Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

depends on your car newer cars have electronic controlled transmission which will unlock from D (first gear actuator) if your stopped and not pressing the gas pedal.how ever on most of the cars new and old its a good practice to keep it in N if you stopped. leaving the car on D and pressing the break will just load the transmission and heat the fluids in it ...


0

It seems to me that a dual circuit master cylinder in a single circuit system is not going to be very safe. The plugged circuit will still get fluid (unless you plug the inlet somehow, which would then lead to unhappy/unlubricated seals and a very short life), and will give a pedal that's too firm, potentially affecting the rest of your brake system such ...


1

Teflon tape will not dissolve and should seal the plug, unless there is a larger issue with the plug itself or it's not seating correctly. It could also be, you just don't have the plug tight enough. Secondarily, you did use the correct port on the master? As for Telfon itself, because of its chemical makeup, it is one of the most non-reactive substances ...


0

Don't use teflon tape. It will likely get dissolved or possibly cause contaminants in your brake system. As far as the leaky plug; I am pretty sure the plugs are designed to prevent leaks, are you sure it is seated correctly? I've seen people weld/solder those plugs before.


0

Seems the internal mechanism had failed. In my case, I had the calliper replaced by the dealer (they have proven themselves trusted, competent and pragmatic in the past).


2

Yes, it's serious. It's usually either because your MAF sensor is dirty, or one or more fuel injectors aren't working properly. Check out this link. You should still be able to drive a car that's running too lean, but you should never, under any circumstances drive it fast or put it under heavy load. From the link Causes A code P0171 may mean that one ...


1

Having a lean condition isn't good for the motor. Lean is higher oxygen and lower fuel. Oxygen burns hotter than fuel. Being lean is to have a condition where the fire in your engine is hotter. The results are increased wear on valves and potentially melting the aluminum of the head. The melting is under extreme conditions. You are in a situation where ...


1

It is not normal for a shop to turn the rotors only and not replace the pads. Maybe they thought they were giving you a price break, but now you end up going back to the shop for more work (ie: more labor to be paid). At this point, if they are worth anything as a shop, they will either have to turn the rotor again or replace them, which again, is more ...


2

They might have been trying to save you money, but in the long run it's always best to have rotors and pads replaced at the same time. To explain more, cheep rotors are very common. What makes them cheaper? They are thinner and often softer, which means they wear faster and are easily warped. Resurfacing them is often a waste because the process of ...


-1

Got it resolved (at least mostly). There was air in the system, and roughly 1.5 hours of continuous bleeding pushed it out. Thanks for the answers!


1

It sounds as though you may have more than even two issues going on here. When ever you replace your pads, you should as a minimum burnish the rotors. This means taking the glaze off of them so the new pads can bed (or break-in) correctly. Realistically you should have the turned (or machined) so there is a fresh surface for your new pads to ride on. As an ...


4

This sounds a lot like the rear brakes are dragging. Basically, that means the brakes are always just slightly on, which causes the brakes to heat, and rapid pad wear. Note that hydraulic brakes will fail if they get too hot, due to brake fade, so this can become a serious problem. Checking for brake drag is very easy. Put the transmission in neutral, and ...


1

Most likely they wore out so fast because your rotors were rough. Rough rotors will wear brake pads out real fast. I suggest replacing the rotors. Some people polish their rotors (AKA "turning") but that requires a lath. They shouldn't be too expensive to just replace.


0

I'd look for leaking as the bleed off valve(s) might not have been tightened fully, or air remaining in the system.


1

Whenever you break the brake system open, you need to bleed the entire system. This ensures no air is in the system, nor any contamination. Besides, brakes don't usually get bled enough anyway. Brake fluid should be completely changed every 2 years at a maximum (even I am a failure at keeping up to standard on this). It realistically doesn't take a lot of ...


1

Most people don't do the whole system, but as someone else said the brakes will most likely be spongy and get more so as time goes on. The other thing you have to remember is that even a tiny amount of air will start to breakdown your fluid And most people never change their brake fluid. So it's the start of the system getting slowly worse It's your ...


-1

Is the cable jacketed? If it is it may be broken inside the jacket.


3

Sounds like the the parking brake mechanism that pushes against the parking brake pads has seized, probably due to wear/corrosion/brakedust. I would take it apart and apply a very thin amount of high temp anti-seize to the joints. If this is the case you might also feel the brake shudder at certain speeds too because it should be the same as driving around ...


0

I would have the front wheels bearings checked. A bad bearing can cause sensor misalignment and the ABS to activate. You may also have an issue with the power brake booster. The booster uses engine generated vacuum to assist with pedal effort. A leaking vacuum line may be reducing the vacuum and increase the pedal effort required to stop.


-1

There is No Such thing as coincidence. The brakes felt the same before and after the new pads because the pads were NOT the problem causing the soft pedal. This is likely ABS related issue 99% of the time. To fix it yourself all you need to do is engage the ABS once or twice. On a deserted road or safe place when traveling at 50 -60 mph Slam as hard as you ...


0

Unless you are going to race, the rear brakes are more than adequate whatever type fitted. If you fit a parking brake to a rear disc setup you need either an auxiliary drum or the parking brake will need adjusting very regularly. Jags fitted parking brakes to discs and were a total nuisance. If you drove off without fully releasing the handbrake you had no ...



Top 50 recent answers are included