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12

I would recommend you get slotted, but not drilled rotors. Regular rotors will work fine for typical track use. What is more important is the type of brake pad you purchase to go with your disks. The reason I suggest not getting drilled rotors is, they have a tendency to crack at the holes due to stress risers. They will not last as long as you'd like them ...


8

Contact area Blank rotors have a larger area in contact with the pads than slotted or drilled rotors. Therefore they provide better braking at the same temperature. Cooling To cool the rotor, manufacturers use a vented rotor, not a cross-drilled or slotted rotor. cross-drilling puts holes perpendicular to the flow of air - they have no cooling effect ...


5

Paulster2 offers sound advice when he says the pads need to be replaced sooner rather than later. I recently took a picture when I performed a brake pad swap that offers a stark comparison of what you could be missing out on. The new pads for my BMW measured 10mm at the thickest part. The old pads were roughly 2mm, thin enough to cause my brake pad wear ...


5

2mm of friction material is not much. I would suggest you change the pads as they have. They may last a bit longer, but at what point are they going to go metal-on-metal and greatly reduce your stopping ability? At any point, the last little bit may flake off and cause this situation. It could run for 5000 miles or it could last 5 miles? Are you willing to ...


4

Not sure on a bike, but if this was a car I would tell you that the shop didn't burnish or set in the pads after the brake job, or failed to turn the rotors, or the rotors were turned improperly. Based on the number of miles you have driven without improvement I am leaning toward the rotors not being turned, or turned incorrectly. As Paulster2 pointed out ...


4

It very difficult to say if a rotor is warped by visual inspection. The tolerences involved are very small in the .004" range. That is about the thickness of 3 or 4 human hairs. My recent experience (if you are doing your own repairs) is to replace rather than resurface. The thickness of used and resurfaced rotors may exceed the minimum allowed thickness, ...


3

If the discs are fine, why resurface them? It is generally regarded as a bad thing to fit used pads to new/resurfaced discs, regardless of how much use the pads have - this is because the pads bed in to the shape of the disc, which will have slight grooves and ridges (especially at the edges), so you'll end up with a different shape after they've been ...


3

There should not be a screeching noise when you use the brakes. (I take it that you mean the screeching sound is when you drive the vehicle.) You will have to dismantle the brakes to the extent that you did to replace your rotors and pads. You must check that the rotors and discs are exactly the same size and profile as the ones replaced. Check any bolts ...


3

The brake hydraulic system might have an air bubble in the piping or cylinder unit. You may need to "bleed" the system by pumping the brake handle until firm, holding the handle down and opening the hydraulic nipple (liquid and air should spray out), then close the nipple and repeat if necessary. Remember that faulty brakes could cost you in the end so make ...


2

New disc brake pads should feel snappy and responsive. If the line is free of bubbles, and the rotor is free of grease, the next step is to check that the brake calipers are clean and slide smoothly, that the brake pedal is properly lubricated and not sticking, and that the master cylinder is sliding freely. Sometimes a shot of chain lube right into the ...


2

The mechanic is right and wrong. You may not have to replace them, but should at least have the rotors resurfaced, or turned. This restores the braking surface for the new pads to have compatible surface. Putting new pads on used rotors is not advised and will prematurely wear the pads. The caveat is if the rotors are too thin and can not be turned, they ...


2

Unless the rotor shows obvious signs of damage there is no way to tell by a photo. The only way to be sure is to measure the rotor with a micrometer. The most accurate method is with a micrometer specifically designed to measure rotors. The contact areas of the micrometer are pointed, this allows measurement at the base of any grooves. After the smallest ...


2

I found what was causing the noise. There is a small metal plate, roughly sized and shaped like a one of those little wooden ice cream spoons that come with a Dixie cup. It is positioned suspending from the bottom of the hub parallel to the back of the rotor. On both sides of the car it was touching the rotor causing the noise. On the driver side the ...


2

Just going out on a limb here...but when you're braking and you hit a bump, theoretically the tires lose complete contact with the road surface. That loss of friction between the road and the tire is whats hampering your stopping ability.


2

First of all, I would not drive it anymore until you get it sorted. Not having the ability to stop is pretty dangerous. Make your final trip one to the repair shop (Midas). Second, take it back to Midas and have them figure out what the issue is. If the problem started when they replaced the pads/rotors, it's probably something they did or didn't do. ...


2

This isn't unusual. I'd go as far as to say I'd be suspicious if I had a shop replace the front brake pads on my motorcycle and didn't hear them skimming the rotor a little. It's normal for the pads to touch the disc a little, and it's especially audible at low speed and after a fresh install. Now, that said, if the pads are indeed rubbing enough to slow ...


2

That isn't mostly rust buildup. That is the edge of the rotor that your pads don't touch. If it feels raised then that just shows you how worn your rotor is. You do not always need to replace rotors with pads, but it looks like you'll be replacing them next time at the latest. I once had a rotor split while driving home from 6 hours away. When it cracked ...


2

Your initial symptoms do indeed point to an issue with the brake rotors, but given that resurfacing did not address the issue, it is possible that you have an issue with uneven tire wear or wheels in need of balancing (that or they did a really lousy job of resurfacing the rotors). As to the brakes requiring more pedal effort after the service, this may be ...


1

If you look at this image, it appears the entire thing has to be pulled apart to get to it:


1

Blank rotors provide the best braking during regular operation. Slotted rotors are such because they improve performance during heavy and prolonged braking. If it were my car, I'd rather spend the money on high-heat racing pads and race-grade brake fluid (which boils at a much higher temperature). Other things to consider are steel braided hoses and ...


1

Rotor replacement is normally done when the rotor can no longer be resurfaced and still fall within the acceptable thickness range. The acceptable thickness range is based on stock brake pads though, so if you're using more aggressive aftermarket pads you may have to do replacement rotors sooner than is specified. That rust on the edge doesn't concern me ...


1

Where did you buy the rotors? They could have been sitting for a while. Sometimes when you buy rotors from a discount auto parts store it is a really good idea to have them shaved a little first. Especially the cheaper brands.


1

The groove could simply be a bit of dirt stuck there and I doubt it would generate the noise you describe (although getting rid of it is ideal). Based on the fact that the pads are thinner at the top than at the bottom and that the noise comes and goes seemingly at random my guess is that the corresponding calipers are getting stuck on their grooves for some ...


1

You have new brakes it takes time to them loose the original coating/surface. My have the same problem for a time but not lasted for this long. The grove is does noot sounds good. If they are not too deep you could go to a shop and they could make resurface it. Sometimes your disc soo thin that they could 'bend' because of the heat. Is this sound 'still' ...


1

Best bet replace you don't need to do a brake job twice. For about $60 for the both rotors and $18 for the pads you will come out ahead. Just make sure you break in the new pads. Don't use excessive braking or hard braking the first 200 miles and you should get at least 50000 miles of trouble free braking unless the calipers mess up.



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