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Types Drilled - commonly seen on motorcycles, the holes assist in cooling, weight reduction and allows water to be moved from the braking surface Grooved/slotted - aids in cooling and cleaning (allows air and dust to move from the inside of the disk to the outside) Drilled and Grooved - as above Vented - allow air in between the braking surfaces to aid in ...


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Different types of discs are designed to either improve the performance, or improve the heat dissipation (preventing 'brake fade' which can occur if they get too hot) Plain solid discs - these are the most basic, as fitted to ordinary cars, they just have a solid block of steel. Perfectly functional for the vast majority of users. Vented discs - these are ...


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This article says it better than I can. http://www.ebay.com/gds/Buying-Brake-Pads-/10000000009117929/g.html There are three types of brake pads, asbestos free organic, semi-metallic, and ceramic They are a mixture of chemicals that is dense, but softer than the rotor. This is to help lengthen the life of the rotor so the pad is worn away and not the ...


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I would bet the problem is not that the rotors are warped (this really doesn't happen all that often). The problem is probably that after hard braking and then a sudden stop without release for a period of time, there is a small buildup of brake friction material which has embedded itself upon the surface of the rotor. This gives you a pulsating feeling when ...


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Yes, the front wheel should spin more freely than the rear, for as you note, there is less on it to drag. As Steve says, a non-flat rotor would result in oscillation or pulsing when braking, which should be pretty obvious on a bike. You can check it for flatness using a dial gauge (or run-out gauge). My suspects would be a sticking caliper, or a failing ...


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Regarding rust on the rotors, I live in a humid part of the US on a steep hill. After a particularly wet spell and leaving the car parked for a couple of days, I can actually feel the rust on my rotors the first time I brake going down the hill. They feel "scratchy." That rust wears off after just a few stops, and you can see that they're shiny and smooth ...


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I'm a retired mechanic, I used to work on private car's and some commercial vehicles. The principal of disc brakes is the same although details might differ between car and m/cycle. Don't even attempt any brake work unless you are competent and have the right tools. You mentioned the possibility of a distorted rotor. Can you feel anything untoward when ...


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The direct answer is that you have to replace your rotors when they start looking like this:


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It's pretty obvious from reading all these replies, that the mechanic shops want you to always replace your rotors, and pay them to do it. Rust on the edges is normal and will happen with new rotors in less than a year, depending on where you live. If the rotors have never been resurfaced, you don't have any deep grooves, and your brakes aren't shuddering ...


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Exactly what @Movemorecommentslinktotop said in his comment ... if the rear rotors, there is a second braking surface inside the rotor "hat" which is for the e-brakes. If you haven't backed these shoes off or if you have the e-brake on, you'll never get these off. The front brakes may be rusted around the hub and are not releasing. They can become "space ...



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