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Pads and rotors should be considered a consumerable item. Forget about re-grinding the rotors. If you are on to your second set of pads on your rotors, drag your thumb nail across their surface. If your nail can feel any grooving or catching, change the rotors and the pads.


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Had the same problem with my bike took it to the local mechanic Turns out the break pads had worn out a lot and needed replacement and the brake piston seal had been overextended so the seal was damaged too


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Yes you should. The price of new pads (in most cases) is small $$. This will get you fresh mating surfaces on both sides. If you don't, you run the risk of screwing up your fresh cut on the old rotors. Don't forget to correctly bed the new brakes after installation or you run the risk of being back at square one.


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Sounds like you just had a speed sensor go bad, Just happens sometimes. It happened to me on my suburban. it caused my front passenger brake caliper to grab and release realy fast.


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If your rotors' wear surfaces are still smooth & flat & true, then keep the rotors and replace the pads alone. The dealer wants to replace the rotors because doing so eliminates one potential source of liability for them - the more they replace, the less their potential liability. If the wear surfaces are NOT still good, then they should be measured ...


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Replacing rotors or drums every other time you replace the pads/shoes is crazy. For most daily drivers, that would be every year or every 2 years. Unless the vehicle is being used for something like a delivery service (IE, LOTS of miles with TONS and TONS of stops), there is no reason not to expect 50K-100K or even more from a pair of even stock or ...


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Will, you have DISK brakes, correct? And the calipers are off, so the park brake now has nothing at all to do with things, your rotors are just rusted onto the hubs. There are two things you can do, and you'll probably have to do both of them. First, find TWO ball-peen or similar hammers and a pair of protective glasses. Screw all the lug nuts on for ...


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Like the previous answer, the handbrake adjusment MUST BE fully wound back off. The rotors should have two threaded holes in them which allow a couple of buckshee bolts to be passed through them and bottom on the drive shaft. By tightening them equally and progressively it shoud allow the rotor to 'wiggle' off. But have that penetrating fluid and that good ...


1

Did you back the emergency brake off, or maybe you have them on? If your e-brake is not at issue ... Spray the center section and the stud areas down with PB-Blaster or another very good rust penetrant. Let it sit for several hours. Then beat the heck out of it with a rubber mallet from the backside. What you are looking for is just a little movement on one ...


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Brake pad and discs are a well practised bread and butter job. Your problem can only be because of: Wrong or defective parts, incorrect fitting damage such as not using a caliper piston retraction tool, incorrect re-assembly of shims and bolts and anti-rattle springs, previous damage or mis-alignment being masked by the old pad wear, a foreign body ...


3

I've done countless brake jobs at the shop I worked at; without hearing/seeing the car here are some things that can cause noise/pulsating: Non-burnished brakes - like others have stated after putting fresh pads and rotors on a car you need to 'break them in.' I worked in a shop for a while and we didn't always do everything by the book, but when putting ...


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Paul, I'd like you to open up those brakes again and examine the rotors very carefully. I just finished a conversation with a fella who described symptoms identical to yours. I walked him through a range of troubleshooting steps until finally I was nearly convinced that he had a cracked CV joint boot and he needed to replace an axle shaft when he suddenly ...


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More than likely you didn't bed your brakes correctly. If you read this from Centric Parts, you find out exactly what I'm talking about. The specific part I'm talking about is the portion on an even transfer layer: Note the emphasis on the word even, as uneven pad deposits on the rotor face are the number one, and almost exclusive cause of brake judder ...


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I can't say for sure without a photo but in many cases it is rust on the hub. Many rotors have an extra hole machined in the rotor. It is usually located between two of the stud holes. I am not sure of why it is there, perhaps to help balance the rotor or to aid in the machining process. What can occur is that a small amount of rust will form on the hub ...



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