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I was looking at this from an automobile standpoint wondering What the heck is he talking about?? The vast majority of vehicle rotors and drums are made out of grey cast iron!, then went back and reaslized you are asking about motorcycles and ATVs. To that end: Why are OEM parts made of martensitic stainless steel (AISI 4XXX series)? The main reason ...


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Grey cast iron possesses some traits which makes it less desirable than martensitic steel for brake disc applications: it is more brittle, which means it is easier to crack it has very low impact resistance, making it less durable under heavy braking it has less hardness (400 Brinell vs 700 Brinell), so it wears more quickly if left uncoated, it is more ...


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Exactly what @Movemorecommentslinktotop said in his comment ... if the rear rotors, there is a second braking surface inside the rotor "hat" which is for the e-brakes. If you haven't backed these shoes off or if you have the e-brake on, you'll never get these off. The front brakes may be rusted around the hub and are not releasing. They can become "space ...


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Depends upon the type of vehicle . If you have a car where the brake assembly is independent of the wheels , you do not have an issue whatsoever. on the other hand if you have a motorbike which has the rotor(the disc) attached to the wheel , if you depress the brake , the pads will stick together preventing you from reinstalling the wheel back into the ...


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Are you talking about just the wheel/tire, or are you suggesting removing any part of the braking system as well? If just the wheel/tire, there is no worry.


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Turns out the culprit was ultimately the accident I had Christmas Eve. The C-Clip inside the differential holding the rear-passenger-side axle shaft broke during the accident and we hadn't known. This was what was causing the rotor to grind against the pads and caliper bracket. Thanks to all who helped trying to find the needle in the haystack. We were just ...


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Brake rotors do not "warp"; it is a myth. Surface irregularities can occur due to factors such as overheating and can be corrected by resurfacing the rotors on a lathe. It is unlikely that one or two resurfacing operations will affect thermal characteristics but the condition causing the vibration may reoccur within a short period of time. Without other ...



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