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Don't worry about it. I can tell you know nothing about brakes and at your level that is not something you should worry about. You have noticed the front is disc and the back is drum, haven't you?


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Usually, brake imbalance is measured left to right, not front to rear. There is braking bias front to rear, but it is supposed to be that way. Most brake systems are setup with about a 70/30 brake bias front/rear. Most of the braking is done up front so that your rear brakes don't lock up on you. As you brake, weight is transferred forward, which means you ...


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What does this mean? Brake imbalance is caused because one side of the braking pair (front or back axle) is not applying as much power as the other side. What's wrong with my brakes? There are too many answers for this forum. It could be any number of things like a sticking caliper, or a worn pad, or air in the lines. What does the 23% mean? ...


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Types Drilled - commonly seen on motorcycles, the holes assist in cooling, weight reduction and allows water to be moved from the braking surface Grooved/slotted - aids in cooling and cleaning (allows air and dust to move from the inside of the disk to the outside) Drilled and Grooved - as above Vented - allow air in between the braking surfaces to aid in ...


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Different types of discs are designed to either improve the performance, or improve the heat dissipation (preventing 'brake fade' which can occur if they get too hot) Plain solid discs - these are the most basic, as fitted to ordinary cars, they just have a solid block of steel. Perfectly functional for the vast majority of users. Vented discs - these are ...


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I think you have two completely separate issues here (brakes & starting). Since the engine is turning over, the starter is not bad. If there was a vacuum leak causing unmetered air to enter the engine, it would be running differently. It could just be that your MAF or other intake located sensors need cleaning for the starting. As for your brakes, it ...


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This article says it better than I can. http://www.ebay.com/gds/Buying-Brake-Pads-/10000000009117929/g.html There are three types of brake pads, asbestos free organic, semi-metallic, and ceramic They are a mixture of chemicals that is dense, but softer than the rotor. This is to help lengthen the life of the rotor so the pad is worn away and not the ...


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In my experience this is worn brake pads, have them replaced. Sometimes they wear unevenly because of poor alignment, or a bad bushing, or a rock stuck in the caliper. Replace the pads. Inspect the old pads for abnormal wear patterns. Report back. If you aren't sure, take it to a mechanic.


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Some tire pressure sensors are not in the tire, but part of the anti-lock brake system. The wheel speed sensor is used to track the rotation of the tire. When it becomes out of sync with the other three, it shows on the dash as a low tire indication (I don't know what the differential has to be to register, though I bet it is manufacturer dependent). What ...


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If you do not have ABS Brakes, the brakes will lock up when you make an unexpected sharp stop. But it sounds like there is not enough pressure (or vacuum) being made. Since the brakes go to the floor when making a stop and you know that there is not fluid leaking, that means that either the problem is the master cylinder, or the power brake booster. The ...


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Regarding rust on the rotors, I live in a humid part of the US on a steep hill. After a particularly wet spell and leaving the car parked for a couple of days, I can actually feel the rust on my rotors the first time I brake going down the hill. They feel "scratchy." That rust wears off after just a few stops, and you can see that they're shiny and smooth ...


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Torque converters don’t have “Dumps”. I think this person is taking about the pressure relief valve which is relieving hydraulic fluid pressure created by the transmissions hydraulic oil pump. The oil pump is driven direct from the engine. It is independent from the torque converter. The pump is working if the transmission is in any selection. So in N it is ...


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When the car is in D and you start the engine the hydraulic pump in the automatic transmission is not providing fluid pressure until the engine starts. This fluid pressure is used to engage clutches in the transmission to engage first gear or reverse. An automatic transmission does not have gears like a manual transmission which are physically meshed into ...


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The direct answer is that you have to replace your rotors when they start looking like this:


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It's pretty obvious from reading all these replies, that the mechanic shops want you to always replace your rotors, and pay them to do it. Rust on the edges is normal and will happen with new rotors in less than a year, depending on where you live. If the rotors have never been resurfaced, you don't have any deep grooves, and your brakes aren't shuddering ...


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Following Nick's answer... There is sometimes a vacuum line that goes inside the cabin of the vehicle for HVAC controls. This line usually comes from the brake booster. Look at the brake booster's vacuum lines and see if there is one going through the firewall. If there is, try to follow it through the firewall and under the dash to the HVAC controls to ...


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That sounds to me like a vacuum leak. Most cars have servo-assisted brakes (the reason it's much harder to brake if the engine is switched off), which is usually powered by a vacuum line taken off the inlet manifold (so that as the engine sucks in air and fuel, it also sucks air out of the servo). If you look in the engine bay at the point nearest the ...


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Another reason for a squeak when you accelerate would be a busted motor mount, especially on transverse engines. BUT, I would check the brakes and hood stops first, as suggested by the other answers.


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This may be a longshot since it only occurs when accelerating, but it could be the rubber hood stops under the hood squeaking. You could try turning them out one or two rotations to see if that stops the squeak, or add some of those furniture foot pads underneath. This sound is most noticeable over speed-bumps or potholes. I had a squeak in my 2011 ...


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If this is what your rear drum looks like: There probably is a Torx head screw in the "6th hole" (smaller hole located at about 2 o'clock in this photo). All you should have to do is remove the Torx screw and ensure the e-brakes are not engaged. If the e-brakes are too tight, you may need to back them off mechanically. You should be able to find an ...


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If it is anything like the old VW Golf II I ran way back when -and, judging from the photos on the Internet, it does seem identical to all intents and purposes- you will need to take out the split pin and castellated hub nut in order to remove the drum. It does seem a quite fiddly job, though, with the various springs and wedges that need to be set ...


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The only reason it feels more natural to you is because that is the way you do it. It was beat into me from Driver's Education never use your left foot to brake. To me it feels natural to not brake with my left foot. There is a great article I just read about using your left foot to brake from a driving instructor. In the article he basically says things I ...


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I used to do the same thing until I heard that most people (99%+) when encountering a panic situation will press both feet to the floor, resulting in full throttle and full brakes. This will, of course, decrease the effectiveness of the brakes and cause considerable stress on the transmission. I switched.


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I'm not very familiar with the pure brake by wire setups where the brake pedal is completely decoupled from the hydraulics, or the systems where they're using regenerative "load" style brakes. In a electronically controlled system where your pedal is still coupled to the hydraulics, there is an ABS unit that all the brake lines run through. This has motors ...


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So I may be able to answer myself finally. After some more research I found that there may be some confusion in how the systems are named. What is meant by a brake-by-wire system is usually a braking pedal that is mechanically decoupled from the rest of the braking system. This is different from what I actually need to do, because I do not need any pedal ...


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On the systems I am familiar with the ABS module (which is a part under the bonnet through which all of the brake pipes are routed) is able to electronically apply or remove hydraulic pressure to a specific brake line (thus braking or releasing the brake on a specific wheel). These modules are pretty expensive to replace too!


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Sounds like a leak or a burst hose or pipe. Modern braking systems have a safety feature that lets you use some brakes even if a hose burst, so that would explain why only the front brakes seems to take. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydraulic_brake#Component_specifics) the FMVSS Standard 105, 1976; requires the master cylinder is divided internally ...


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It possible that could be air still in the system. In general if it's air you should be able to pump the pedal and have it come up and be firm and hold that level. Air compresses while the brake fluid does not. If you allowed the fluid level in the master cylinder to drop to the point it could draw air in you may have air trapped in the ABS unit. ...


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As brake pads wear, the piston is pushed further and further out of the caliper. Around the edge of the piston is a rubber boot but this sits flush with the caliper so as the piston rests further and further away from this, it can corrode. When fitting new pads, the piston must be pushed back into the caliper and the exposed areas can be awkward to get ...


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It sounds to me like they cocked the piston in the caliper sideways when they collapsed it during the brake job. This could be caused from a worn caliper piston. It may or may not have been their fault, but would be hard to prove. My suggestion is to have the caliper replaced. This should fix the issue. I don't see any way this could be related to the ABS ...


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My '71 FJ40.. The 4 Wheel drums, The mighty Cruiser's weak link, were a disaster, always were, leaky wheel cylinders and so many of them! 5 years ago I went with the JT outfitters disk kit.. front and back. When you do something that is so much more safer..You are not desecrating the mighty Cruiser. I keep mine quite stock (no lift no huge tires no cutting ...



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