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43

The decision to replace is largely based on the thickness. The repair manual should tell you the minimum thickness, below which you should replace the rotors when doing the repair. Use a pair of calipers and measure the rotor thickness, if you're below this number you need to replace the rotors. You may also wish to replace the rotors if you have ...


33

Yes. One of your brake pads on the caliper side of the brakes had been worn so far down it popped out of place. Now you are stopping using the caliper piston against the brake rotor. You will now have to not only get the brake pads and rotors replaced, but the caliper as well. If you cannot fix this yourself, you should get the vehicle towed to a repair ...


20

If the manual is saying small amounts of DOT3 can be used, what they are most likely saying is if you find yourself with low brake fluid and only DOT3 is available, it is better to use that than to not have brake fluid. Once you get back home though you need to get the recommended DOT4 back in the system by bleeding the system and filling with DOT4. As ...


18

They are often times referred to as service loops. Their purpose is to allow some flexibility in the event the master cylinder has to be replaced, or a fitting needs to be repaired. It makes it easier to align the fittings without crossthreading them. AS @Fred Wilson has stated there is flexing. The brakelines will typically be anchored to the frame. The ...


17

It is about vibration. The master cylinder and brake booster are mounted to the firewall; the firewall flexes. They move up and down significantly as the body jerks up and down when driven over bumps. This solution is cheaper to implement than changes to the firewall. It would be challenging to build a firewall rigid enough to support that weight.


16

There are three cases that cause brake rotors to need to be resurfaced/turned and/or replaced. Gouging of the rotor by the brake pad holding mechanism (the pad were rubbed completely away and the metal holding the pad start digging into the rotor) Warping of the rotor from extreme use (rotor gets too hot and warps upon cooling) The rotor itself wears down ...


15

For general driving, you can leave the car in drive. It doesn't damage the transmission leaving it in drive while stationary at the lights - although you don't want to be doing silly things like revving the engine while holding the brakes on. In an automatic car, you don't really use neutral. It is a step on the way to selecting Park, which means that the ...


15

I would recommend you get slotted, but not drilled rotors. Regular rotors will work fine for typical track use. What is more important is the type of brake pad you purchase to go with your disks. The reason I suggest not getting drilled rotors is, they have a tendency to crack at the holes due to stress risers. They will not last as long as you'd like them ...


14

There are a number of ways this can be done. It can range from a two person job, with on one the pedal and the other at the bleed nipple, to a one man job where the new fluid is forced through the system under external pressure. For DIY purposes the most common is the two man (person?) way. Person A is at the nipple, which has a hose attached and the other ...


14

DOT4 brake fluid has a higher boiling point than DOT3, making the fluid less likely to boil. Using cheaper, lower-grade fluid increases the chances of your brakes failing in situations where they build up lots of heat, e.g., driving down a mountain on a twisty road. More information: http://www.carbibles.com/brake_bible_pg2.html


14

Drum brakes are cheaper to manufacture than disc brakes, because there are fewer moving parts and because in the rear the parking brake (which often works by a drum-and-shoe mechanism even on four-wheel-disc-equipped cars) can share a drum with the "regular" brakes. All other things being equal, discs work better than drums, especially in wet conditions. ...


14

The sequence matters. If you have a lot of air right after your master cylinder for whatever reason, that air can travel to any point in the system. At some point, the hydraulic line attached to the master cylinder will branch to each of the four wheels. As you pump the brakes, the air will propagate down the hydraulic line, and randomly go down one of the ...


13

tl,dr: The short answer is no, with caveats. The longer answer starts with "well, you can kill your car with anything if you try hard enough." Let's use specific examples of when you should use your transmission for engine braking: Waimea Canyon or Mount Washington. In either case, you are descending thousands of vertical feet at significant grades. If ...


13

If it has been driving fine since then, all you have probably done is worn the brake pads down. Not fatal - but check when you pull the handbrake on that it is solidly holding the car stationary. If you notice vibration, then I'd worry about pads/disks being warped or damaged. You may find though that you need the handbrake cable to be tightened, as it may ...


13

tl;dr: We do. It's just expensive. One of the differences between electric and chemical energy motors is that the electric systems make it much more convenient to capture and retain energy (e.g., a battery). All you need to do is use induction to create an electric current right there at the wheel while braking. Point that current at that battery and you've ...


13

Checked EBC website FAQ There was a question on cross drilled rotors, that were represented as genuine EBC brand. Here is the last sentence of their reply: If you have any doubts that you are being supplied genuine EBC Brakes products contact EBC Brakes immediately for an opinion on warranty@ebcbrakes.com I would recommend sending your concerns, ...


12

Consider the possibility that the brakes make the noise at all speeds but that higher speeds mask it. The most likely cause is worn pads/shoes. You should check their remaining thickness against the manufacturer's recommended minimum. (Look in a repair manual if you have one, or search the Web.) Check the thickness of the brake rotors, too. If the car has ...


12

Improper wheel nut torque, use a torque wrench, or an impact wrench with torque sticks to put on the wheels. Rapid cooling such as running through water with the brakes hot is also suppose to cause it. Cheap pads, they breakdown under heat and leave deposits on the rotor surface. Ball joints should not cause the rotors to warp. Example of Torque sticks ...


12

The braking surfaces of a rotor require precision machining. The tolerances are in the .002" range. You would never come close without a quality lathe. Each manufacturer also has specifications for minimum total thickness, side to side variance for vented rotors, the smoothness of the finish and run-out which is the difference between the highest and lowest ...


12

The piston is hold in place by a rubber-gasket. The piston does not slide in this gasket, instead, they stick together. So, when the brake is activated and the piston moves towards the disk, the gasket deforms a little to allow this movement without sliding. When the brake is released, the gasket moves to its original shape and retracts the piston. ...


12

There is no difference between the two. To replace it, you have to flush out the old brake fluid with new fluid. See this answer on how to bleed brake lines for more details.


12

I can see two differences: The EBC website shows a 3D view of the brake pads, which show a different shape for the black region. This may be because you have a different brake pad shape from the one in the 3D view. The "brake-in coating" tri-color tone also seems like it's missing from your images. However, it's hard to conclude anything based on the ...


11

The main purpose of neutral on an automatic is for towing or pushing the car. Obviously you can't push it with the transmission in park, and if you tow it with the transmission in gear or in park and the drive wheels are in contact with the ground, you'll ruin your transmission or your tires or both. I'm sure there are some other uses too, but they're ...


11

If you lost all (or almost all) of your brake fluid, you have a leak. Check all of your calipers (assuming disk brakes all around) to see if there is a leak at the wheels. If none there, check the soft lines (rubber lines at the wheel) for leaks. If no leaks there, check around the master cylinder and anti-lock brake unit for leaks from the lines. If you do ...


11

Generally you don't replace calipers in pairs, only replace the damaged side. With that being said you may still not need to replace the caliper to solve your problem depending on the design. Their may be a kit that comes with new sleeves, o-rings, and grease. Replacing those will solve the problem, but again it depends on make, model, year.


11

It sounds like the brake pads have either completely worn through or otherwise failed, your car is not safe to drive at all. In this case you will certainly need new pads on both sides and possibly new rotors (disks) if they have been scored by metal/metal contact. Depending on exactly what has failed the calipers and pistons may be ok but they need to ...


11

If you are replacing the brake fluid for example, bleed the corner farthest from the master cylinder first. Then the next farthest, etc, etc till you have done all four. If you're just bleeding air out of the system, that's the order as well. Generally the master cylinder is on the firewall on the drivers side, so the passenger side rear would be first, ...


11

I'm going to assume you have a very good reason for not taking the other car out of the garage to give yourself more room... People replace either the front or rear brakes together because they are "on the same axle" and replacing one side doesn't make sense because both sides should wear at the same rate. Replacing one side could make the car pull to one ...


10

It's not a concern really other than being annoying if in fact the brakes are new. It's not a difficult fix; just putting disk brake quite on the back of the pads should solve the problem. It should have been done when they did the brake job, so I would take it back to the dealer where you bought it and ask them to fix it. At my place it would be done at no ...


10

Wow, I'm in the minority here. It is my firm belief that you should have your rotors turned with every brake pad/shoe replacement! If you do not do this everything will work perfectly fine, until you apply the brakes then if your brake rotors/drums were glazed, heavily scored or worn out of parallel to the new brake pad your will stopping distance WILL be ...



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