Hot answers tagged

11

I'm going to assume you have a very good reason for not taking the other car out of the garage to give yourself more room... People replace either the front or rear brakes together because they are "on the same axle" and replacing one side doesn't make sense because both sides should wear at the same rate. Replacing one side could make the car pull to one ...


10

The only way to know if a rotor needs to be replaced is measuring it with a micrometer and comparing that to the manufacturers specifications, so, no, we can't tell you if it needed to be replaced. However, since this was your first brake job I seriously doubt they needed to be replaced. Common practices is to "turn" rotors when doing a brake job. The ...


9

This is acceptable practice. Low quality brake pad backing plate edges can be very rough and the dimensions are often off spec. Higher quality pads usually have a better formed edge that fits correctly. As long as there are not rust flakes causing "rust jacking" under the pad end shims and the end shims are in good shape it is OK to file off the high spots ...


8

Overheated rotors can show some tell-tale signs. Once the metal has been overheated, it can weaken or warp which are both bad things. Some signs: Bluing Cracks These "spider cracks", "heat cracks", or "heat checks" are only on the surface of the rotor, but are still bad.


8

What is a freely spinning wheel? Of course, you should be able to spin the wheel by hand, but beneath the brake, bearing and transmission can apply lots of drag. My rear wheels do about 1.5 to 2 turns, my front wheels not more than half a turn when I put them in rotation by hand. While it's the same for the front wheel of my mother's car, its rear wheels ...


7

You cannot tell from just looking at them (in most cases) ... you have to measure the thickness of the rotor to see if they need replaced. Also, it's hard to tell from the picture how deep the wear is on the rotor. The grooves could be 1mm deep, or 5mm deep ... it's really hard to tell. It really comes down to how thick the rotors would be after machining. ...


6

To my mind, a wheel should spin freely when spun on the jack. A little noise is acceptable but if the wheel is clearly being slowed down excessively or is particularly hot after use, something is not right. As regards causes for brake drag, there do indeed include seized or sticking pistons but could also include sticky or corroded caliper slides (the pins,...


5

The huge size is not limited to carbon ceramic, that's just an attribute of most high performance cars' rotors. Carbon ceramic brakes are more expensive because the exotic compound does a much better job of dissipating heat than traditional steel rotors. Because they are able to dissipate heat faster, they do not get "soft" as quickly as other brakes. Soft ...


5

Most likely you need a new caliper. The pistons will stick and drag slightly when they're in need of overhaul/replacement. If any of the wheels are hot after driving, that's a very likely problem. You may or may not smell the classic "brake smell". If they're only sticking slightly, you won't notice the drag while driving, you'll just see the extra pad ...


5

The most common issue that makes a car shake when breaking is warped rotors. With warped rotors when you break the pad and caliper slide side to side causing the vibration. Depending on how badly they are warped the vibration may only be felt at high speed but the worse they are the lower the speed the vibration will be felt at. The best solution is to ...


4

Different types of discs are designed to either improve the performance, or improve the heat dissipation (preventing 'brake fade' which can occur if they get too hot) Plain solid discs - these are the most basic, as fitted to ordinary cars, they just have a solid block of steel. Perfectly functional for the vast majority of users. Vented discs - these are ...


4

What is passed off as a "warped rotor", and blamed on the user running through a puddle after heating the brakes, is a myth. The shimmy feeling that comes from brakes is usually due to uneven friction material build-up on the rotor. This transfer from pad to rotor is supposed to happen, indeed it makes the brakes work better, which is why brakes function ...


4

The easiest way to take care of this which I've found is to: Jack up and secure the vehicle (or wheel) Take all lug nuts off Sit on your butt in front of the offending wheel With your feet, pound alternately from one side to the other until the wheel comes loose This is a process, which can take some time. I've found this works the fastest in getting a ...


3

Squealing can be caused by a pattern of grooves in the rotor that make it look like an old vinyl record. The thickness of the rotor makes no difference on squealing, so even if there was plenty of meat left on the rotor it still needed servicing. Depending on how thick the rotors were you might have been able to machine them instead of replacing them - but ...


3

Provided that the other disc is still within acceptable tolerances with regards to width, you can replace a single disc. I personally prefer to replace discs as a pair on the basis that if one side is worn close to its useful life, the other is likely in a similar state. You could look at having the discs turned on a brake lathe as an alternative to ...


3

Types Drilled - commonly seen on motorcycles, the holes assist in cooling, weight reduction and allows water to be moved from the braking surface Grooved/slotted - aids in cooling and cleaning (allows air and dust to move from the inside of the disk to the outside) Drilled and Grooved - as above Vented - allow air in between the braking surfaces to aid in ...


3

The previous poster have great examples of rotors in need of replacement but I worked as a mechanic for years and rotors have become so cheap for most vehicles the easiest thing to do is replace them as paying someone to resurface often costs more on labor than buying new rotors. The most common symptom is shaking in the steering wheel when braking from high ...


3

3 ways: Drive the vehicle and do both light braking from 25mph then hard braking from 55mph, if the brake pedal pulses up and down or the steering wheel shakes or vibrates, then you have at least one warped rotor. If stops are smooth and relatively noise free then go to #2 below. Pull the rotors and do a visual inspection, look for cracks (even small ones) ...


3

All I can suggest it to soak the rim with a quality Rust Penetrate, squirt it into the lug nut holes with the lug nuts removed, do this several times a day over a few days, rotate the wheel 180 degrees each time right before you soak it, let the penetrate do the work. Once it has soaked a couple of days, get someone with a big foot and large leg to kick the ...


3

This is my method of last resort when lube, heat, brute force failed. Loosen all the lug nuts 2-3 turns, alternate between forward and reverse while accelerating 2 or 3 feet in each direction. Hit the brakes hard between each direction change. Have an observer watch for the wheel to move. Jack up the vehicle remove the lug nuts and try the methods that didn'...


2

This is not usual There is a reason this happens. When you put new brake pads on your motorcycle you have to depress the pistons in the calipers to make room for all of the new brake pad material you have on a new brake pad. When you depress the pistons in the calipers the buildup of the brake bad dust gets into the seal a bit. When you apply the brakes ...


2

I would bet the problem is not that the rotors are warped (this really doesn't happen all that often). The problem is probably that after hard braking and then a sudden stop without release for a period of time, there is a small buildup of brake friction material which has embedded itself upon the surface of the rotor. This gives you a pulsating feeling when ...


2

Yes, the front wheel should spin more freely than the rear, for as you note, there is less on it to drag. As Steve says, a non-flat rotor would result in oscillation or pulsing when braking, which should be pretty obvious on a bike. You can check it for flatness using a dial gauge (or run-out gauge). My suspects would be a sticking caliper, or a failing ...


2

I'm a retired mechanic, I used to work on private car's and some commercial vehicles. The principal of disc brakes is the same although details might differ between car and m/cycle. Don't even attempt any brake work unless you are competent and have the right tools. You mentioned the possibility of a distorted rotor. Can you feel anything untoward when ...


2

Exactly what @Movemorecommentslinktotop said in his comment ... if the rear rotors, there is a second braking surface inside the rotor "hat" which is for the e-brakes. If you haven't backed these shoes off or if you have the e-brake on, you'll never get these off. The front brakes may be rusted around the hub and are not releasing. They can become "space ...


2

What is passed off as a "warped rotor", and blamed on the user running through a puddle after heating the brakes, is a myth. The shimmy feeling that comes from brakes is usually due to uneven friction material build-up on the rotor. This transfer from pad to rotor is supposed to happen, indeed it makes the brakes work better, which is why brakes function ...


2

Sorry, but the rotors are the problem. It would seem like the edges of the holes stick up a tiny bit. The rotor is a much harder material than the brake pads. These edges dig out grooves in the brake pads so it can't contact the rotor at other points in the rotation and provide braking force/rust removal. Zoomed in ASCII art: Pad ---- < ...


2

If this is a vehicle that is driven regularly I would check that the rear brakes are working correctly. When things are working correctly the pads should remove the slight rust that forms. That is a lot of rust for a vehicle that is driven frequently. You can do a simple test by raising the rear wheels. While an assistant steps on the brakes see if you can ...


2

New brake pads should always be installed on smooth rotors. That includes either new rotors or having the old ones resurfaced. The rotors need measured. If there is enough meat on them to resurface, then do it. If they are too thin then get new ones.


2

The special tool you are requesting appears to be an allen drive. They can be procured online by doing a google search for "allen drive socket"



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