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There are a few things this could be. The simplest (and cheapest!) is the brake pad wear sensor - telling you the pads are getting low and need to be replaced. You should be able to tell this by looking at the pads (you may need to take the wheels off to do so) Can you tell if it comes from one particular wheel, or more than one? Is it more of a rumbling or ...


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It sounds as though things might not have been put back together correctly. The caliper is two pieces, one with the piston, the other with the bracket which attaches to the suspension. Ensure these are have free movement. They could be rusted inside. Next, check to ensure you put the right pad in the right place. The one with the "squealer" should be on the ...


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If these were ceramic brake pads, they tend to smoke on first heavy use. Usually, if the shop which puts them in also beds the brakes, you won't see any smoke because they'll already have caused all the smoke. I don't know if it is just the paint on the brake pads which gets burnt up, or if the binding material is fully curing, but I've seen it happen many ...


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If it only occurs after braking, it could be a warped rotor or sticky caliper. If the brake pedal feels like it vibrates when braking then it's most likely warped rotors. If your fuel economy is lower than usual then it's possibly a sticky brake caliper. Another possibility is a bad wheel bearing. Put the car on jack stands and try making the wheels ...


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As noted in the comments, it can be difficult to diagnose from very little information. However, some things worth considering: Disk brakes have one or (more usually) two springs between the brake pads and the calipers: the pads move along these springs when in use. If they have been installed in an incorrect position (or even omitted - have seen that), ...


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I had a similar issue on my truck. What I found was the caliper was not moving correctly and the pad was wearing unevenly. One side of the caliper was stuck, so was causing the issue. For my truck, there is a rod which the caliper attaches to. This rod had rusted and was not allowing free movement. This caused the brake pad to wear unevenly and cause the ...


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Your rear brakes are drums, based on parts availability. My thinking is, some of the hardware on one side of your brakes has failed, but it is only evident when the vehicle is put into reverse. When in reverse, the shoes are pulled out of place, locking one of your wheels in place, and allows the brake cylinder to expand uncontrollably. When you put it back ...


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Low brake pedal and poor brake performance could be the result of any one of the following: Air in the brake lines; Low brake fluid level; A leak in the brake lines or slave cylinders; Defective master cylinder. The reason it is more pronounced when the engine is running is because of the power assist provided by the brake booster, but most likely ...


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Brake rotors do not "warp"; it is a myth. Surface irregularities can occur due to factors such as overheating and can be corrected by resurfacing the rotors on a lathe. It is unlikely that one or two resurfacing operations will affect thermal characteristics but the condition causing the vibration may reoccur within a short period of time. Without other ...


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Turns out the culprit was ultimately the accident I had Christmas Eve. The C-Clip inside the differential holding the rear-passenger-side axle shaft broke during the accident and we hadn't known. This was what was causing the rotor to grind against the pads and caliper bracket. Thanks to all who helped trying to find the needle in the haystack. We were just ...


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Sounds like the brake pads and/or disc brake rotors have become "glazed". There are many types of brake pads and rotors on the market from after market suppliers but not all are the same, each range has there own pros and cons. Typically brake pads require a particular bedding procedure as outlined by the manufacturer, but some pads such as TRW's Cotec range ...


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I was looking at this from an automobile standpoint wondering What the heck is he talking about?? The vast majority of vehicle rotors and drums are made out of grey cast iron!, then went back and reaslized you are asking about motorcycles and ATVs. To that end: Why are OEM parts made of martensitic stainless steel (AISI 4XXX series)? The main reason ...


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Grey cast iron possesses some traits which makes it less desirable than martensitic steel for brake disc applications: it is more brittle, which means it is easier to crack it has very low impact resistance, making it less durable under heavy braking it has less hardness (400 Brinell vs 700 Brinell), so it wears more quickly if left uncoated, it is more ...


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I just read the paperwork that came with my Wagner Disc Pads, which explains: When, Where, & What Chemical Compounds to use During Disc Pad installation, for different types of pads. In General, caliper rails or abutments (where there is metal-to-metal contact with the disc pad plate) should be cleaned and lubricated with Moly Lube. Guide Pins should be ...


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ABS (should) allow for the best stopping traction you can get (in a perfect world) on the road surface regardless of road conditions. That said, you see some caveats in the mix there. I'll try to explain. I say should allow for the best. All ABS systems are not created equal. Some work better than others (though I'm not going to break those out). ABS ...


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If your vehicle has Antilock brakes remove the fuse for the ABS and see if the problem persists. A faulty sensor may cause the ABS to activate when it is not needed. If the issue is resolved with the fuse removed you must diagnose the ABS system. Two common causes for pulsation even after the rotors are replaced are failing to use a torque wrench to tighten ...


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Rust will usually be there to some extent. Rust on the edges does not affect anything. Rust on the surface would probably get ground off during braking if there is any. Grooves in the rotors means you need to grind it flush or replace it. Rotors rarely actually get warped. Usually brake deposits cause uneven surfaces. Many people get scammed into thinking ...


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This is a great question, so let me help. First, I am the owner an auto repair center in New Hampshire and rusted brake rotors are almost an everyday occurrence here. If you live in an area that uses a lot of salt on the roads in the winter, like we do, then this information most likely pertains to you. 99% of the rotors that we have to replace are due to ...



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