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11

I would recommend you get slotted, but not drilled rotors. Regular rotors will work fine for typical track use. What is more important is the type of brake pad you purchase to go with your disks. The reason I suggest not getting drilled rotors is, they have a tendency to crack at the holes due to stress risers. They will not last as long as you'd like them ...


8

Contact area Blank rotors have a larger area in contact with the pads than slotted or drilled rotors. Therefore they provide better braking at the same temperature. Cooling To cool the rotor, manufacturers use a vented rotor, not a cross-drilled or slotted rotor. cross-drilling puts holes perpendicular to the flow of air - they have no cooling effect ...


8

Drum brakes are cheaper to manufacture than disc brakes, because there are fewer moving parts and because in the rear the parking brake (which often works by a drum-and-shoe mechanism even on four-wheel-disc-equipped cars) can share a drum with the "regular" brakes. All other things being equal, discs work better than drums, especially in wet conditions. ...


5

If your rotors are thick enough and there are no defects in pads area (big grooves, buldgy edges) I would not worry at all. There's no need to replace rotors each time. If there are some defects that can be removed and the rotors are thick enough - consider resurfacing the rotors, that might be cheaper. All-in-all, given that the only downside is faster ...


4

If your guide pins are stuck, the caliper won't be able to slide properly. With a sliding caliper, when you apply the brake, the piston pushes one pad against the disc (rotor), and simultaneously pushes back against the caliper (Newton's equal and opposite reactions), causing the caliper to slide along the guide pins, and pull the other pad against the ...


4

It very difficult to say if a rotor is warped by visual inspection. The tolerences involved are very small in the .004" range. That is about the thickness of 3 or 4 human hairs. My recent experience (if you are doing your own repairs) is to replace rather than resurface. The thickness of used and resurfaced rotors may exceed the minimum allowed thickness, ...


4

It's not required that you replace your brake rotors at the same time you replace your brake pads, but there are many reasons why it's highly recommended. Primarily, it's not the rust you should worry about, there most likely always going to be some rust around the edges, that's not at all out of the ordinary. The main problem is that your rotors are most ...


3

There should not be a screeching noise when you use the brakes. (I take it that you mean the screeching sound is when you drive the vehicle.) You will have to dismantle the brakes to the extent that you did to replace your rotors and pads. You must check that the rotors and discs are exactly the same size and profile as the ones replaced. Check any bolts ...


3

If the discs are fine, why resurface them? It is generally regarded as a bad thing to fit used pads to new/resurfaced discs, regardless of how much use the pads have - this is because the pads bed in to the shape of the disc, which will have slight grooves and ridges (especially at the edges), so you'll end up with a different shape after they've been ...


2

When replacing break pads it is incorrect and bad practice to simply push the piston back in, this will force brake back up into the master cylinder and sometimes even cause it to overflow. Just about everyone disregards this but it is very possible to damage the Master Cylinder this way. The "correct" way to do it is to open the bleeder screw, push the ...


2

With the brake piston fully compressed the pads should have a little clearance, enabling minor "play." When replacing brake pads it is important to make sure that the caliper itself moves freely in the horizontal direction (i.e., perpendicularly to the disc.) If not, one pad will wear quickly due to the fact that it will maintain pressure against the ...


2

Your initial symptoms do indeed point to an issue with the brake rotors, but given that resurfacing did not address the issue, it is possible that you have an issue with uneven tire wear or wheels in need of balancing (that or they did a really lousy job of resurfacing the rotors). As to the brakes requiring more pedal effort after the service, this may be ...


2

First of all, I would not drive it anymore until you get it sorted. Not having the ability to stop is pretty dangerous. Make your final trip one to the repair shop (Midas). Second, take it back to Midas and have them figure out what the issue is. If the problem started when they replaced the pads/rotors, it's probably something they did or didn't do. ...


2

This isn't unusual. I'd go as far as to say I'd be suspicious if I had a shop replace the front brake pads on my motorcycle and didn't hear them skimming the rotor a little. It's normal for the pads to touch the disc a little, and it's especially audible at low speed and after a fresh install. Now, that said, if the pads are indeed rubbing enough to slow ...


2

That isn't mostly rust buildup. That is the edge of the rotor that your pads don't touch. If it feels raised then that just shows you how worn your rotor is. You do not always need to replace rotors with pads, but it looks like you'll be replacing them next time at the latest. I once had a rotor split while driving home from 6 hours away. When it cracked ...


2

The rear brakes hardly contribute to stopping your car. They do between 20% and 30% of the work, so they can be cheap without compromising your safety or stopping distance. Mind you, drum brakes last much MUCH longer than discs. I have a Vauxhall Corsa B that has done 100k miles (160k kilometers) and the drums and shoes are still good for at least another ...


1

Blank rotors provide the best braking during regular operation. Slotted rotors are such because they improve performance during heavy and prolonged braking. If it were my car, I'd rather spend the money on high-heat racing pads and race-grade brake fluid (which boils at a much higher temperature). Other things to consider are steel braided hoses and ...


1

Rotor replacement is normally done when the rotor can no longer be resurfaced and still fall within the acceptable thickness range. The acceptable thickness range is based on stock brake pads though, so if you're using more aggressive aftermarket pads you may have to do replacement rotors sooner than is specified. That rust on the edge doesn't concern me ...


1

Best bet replace you don't need to do a brake job twice. For about $60 for the both rotors and $18 for the pads you will come out ahead. Just make sure you break in the new pads. Don't use excessive braking or hard braking the first 200 miles and you should get at least 50000 miles of trouble free braking unless the calipers mess up.


1

It looks like you have a warped brake rotor and/or brake pads. A warped rotor will grab the pads intermittently in the way you're trying to describe. In all likelihood replacing your brake rotor and brake pads will fix the issue. Be sure to replace both components, one or the other doesn't usually get you anywhere: ...


1

Besides being cheap to manufacture, lighter, being easier to use as a parking brake, and being of limited usefulness on a front engine car to begin with... Drum brakes also have the advantage of being "no drag". When they're off, they're completely off. Compare to disc brakes where there can still be a little bit of drag as there's no mechanism to pull ...


1

Can you feel or see deep grooves? Are your old pads irregularly worn? Have you already resurfaced the rotors? Do you feel shudder under braking? Are they close or under minimum thickness? Are they irregularly worn edge to edge? Some folks do replace rotors at each pad change, most shops will at least resurface at each change (replacing them every other time ...



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