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That'll work metal to metal - but be careful that you don't get it on any rubber, as the rubber may swell (depends on the type of rubber, of course, but I'd play safe)


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I think its all down to the silicone paste. For brakes you would normally used copperslip. A copper based anti seize paste. It has a much higher tolerance for heat. I would remove the pads and use the correct compound rather than the silicone stuff. Inspect the pads for damage or the silicone getting on to the friction material. Something like this ...


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Well, @paulster2 gets it right again. 2 bad calipers in a row. Got a different caliper from another parts store and put it on and it is working great today. My ultimate diagnostic test in determining that it had to be a faulty caliper was this: Once I drove the truck around and got the brake nice and tight, I jacked it up, pulled the wheel off, and opened ...


3

This is my method of last resort when lube, heat, brute force failed. Loosen all the lug nuts 2-3 turns, alternate between forward and reverse while accelerating 2 or 3 feet in each direction. Hit the brakes hard between each direction change. Have an observer watch for the wheel to move. Jack up the vehicle remove the lug nuts and try the methods that ...


3

The easiest way to take care of this which I've found is to: Jack up and secure the vehicle (or wheel) Take all lug nuts off Sit on your butt in front of the offending wheel With your feet, pound alternately from one side to the other until the wheel comes loose This is a process, which can take some time. I've found this works the fastest in getting a ...


3

All I can suggest it to soak the rim with a quality Rust Penetrate, squirt it into the lug nut holes with the lug nuts removed, do this several times a day over a few days, rotate the wheel 180 degrees each time right before you soak it, let the penetrate do the work. Once it has soaked a couple of days, get someone with a big foot and large leg to kick the ...


2

I have seen this behavior with a bad ehcu but is rare, they have an internal valve for each wheel, but it does happen. Internal collapsed brake hose I have seen many times, also sticking calipers use to be common but I hardly see that anymore since they went back to steel pistons. Steel piston calipers can do this but requires a lot of internal corrosion on ...


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I change the rotors and pads at the same time. I like the knowledge that my brake parts have the same service life. I live in a harsh climate that takes a toll on all parts that are close to the ground (snow,ice,salt, sand,rain and Lord knows what) attacking them. Safety is always worth a few extra bucks.


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This symptom is a classic for lug nuts coming lose while you are driving. When lug nuts come lose the wheel will vibrate and after a time, as other lugs on that wheel come lose, it will scare you to death. Check all the wheels for lose lugs as it is hard to identify the correct rim with the lose lugs. Sadly, I know this by experience.


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There are three common ways for disc brakes to stick, and what you were experiencing is definitely symptomatic of stuck brakes. The caliper slides might be rusted The piston in the caliper is getting crooked in the bore and not retracting The brake hose has collapsed internally and is not releasing pressure The easiest thing to inspect is the pins, but ...


3

3 ways: Drive the vehicle and do both light braking from 25mph then hard braking from 55mph, if the brake pedal pulses up and down or the steering wheel shakes or vibrates, then you have at least one warped rotor. If stops are smooth and relatively noise free then go to #2 below. Pull the rotors and do a visual inspection, look for cracks (even small ones) ...



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