the point at which it clicks means that your pedal ha got passed the press limit due to fault.bleed the brake oil and release extra air add some new brake fluid.keeping in view that disc pads are normal and ...


3

If the car is running If the noise is "clacking" and the car is running, it is typical when the break pads or shoes are worn, there is dirty in the calipers or drum preventing the system to be relocated correctly to the right position for its elements (pads, springs, pins, etc), the break pistons are applying force to the pads/shoes but then leaving too ...


1

if it is since you have replaced a hub and bearings, on the same wheel, then all you can do is to get the wheel off and look for a reason. Maybe a new hub wheel studs touches something. Looking now for your hub in Google, and looks like it might be the bolt that holds the hub (3 bolts, red arrow) touching one of a wheel stud (green arrow). Or just any other ...


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As it turns out, the part labelled "10mm" was the correct type. The flats are 11mm across and the thread is M10x1.


4

Usually it's the front brakes that heat up as this is where most braking resistance comes from. Could be a handbrake issue though. If your handbrake did not release completely it could apply a small amount of force, too little for you to notice but enough to heat up the disks.


3

Two lubes are needed to properly lubricate caliper type brakes. Silicone is used on the slider pins and anything that touches rubber. A generous amount that completely coats the pin, hole wall and rubber expansion boot is needed. Be sure to coat the boot lips that fit in the grooves that hold them in place, this act as a sealant. This lube will not swell ...


5

Sounds exactly like worn brake pads to me. Have you checked those recently? Brake pads actually have a wear tab on them like the one pictured below. This is designed to make noise (that chirping sound) before the brake pads are catastrophically low. The noise would be present almost always while driving as the tab is meant to be in constant contact with the ...


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I'd put my money on a failed caliper on the opposite (less worn) side. Consider what happens if a brake caliper fails and doesn't apply any clamping force on the rotor. Your car will certainly brake less well, and in order to stop you're going to have to apply more force. The side that functions is going to dissipate all of the car's energy and gets hotter ...


6

I guess finished means completely outworn. This sounds like a seized caliper on that side, which always brakes a little and so wears the pads. It does not have to brake that much that you notice it, but typical signs are a hotter wheel on the one side compared to the other side after some (especially fast) driving and a wobbling noise which often occurs ...


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(I have used this answer on several questions for chevy truck brake issues) I have a 97 suburban, so I believe things are very similar. I too have replaced lines on this truck and spent hours of time and over a gallon of fluid trying to get it bled correctly. A couple things that I've learned and have helped. Bench bleed the master. Remove the lines, ...


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If bleeding the brakes as normal isn't working you need a scantool with bi directional controls. And do an automated bleed or have the ABS module pulse the bypass modulator valve. This is required on Chevy trucks when replacing the ABS, the master cylinder or when the master cylinder goes empty.


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Some cars allow the air bubble to run out naturally, but it is rare, so you'll need an assistant. Basically you need to apply a pressure on a brake pedal, better if you press it a few times so it becomes harder. Then you need to hold a pedal down and undo the nipple using a 7 or 8 mm spanner. Usually 1/2 of a turn is enough. The nipple is located at the top ...


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I agree with all the recommendations given as certain makes of cars have rear calipers that tend to seize up when not used regularly and only on short journeys at low speeds. I.e. And depending on how quickly it is noticed you may not have to replace the bearings discs(rotors)and pads as we'll.my cars were Audi 100,Honda shuttle,Toyota Prius.At the end of ...



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