New answers tagged

0

The correct terminology is "to park the car". This is what I've been taught on an automatic transmission: Come to a complete stop in "D". Put shifter into "N". Apply parking brake, release service brake to let the car rest completely on the parking brake. Put shifter into "P" (most cars do not need the service brake to be applied when going up into "P", ...


0

How to Stop a Car (Correct Way) 1.Press the brake pedal 2.Pull up hand brake 3.Move gear from "D" (or "R") to "P" 4.Release the brake pedal 5.Press the "press to start" button to stop the engine Why? You want the handbrake to hold the car stationary. You don't want to stress the Parking gear, it can fail without warning. Once in a while you'll want to test ...


3

Not sure on your particular vehicle, but most auto-adjusting drum brakes work when applying the foot brake (not parking brake) while the vehicle is in reverse, so whenever you back out of a parking space and hit the foot brake, the brakes adjust. EDIT: There is a device within the braking assembly which looks like this: There is a lever arm attached to ...


-1

How would stop at traffic lights? Press the brake pedal Apply the parking brake Release the brake pedal All you're doing when stopping "completely" is adding to the end of this sequence: Put the transmission in "P" Push the button to stop the engine


0

Pedal feel is always softer until the pads have bedded into the rotors properly. Make sure that you follow a proper bed-in procedure before deciding that you have a problem.


4

You may not need do it one way or another, but the correct habit would be to stop and then Park the vehicle before turning it off. Why? Well, you're not doing any damage making the selection on the gearbox if the engine is running. You set the vehicle's controls appropraitely and the last thing you do is turn it off. Consider the opposite, do you put the ...


1

If the car is fully stopped then either way is fine. Neither will cause damage to your car. I however would recommend getting into the habit putting it into park first then cutting the engine because if you cut the engine first you may forget to put it in park later. If it is still in drive the car could potentially roll away.


4

You may not have a choice. On many "button cars" you cannot just kill the engine while the transmission is still in gear. This is a safety feature to prevent you from bumping it and turning off the engine on the highway by accident. You really don't need to change how you stopped the car from when you had keys, just push the button instead of turning the ...


0

If the brakes are always spongy, it is air bubbles. If the brakes are only spongy when hot, it is moisture.


3

Since it is a modified truck, obviously new brake lines and an old Master Cylinder, the answer is obvious. The truck modifier purchased standard-length brake lines, and used the loops to take up excess length, rather than cut off the flared ends and re-flare them. How do I know this? I've done it myself.


1

With trucks whether they are tandem trailer (A or B trains depending on the size of trailers) or not have air brakes. Sometimes they develop leaks in the air lines. When the pressure drops below a certain value the trailer brakes lock up suddenly. I notice you didn't mention smoke from the front trailer. I suspect it was normal stop but the rear trailer had ...


18

They are often times referred to as service loops. Their purpose is to allow some flexibility in the event the master cylinder has to be replaced, or a fitting needs to be repaired. It makes it easier to align the fittings without crossthreading them. AS @Fred Wilson has stated there is flexing. The brakelines will typically be anchored to the frame. The ...


12

It is about vibration. The master cylinder and brake booster are mounted to the firewall; the firewall flexes. They move up and down significantly as the body jerks up and down when driven over bumps. This solution is cheaper to implement than changes to the firewall. It would be challenging to build a firewall rigid enough to support that weight.


1

As stated prior, if the rotors weren't machined or lightly surfaced when the pads were changed, that will give you a spongy feel as you are not stopping as effectively and takes more effort to slow down. With new rotors and pads, the machine marks on the rotors help to break in the rotors and pads together. Once broken in, they will work well as they wear ...


1

If you have fluid in the brake reservoir, and have no pedal, you have a failed master cylinder. The piston that moves when you step on the brake pedal has o-ring seals that if they fail, can allow fluid to pass by them and not apply pressure to the brakes. All brake systems today have a dual circuit system where if you loss pressure to a wheel (caliper, ...


4

If your brake pedal went to the floor it means that there was not enough hydraulic pressure to apply the brake. If they were working fine before and never felt squishy then your master cylinder has probably gone out and needs to be replaced. Alternatively you may have a lot of air in the lines, enough that the pressure applied by the brake was not enough to ...


0

You need to bleed the brakes, you will have an air pocket in the system. As you stand on the pedal, the system is compressing the air pocket instead of the fluid, hence the brakes won't actuate. Here's a popular mechanics article on how you can do this yourself, or you can take it to a mechanic and they can do it pretty quickly and cheaply for you. This ...


0

That'll work metal to metal - but be careful that you don't get it on any rubber, as the rubber may swell (depends on the type of rubber, of course, but I'd play safe)


3

My suggestion would be to chase the wiring directly rather than trying to identify all the parts of a system your mechanic did not even identify for you. If possible, find an electrical diagram for the car online. A Google search for 2001 volvo v70 wiring diagram turned up many images of wiring diagrams that should be very helpful. To trace this back, ...


0

I think its all down to the silicone paste. For brakes you would normally used copperslip. A copper based anti seize paste. It has a much higher tolerance for heat. I would remove the pads and use the correct compound rather than the silicone stuff. Inspect the pads for damage or the silicone getting on to the friction material. Something like this ...


0

Ok, I managed to open the Brake Bleeder Screw and replace them. I decided to try the penetrating oils before the heat option. I found the following data from this link. Penetrating oil ..... Average load None ..................... 516 pounds WD-40 .................. 238 pounds PB Blaster ............. 214 pounds Liquid Wrench ..... 127 pounds Kano ...


5

These appear to be anti-squeal/anti-rattle shims. These are now built into the brake pads instead of coming separately. Don't worry about them.


0

Click sound on first stop could be floating calipers, which are probably operating as designed. When you back up they move back into position and click when driven. Again, this is normal behaviour.


1

TBH I've never seen teflon tape on brake bleeder screws or any brake line fittings. It seems kind of stupid to try especially in a professional environment where you're open to litigation and possibly criminal charges if the tape fails and someone dies.


2

The smell is certainly the brake pads bedding in, it's pretty normal. As is the brake dust - you can upgrade to lower dust pads, but you'll find that it's a common thing amongst nose-heavy cars with disc brakes.


6

If these are ceramic brakes, it's completely normal. I'm not sure why it happens, but I've seen it happen on almost every set of ceramic brakes which I've installed. The smoking will usually only happen once when they get hot enough, then they are basically "cured" and will be golden for the life of them. In other words, this should be nothing to worry ...


1

Use the correct Master Cylinder, they sill make them for your model. Its not really a 2 line (dual line MC), it is manufactured to fit different models, use the correct line out for your model so you do not have to bend stock the line. If this is what you have tighten the plug more using a 6 point socket to stop the leak. You can buy one at this site


3

Two points; Teflon tape is not a sealant. It lubricates the threads, so that you can insert the threaded part deeper, and as a side-effect it fills small gaps - but it was never designed as a sealant. Brake fluid dissolves/degrades PTFE. Try Permatex instead, if you want to go this route. If you think you need a seal, you should fix the problem rather ...


2

I have a 97 suburban. I am not sure how similar things are. I have replaced lines/hoses/calipers/wheel cylinders on this truck and spent hours of time and over a gallon of fluid trying to get it bled correctly. A couple things that I've learned and have helped. If the master ran dry, be sure to bench bleed the master and ABS. Remove the lines, install ...


7

If you've changed the calipers and the pedal now goes all the way to the floor, chances are that you've introduced air into the system whilst you had the calipers off. To fix this, you need to "bleed" the braking system. At each brake caliper / wheel cylinder there is a bleed nipple or bleed screw. The basic procedure is to start at the wheel furthest ...


0

Well, @paulster2 gets it right again. 2 bad calipers in a row. Got a different caliper from another parts store and put it on and it is working great today. My ultimate diagnostic test in determining that it had to be a faulty caliper was this: Once I drove the truck around and got the brake nice and tight, I jacked it up, pulled the wheel off, and opened ...


0

Empty and change your diff fluid, gearbox fluid and transfer case fluid. When the fluids are out and in the pan, run a magnet through each to see if you can collect any metal pieces. Being an evo, I'd be suspecting either diff or transfer case as the first thing to look at. When the teeth in the gears and clutch packs inside the diffs start to fail, they ...


3

This is my method of last resort when lube, heat, brute force failed. Loosen all the lug nuts 2-3 turns, alternate between forward and reverse while accelerating 2 or 3 feet in each direction. Hit the brakes hard between each direction change. Have an observer watch for the wheel to move. Jack up the vehicle remove the lug nuts and try the methods that ...


3

The easiest way to take care of this which I've found is to: Jack up and secure the vehicle (or wheel) Take all lug nuts off Sit on your butt in front of the offending wheel With your feet, pound alternately from one side to the other until the wheel comes loose This is a process, which can take some time. I've found this works the fastest in getting a ...


3

All I can suggest it to soak the rim with a quality Rust Penetrate, squirt it into the lug nut holes with the lug nuts removed, do this several times a day over a few days, rotate the wheel 180 degrees each time right before you soak it, let the penetrate do the work. Once it has soaked a couple of days, get someone with a big foot and large leg to kick the ...


0

I see absolutely no shelf life issue here. But with that said... Here's a thought. Storage costs money. You need garage and shelves and boxes and marking of boxes and ladders to get to the boxes in the back, and remembering what you did buy (out of sight is out of mind.) Place a dollar value on the storage and compare that to the potential cost savings. ...


2

Ideally you'd want to store pads and rotors packed up and in a dry place. Moreover you'd want to avoid stacking heavy stuff on rotors. In general I would keep them flat. This is to avoid warping. Now, when mounted pads and rotors are exposed to atmospheric agents, cold, extremely hot temperatures when braking, salt, grit, rust, etc. It is therefore safe to ...


7

I see no problem with this Brake pads won't degrade with exposure to oxygen like steel with though. Brake discs have a lot of iron in them and have a tendency to rust. There is coating on them that prevents rust. You could wipe them down with a bit oil and wrap them to prevent oxidation but in the end, even some rust on brake rotors is not terrible. ...


1

If the engine is running, not only is this unsafe (front axles can spin, hitting your hands if the front is in the air or moving off the stands if the rear is up), but it drastically changes the pressure at which the fluid will shoot out of the calipers and shrink the time to close the bleeder screw before the pedal hits the floor.


5

It seems as though the plunger in the master cylinder isn't retracting after use Occasionally when motorcycles are stored you can run into this problem. Older brake fluid along with a bit of moisture and oxygen can contribute to a buildup of material inside the master cylinder bore where the plunger goes. After pulling the brake once the plunger sticks ...


6

A knocking noise when braking (or during less noticeable maneuvers) can be attributed to worn front suspension parts - especially control arm bushings. The image below is from some random heavily worn lower control arm bushings. As you can see, the rubber wears out and the connector in the middle is free to wiggle and knock around. Using your brakes puts ...


2

I think you are misunderstanding the reading on the stick. The Hot mark doesn't mean the fluid is overly hot... That is the full mark when the fluid is hot (which is normal). Transmissions are supposed to be checked after the engine is up to temperature and has been driving a while.


0

It is unlikely to be caused by a rotten brake dust shield, if the knocking is repetitive with a frequency that alters with speed, that would suggest that it's source is something that is rotating. Perhaps a badly warped brake disk?


2

Reading hot on the transmission dipstick after driving is normal. As to the ABS light they could of damaged wiring while doing the brakes but it's unlikely. Reading ABS codes requires a scantool capable of talking to the ABS computer.


1

I've had the same problem on a 2006 Toyota Camry. In my particular case, the problem was made worse because the last person to have bled the brakes over-tightened the valve so far that he or she rounded the nut portion of the bleeder valve. I couldn't get a wrench on it reliably as a result. Never use a 12-sided box wrench or gear wrench or open wrench on ...


3

It is just as @Ben stated ... it will have a double inverted flare with metric threads. Look it up online and find the exact part (brake line) to match. It will save you a bunch of time and a whole lot of agony. I'd look it up for you, but the Getz was not marketed in the US as any model. Most manufacturers sell the individual, pre-bent brake lines. You can ...


5

Getting them to break loose is the biggest challenge. I use a good penetrate, soak them several times over 3-4 days, use brake line wrenches to turn the nuts to prevent rounding the brake line nuts, as they are soft steel. Cheap brake line wrenches will round the nuts, buy good quality wrenches of the proper size, metric or american. Use a wrench on the ...


0

I keep my cars (Toyotas) for way over 10 years and over 100,000 miles, so my answer does not pertain to relatively new autos with low mileage. With such older vehicles, I take care with preventive maintenance. With 50 years and millions of miles of driving, I have had 3 times when my travel has been stopped dead. Two of those three were due to sticking ...


2

I have seen this behavior with a bad ehcu but is rare, they have an internal valve for each wheel, but it does happen. Internal collapsed brake hose I have seen many times, also sticking calipers use to be common but I hardly see that anymore since they went back to steel pistons. Steel piston calipers can do this but requires a lot of internal corrosion on ...


2

After driving, place your hand on your rims. If any of them feel hot to the touch then you most likely have a seized brake cylinder or caliper. Once you have your rim off, look at the brake drum or rotor and look for discoloration other than the rusty color. If it looks almost purple like where the brake shoes or pads come into contact, then you have had ...



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