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6

It is not normal for the front end to go out of alignment when getting the front rotors turned, but it would not be unheard of. Any time you mess with the front end of the vehicle you run the risk of needing an alignment. This is not something you should expect to be done, though. Something which may be happening is you may have a caliper which is ...


5

I was looking at this from an automobile standpoint wondering What the heck is he talking about?? The vast majority of vehicle rotors and drums are made out of grey cast iron!, then went back and reaslized you are asking about motorcycles and ATVs. To that end: Why are OEM parts made of martensitic stainless steel (AISI 4XXX series)? The main reason ...


4

Grey cast iron possesses some traits which makes it less desirable than martensitic steel for brake disc applications: it is more brittle, which means it is easier to crack it has very low impact resistance, making it less durable under heavy braking it has less hardness (400 Brinell vs 700 Brinell), so it wears more quickly if left uncoated, it is more ...


4

This appears to be a dust shield (or sometimes called a backing plate) for the rotor on the disk brake system. It would cover the back side of the rotor. You would be able to see it if you got under the car and looked at the rotor from the back side. I'm not positive about this, though, as this piece is pretty mangled.


4

This sounds a lot like the rear brakes are dragging. Basically, that means the brakes are always just slightly on, which causes the brakes to heat, and rapid pad wear. Note that hydraulic brakes will fail if they get too hot, due to brake fade, so this can become a serious problem. Checking for brake drag is very easy. Put the transmission in neutral, and ...


3

Types Drilled - commonly seen on motorcycles, the holes assist in cooling, weight reduction and allows water to be moved from the braking surface Grooved/slotted - aids in cooling and cleaning (allows air and dust to move from the inside of the disk to the outside) Drilled and Grooved - as above Vented - allow air in between the braking surfaces to aid in ...


3

Different types of discs are designed to either improve the performance, or improve the heat dissipation (preventing 'brake fade' which can occur if they get too hot) Plain solid discs - these are the most basic, as fitted to ordinary cars, they just have a solid block of steel. Perfectly functional for the vast majority of users. Vented discs - these are ...


3

This is a great question, so let me help. First, I am the owner an auto repair center in New Hampshire and rusted brake rotors are almost an everyday occurrence here. If you live in an area that uses a lot of salt on the roads in the winter, like we do, then this information most likely pertains to you. 99% of the rotors that we have to replace are due to ...


3

Brake wear does not always depend on mileage - for example a car used entirely in city stop-start traffic will wear out it's brakes quicker than one used entirely on highways, simply because the brakes are used a lot more per mile travelled. It seems to be quite an emotive subject, with some people saying you should replace the discs (rotors) every time you ...


2

WD-40 is not brake cleaner. I would take it apart and clean it with the appropriate stuff. Also can you move your caliper back and forth? It should be able to "float" or slide back and forth a little on the pins. If it's not moving, you could have a pad that's dragging and making constant contact (as well as noise) on the rotor.


2

If you want it to look nice/new/fresh/exciting, you will not be able to get it this way without removing the wheel. There is just no way of completely cleaning/coating the caliper without removing the wheel. Your best bet to get them cleaned up is to: Remove the wheel Pull the caliper from it's mount Remove the pads (keeping them in positional order for ...


2

One of the factors that influence the cost of replacement rotors is mass. Basically we are talking weight. Over the last couple of decades rotors have gotten cheaper and lighter. The rotor is lighter because it has less material. I buy the heaviest rotors I can get the specs on. This was actually part of a marketing campaign by NAPA several years ago. They ...


2

Where is the rust at? If it is on the outer edges and/or on the hat area (part in the center where the brake pad does not ride), there's probably absolutely nothing wrong with the brake rotor in the first place. As long as the wear area where the pad does it's business is clear, you have no issues. Only brake rotors which have been treated with some type of ...


2

I would bet the problem is not that the rotors are warped (this really doesn't happen all that often). The problem is probably that after hard braking and then a sudden stop without release for a period of time, there is a small buildup of brake friction material which has embedded itself upon the surface of the rotor. This gives you a pulsating feeling when ...


2

Yes, the front wheel should spin more freely than the rear, for as you note, there is less on it to drag. As Steve says, a non-flat rotor would result in oscillation or pulsing when braking, which should be pretty obvious on a bike. You can check it for flatness using a dial gauge (or run-out gauge). My suspects would be a sticking caliper, or a failing ...


2

I'm a retired mechanic, I used to work on private car's and some commercial vehicles. The principal of disc brakes is the same although details might differ between car and m/cycle. Don't even attempt any brake work unless you are competent and have the right tools. You mentioned the possibility of a distorted rotor. Can you feel anything untoward when ...


2

Exactly what @Movemorecommentslinktotop said in his comment ... if the rear rotors, there is a second braking surface inside the rotor "hat" which is for the e-brakes. If you haven't backed these shoes off or if you have the e-brake on, you'll never get these off. The front brakes may be rusted around the hub and are not releasing. They can become "space ...


1

Depends upon the type of vehicle . If you have a car where the brake assembly is independent of the wheels , you do not have an issue whatsoever. on the other hand if you have a motorbike which has the rotor(the disc) attached to the wheel , if you depress the brake , the pads will stick together preventing you from reinstalling the wheel back into the ...


1

Are you talking about just the wheel/tire, or are you suggesting removing any part of the braking system as well? If just the wheel/tire, there is no worry.


1

Turns out the culprit was ultimately the accident I had Christmas Eve. The C-Clip inside the differential holding the rear-passenger-side axle shaft broke during the accident and we hadn't known. This was what was causing the rotor to grind against the pads and caliper bracket. Thanks to all who helped trying to find the needle in the haystack. We were just ...


1

Was the wheel/hub spinning freely while the brakes were off? (to rule out other causes of noise) Are there any signs of things touching that shouldn't? (the stone-shield behind the brakes is a common culprit of this, as it can easily get bent slightly out of shape) When replacing them, were there any noticeable differences between the brakes/hub/etc on ...


1

If it's light enough that it'll scrape off with a toothbrush then it'll be scrubbed off by the pads the first time you use the brakes - i.e. don't worry about it. It's quite normal on any car that has been sitting for more than a few days.


1

You really aren't going to "upgrade" to higher quality brake rotors, unless you spring for some carbon fiber ones, but those are pretty much for performance and race cars. For average every day use, you can buy the cheaper rotors and have no worries about them. They will last for as long as you need them. As for your question, considering the cost of new ...


1

There exist a minimum for every kind of rotors. If this minimum is reached, you need to change your rotors, even if they look good and work well. Watch my video what could happen, if you don't change them here. If you are under the minimum, your rotor lost a lot of mass. They overheat more faster and produce structural damage. Breaks are the most important ...


1

Brake rotors do not "warp"; it is a myth. Surface irregularities can occur due to factors such as overheating and can be corrected by resurfacing the rotors on a lathe. It is unlikely that one or two resurfacing operations will affect thermal characteristics but the condition causing the vibration may reoccur within a short period of time. Without other ...


1

Because it's cheaper to produce. And that may not be so bad since it's cheaper for you as well, to maintain at least. They are also smaller in dia (not width necessarily) for the same braking force when compared to discs. This is due to the fact that the entire surface of the brake pads press against (and at) the circumference (in an axial direction). If ...


1

The direct answer is that you have to replace your rotors when they start looking like this:



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