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2

If this noise occurs only when the vehicle is in Park, you're probably hearing the park lock getting disengaged. This isn't something to be worried about; perfectly normal.


0

It definitely sounds like your brake light switch isn't activating when it should. I like the list of options presented by rpmerf in his answer. It's definitely something you can tackle if you have a couple of hours to spare. Here's a hands-on approach to figure out what's going on: Push the driver's seat back as far as it will go and put something like ...


1

Above the pedal should be a button, with 2 wires coming out of it. When your pedal is up, the button will be pressed all the way down, as you press the pedal, be button will release. At some point this button turns on your tail lights. I know the one on my truck is adjustable (because I've had to adjust it). In this case, you remove the wires from the ...


2

I'm sure this is normal. There will be a little free play in the linkages to the master cylinder/ brake fluid compressing in the brake lines so the brakes will not be applying until you push the pedal further any way. It reduces the risk of your brake lights flickering while driving if pedal is bumped. But I am not a mechanic. I've driven truck for many ...


3

It sounds as though your brake pads have worn down to the metal Brake pads are considered a consumable in the car industry, much like oil or tires. Brake pads have material that is bound to a metal backing plate. When that material is used up the metal backing plate can begin to grind on the disc or rotor. Once the metal to metal contact begins a groove ...


3

This Question and Answers do an excellent job of explaining the need or not to replace rotors. Rotors are relatively inexpensive and if you want to ensure you brakes are effective then resurfacing the rotors or procuring new ones is a good idea. It's not necessarily about grooves in the rotors or not. The caliper rebuild could be a few hours of flat rate ...


3

1/16" = .0625 inches. That is what is left on rotor #4. There are some calipers that take more labor to clean up and rebuild than it is to buy new, labor costs more than the cost of the new. The condition of the rotors are the determining factor for replacement: 1) Thickness of braking surface(s). They must not be below a certain amount. 2) Grooving: ...


4

No,engine control unit will prevent engine stall if cluch pedal is pressed during engine brake activation. There is a small switch on top of clutch pedal in modern vehicles.This will be used to sense clutch pedal press. Truck control unit senses clutch pedal press and deactivates engine brake. An example can be seen here: When clutch pedal is pressed, ...


1

Drum brakes have the tendency of getting loose every couple of months since unlike disc brakes you will need to apply a lot of force to have proper deceleration and this causes the line to get lose. Even Disc brake lines get loose but the interval is much much greater than drum brakes. If your break gets loose say every hundred kilometres then yo will have ...


3

My first thought is that the trailer brakes are correctly adjusted and the trucks are out of adjustment. Excessive pedal pressure (movement) is required to engage the truck brakes. This over brakes the empty trailer causing the lock-up.


6

The issue most likely is, the trailer was empty. The brakes are designed to work well when the trailer is full. As you can imagine, if the dump was full of loose gravel there'd be quite a load in it. When the trailer is empty, the same amount of force on the brake pedal can cause the brakes to lock up easily. This is something more for the driver to worry ...


-1

I had the same symptoms. I fixed it by rotating the front wheel freely by hand and cleaning the brake pads with a jet of water.


5

The only reason for replacing both at the same time is so that they brake evenly. This is more essential on the front of the vehicle. If you were to stamp on the brakes in an emergency, you wouldn't want the car to swerve into oncoming cars because the brake on one side of your car worked better than the other. Edit - make that 3 reasons if you add ...


5

There are two main reasons: So that both sides of the brake equation are equal. This means they are both starting at the same place again. When you purchase brake pads, they come in sets for both sides. Since you have to purchase new brake pads anyway, you should put them on there or it's a waste of money.


0

In general, if one brake pad wears out, and the other looks new. When the caliper fails it can sometimes make pressure on only one side. Also, if the Brake Pads on one SIDE of the car wear out significantly faster than the other side.


1

A friend of mine just had his ABS unit replaced for this problem. We therorise that the dump valve is stuck open. Because the valve is open the break pressure is exposed to the accumulator. During an ABS stop the accumulator bleeds access pressure into the accumulator. The accumulator is in essence a piston and spring. When the ABS event is over the dump ...


4

You asked It's completely stuck! What should I do? @paulster2 has very salient points I believe through experience there is a very high likelihood that the piston is cocked in the bore of the caliper. My suggestion is that you pop it out of the caliper and inspect the seal and the bore. Many times we do more damage than we undo. A cocked piston is ...


2

POWER BRAKE BOOSTER- with out a doubt. You just might have a hole in the Diaphragm of the Power Brake Booster. Turn the car on and press the brake pedal down to the floor and hold it--- if it goes to floor within 15 seconds or less--, and if you hear a HAUGHT sound when releasing the pedal,-- it's a good chance you need a Brake Booster. When one of your ...


6

Not having brake fluid in your car won't destroy the brakes, but whatever you hit when the brakes don't work just might. :) The brakes in basically every passenger car since the 50's are hydraulically operated. That means when you press the brake pedal you are pressurizing some fluid lines. Those lines run out to the wheels where the added pressure forces ...


3

The huge size is not limited to carbon ceramic, that's just an attribute of most high performance cars' rotors. Carbon ceramic brakes are more expensive because the exotic compound does a much better job of dissipating heat than traditional steel rotors. Because they are able to dissipate heat faster, they do not get "soft" as quickly as other brakes. Soft ...


3

Carbon-metallic Brake Pads If you do have carbon-metallic brake pads, especially high performance ones like you might find on an Audi S4 (although I can't say for sure), the material that they are made out of do tend to be prone to noise which is an artifact that occurs from the manufacturer trying to optimise for braking efficiency. How to Fix Brake Noise ...


-2

In some places, a brake flush might include some sort of additive used to clean the braking system. Its usually a gimmick. Replacing the brake fluid itself is what it means. But flushes can vary between places and most of the time (from experience 99.999999999999%) its a gimmick to get your money.


12

There is no difference between the two. To replace it, you have to flush out the old brake fluid with new fluid. See this answer on how to bleed brake lines for more details.


1

This definitely sounds like some brake pads are worn down to the indicator wear bar. It is supposed to make a screeching noise when this happens. Don't take the car back to the mechanic who said this was normal for an automatic! But do take it to a reputable shop for another opinion. And yes, both points of your question are probably due to the same ...


0

Do you know if it's coming from the front or rear? Also double check your serpentine or v-belts... They may be loose or just need some belt dressing. I know they can sound like that when at idle or when stopping.



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