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6

It is not normal for the front end to go out of alignment when getting the front rotors turned, but it would not be unheard of. Any time you mess with the front end of the vehicle you run the risk of needing an alignment. This is not something you should expect to be done, though. Something which may be happening is you may have a caliper which is ...


6

Paulster2 offers sound advice when he says the pads need to be replaced sooner rather than later. I recently took a picture when I performed a brake pad swap that offers a stark comparison of what you could be missing out on. The new pads for my BMW measured 10mm at the thickest part. The old pads were roughly 2mm, thin enough to cause my brake pad wear ...


5

2mm of friction material is not much. I would suggest you change the pads as they have. They may last a bit longer, but at what point are they going to go metal-on-metal and greatly reduce your stopping ability? At any point, the last little bit may flake off and cause this situation. It could run for 5000 miles or it could last 5 miles? Are you willing to ...


4

Not sure on a bike, but if this was a car I would tell you that the shop didn't burnish or set in the pads after the brake job, or failed to turn the rotors, or the rotors were turned improperly. Based on the number of miles you have driven without improvement I am leaning toward the rotors not being turned, or turned incorrectly. As Paulster2 pointed out ...


4

More than likely you didn't bed your brakes correctly. If you read this from Centric Parts, you find out exactly what I'm talking about. The specific part I'm talking about is the portion on an even transfer layer: Note the emphasis on the word even, as uneven pad deposits on the rotor face are the number one, and almost exclusive cause of brake judder ...


4

This appears to be a dust shield (or sometimes called a backing plate) for the rotor on the disk brake system. It would cover the back side of the rotor. You would be able to see it if you got under the car and looked at the rotor from the back side. I'm not positive about this, though, as this piece is pretty mangled.


4

I've done countless brake jobs at the shop I worked at; without hearing/seeing the car here are some things that can cause noise/pulsating: Non-burnished brakes - like others have stated after putting fresh pads and rotors on a car you need to 'break them in.' I worked in a shop for a while and we didn't always do everything by the book, but when putting ...


3

Brake wear does not always depend on mileage - for example a car used entirely in city stop-start traffic will wear out it's brakes quicker than one used entirely on highways, simply because the brakes are used a lot more per mile travelled. It seems to be quite an emotive subject, with some people saying you should replace the discs (rotors) every time you ...


3

The brake hydraulic system might have an air bubble in the piping or cylinder unit. You may need to "bleed" the system by pumping the brake handle until firm, holding the handle down and opening the hydraulic nipple (liquid and air should spray out), then close the nipple and repeat if necessary. Remember that faulty brakes could cost you in the end so make ...


2

The mechanic is right and wrong. You may not have to replace them, but should at least have the rotors resurfaced, or turned. This restores the braking surface for the new pads to have compatible surface. Putting new pads on used rotors is not advised and will prematurely wear the pads. The caveat is if the rotors are too thin and can not be turned, they ...


2

Unless the rotor shows obvious signs of damage there is no way to tell by a photo. The only way to be sure is to measure the rotor with a micrometer. The most accurate method is with a micrometer specifically designed to measure rotors. The contact areas of the micrometer are pointed, this allows measurement at the base of any grooves. After the smallest ...


2

I found what was causing the noise. There is a small metal plate, roughly sized and shaped like a one of those little wooden ice cream spoons that come with a Dixie cup. It is positioned suspending from the bottom of the hub parallel to the back of the rotor. On both sides of the car it was touching the rotor causing the noise. On the driver side the ...


2

New disc brake pads should feel snappy and responsive. If the line is free of bubbles, and the rotor is free of grease, the next step is to check that the brake calipers are clean and slide smoothly, that the brake pedal is properly lubricated and not sticking, and that the master cylinder is sliding freely. Sometimes a shot of chain lube right into the ...


2

Yes you should. The price of new pads (in most cases) is small $$. This will get you fresh mating surfaces on both sides. If you don't, you run the risk of screwing up your fresh cut on the old rotors. Don't forget to correctly bed the new brakes after installation or you run the risk of being back at square one.


2

WD-40 is not brake cleaner. I would take it apart and clean it with the appropriate stuff. Also can you move your caliper back and forth? It should be able to "float" or slide back and forth a little on the pins. If it's not moving, you could have a pad that's dragging and making constant contact (as well as noise) on the rotor.


2

If you want it to look nice/new/fresh/exciting, you will not be able to get it this way without removing the wheel. There is just no way of completely cleaning/coating the caliper without removing the wheel. Your best bet to get them cleaned up is to: Remove the wheel Pull the caliper from it's mount Remove the pads (keeping them in positional order for ...


2

One of the factors that influence the cost of replacement rotors is mass. Basically we are talking weight. Over the last couple of decades rotors have gotten cheaper and lighter. The rotor is lighter because it has less material. I buy the heaviest rotors I can get the specs on. This was actually part of a marketing campaign by NAPA several years ago. They ...


2

Where is the rust at? If it is on the outer edges and/or on the hat area (part in the center where the brake pad does not ride), there's probably absolutely nothing wrong with the brake rotor in the first place. As long as the wear area where the pad does it's business is clear, you have no issues. Only brake rotors which have been treated with some type of ...


1

If it's light enough that it'll scrape off with a toothbrush then it'll be scrubbed off by the pads the first time you use the brakes - i.e. don't worry about it. It's quite normal on any car that has been sitting for more than a few days.


1

You really aren't going to "upgrade" to higher quality brake rotors, unless you spring for some carbon fiber ones, but those are pretty much for performance and race cars. For average every day use, you can buy the cheaper rotors and have no worries about them. They will last for as long as you need them. As for your question, considering the cost of new ...


1

There exist a minimum for every kind of rotors. If this minimum is reached, you need to change your rotors, even if they look good and work well. Watch my video what could happen, if you don't change them here. If you are under the minimum, your rotor lost a lot of mass. They overheat more faster and produce structural damage. Breaks are the most important ...


1

Paul, I'd like you to open up those brakes again and examine the rotors very carefully. I just finished a conversation with a fella who described symptoms identical to yours. I walked him through a range of troubleshooting steps until finally I was nearly convinced that he had a cracked CV joint boot and he needed to replace an axle shaft when he suddenly ...


1

Will, you have DISK brakes, correct? And the calipers are off, so the park brake now has nothing at all to do with things, your rotors are just rusted onto the hubs. There are two things you can do, and you'll probably have to do both of them. First, find TWO ball-peen or similar hammers and a pair of protective glasses. Screw all the lug nuts on for ...


1

Did you back the emergency brake off, or maybe you have them on? If your e-brake is not at issue ... Spray the center section and the stud areas down with PB-Blaster or another very good rust penetrant. Let it sit for several hours. Then beat the heck out of it with a rubber mallet from the backside. What you are looking for is just a little movement on one ...


1

Brake pad and discs are a well practised bread and butter job. Your problem can only be because of: Wrong or defective parts, incorrect fitting damage such as not using a caliper piston retraction tool, incorrect re-assembly of shims and bolts and anti-rattle springs, previous damage or mis-alignment being masked by the old pad wear, a foreign body ...


1

I can't say for sure without a photo but in many cases it is rust on the hub. Many rotors have an extra hole machined in the rotor. It is usually located between two of the stud holes. I am not sure of why it is there, perhaps to help balance the rotor or to aid in the machining process. What can occur is that a small amount of rust will form on the hub ...


1

If your rotors' wear surfaces are still smooth & flat & true, then keep the rotors and replace the pads alone. The dealer wants to replace the rotors because doing so eliminates one potential source of liability for them - the more they replace, the less their potential liability. If the wear surfaces are NOT still good, then they should be measured ...


1

Replacing rotors or drums every other time you replace the pads/shoes is crazy. For most daily drivers, that would be every year or every 2 years. Unless the vehicle is being used for something like a delivery service (IE, LOTS of miles with TONS and TONS of stops), there is no reason not to expect 50K-100K or even more from a pair of even stock or ...


1

Because it's cheaper to produce. And that may not be so bad since it's cheaper for you as well, to maintain at least. They are also smaller in dia (not width necessarily) for the same braking force when compared to discs. This is due to the fact that the entire surface of the brake pads press against (and at) the circumference (in an axial direction). If ...



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