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31

The decision to replace is largely based on the thickness. The repair manual should tell you the minimum thickness, below which you should replace the rotors when doing the repair. Use a pair of calipers and measure the rotor thickness, if you're below this number you need to replace the rotors. You may also wish to replace the rotors if you have ...


15

Cars falling off jackstands are no fun. If you're careful you can heat up the rotor with a torch prior to whacking it with a heavy mallet. If you're not careful, you run the risk of warping the rotor (which is ok if you're getting a new one). Don't try this near fuel lines or the gas tank.


12

I would recommend you get slotted, but not drilled rotors. Regular rotors will work fine for typical track use. What is more important is the type of brake pad you purchase to go with your disks. The reason I suggest not getting drilled rotors is, they have a tendency to crack at the holes due to stress risers. They will not last as long as you'd like them ...


11

There are three cases that cause brake rotors to need to be resurfaced/turned and/or replaced. Gouging of the rotor by the brake pad holding mechanism (the pad were rubbed completely away and the metal holding the pad start digging into the rotor) Warping of the rotor from extreme use (rotor gets too hot and warps upon cooling) The rotor itself wears down ...


11

The braking surfaces of a rotor require precision machining. The tolerances are in the .002" range. You would never come close without a quality lathe. Each manufacturer also has specifications for minimum total thickness, side to side variance for vented rotors, the smoothness of the finish and run-out which is the difference between the highest and lowest ...


9

You're going to have to bed the brakes in properly. Be very careful. http://www.zeckhausen.com/bedding_in_brakes.htm follow these instructions (at your own risk). A friend had a similar car as yours (IS300) and had the same problem. Once I bedded the rotors in, noise was minimized.


9

Wow, I'm in the minority here. It is my firm belief that you should have your rotors turned with every brake pad/shoe replacement! If you do not do this everything will work perfectly fine, until you apply the brakes then if your brake rotors/drums were glazed, heavily scored or worn out of parallel to the new brake pad your will stopping distance WILL be ...


9

Contact area Blank rotors have a larger area in contact with the pads than slotted or drilled rotors. Therefore they provide better braking at the same temperature. Cooling To cool the rotor, manufacturers use a vented rotor, not a cross-drilled or slotted rotor. cross-drilling puts holes perpendicular to the flow of air - they have no cooling effect ...


8

Improper wheel nut torque, use a torque wrench, or an impact wrench with torque sticks to put on the wheels. Rapid cooling such as running through water with the brakes hot is also suppose to cause it. Cheap pads, they breakdown under heat and leave deposits on the rotor surface. Ball joints should not cause the rotors to warp. Example of Torque sticks ...


8

No, it does not need to be done every time. Don't believe the hype. If you have warping, then you should re-surface, provided you have not worn beyond the minimum dimensions for your discs.


8

In a word, accuracy! A lathe as used by a mechanic will have the precision required, and the instrumentation available, to ensure the rotors are turned evenly. You'd be surprised at how much vibration you can get at 70mph from the smallest inconsistencies in rotor height - and how much you lose in stopping power!


8

Drum brakes are cheaper to manufacture than disc brakes, because there are fewer moving parts and because in the rear the parking brake (which often works by a drum-and-shoe mechanism even on four-wheel-disc-equipped cars) can share a drum with the "regular" brakes. All other things being equal, discs work better than drums, especially in wet conditions. ...


6

In my experience when removing the old type of brake hubs you would need to hit quite hard without that hurting the bearings. You might try spraying the disc with WD-40 and let that soak in for a bit and then knocking it again with a hammer. You would wan't to spray mostly around the bolts that fasten the wheel since there is most likely some corosion there ...


6

Assuming there is not a screw holding it on (your experience with the other side tells you this), just give it a solid smack with a hammer. When I worked for Mercedes, it was not uncommon to need a 2-lb sledge to knock the disc loose. We would use two hands and swing really hard sometimes.. never heard of a messed up bearing from that. Of course, this ...


6

It's probably that the pads need bedding in as NoCarrier says. However, my sister-in-law once had her brakes start squealing even though there was plenty of pad left, and the problem ended up being a small stone that got stuck between the pad backing plate and the rotor, in front of the edge of the pad.


6

Paulster2 offers sound advice when he says the pads need to be replaced sooner rather than later. I recently took a picture when I performed a brake pad swap that offers a stark comparison of what you could be missing out on. The new pads for my BMW measured 10mm at the thickest part. The old pads were roughly 2mm, thin enough to cause my brake pad wear ...


5

What you're describing sounds unusual. In an ideal situation, when you brake, even if you lock up the tires, you're going to continue moving in the same direction unless some outside force acts upon the car. To spin a car 180 degrees requires a mechanical malfunction, or an outside force. Start with the tires: are they the same on all 4 corners, and ...


5

If your rotors are thick enough and there are no defects in pads area (big grooves, buldgy edges) I would not worry at all. There's no need to replace rotors each time. If there are some defects that can be removed and the rotors are thick enough - consider resurfacing the rotors, that might be cheaper. All-in-all, given that the only downside is faster ...


5

2mm of friction material is not much. I would suggest you change the pads as they have. They may last a bit longer, but at what point are they going to go metal-on-metal and greatly reduce your stopping ability? At any point, the last little bit may flake off and cause this situation. It could run for 5000 miles or it could last 5 miles? Are you willing to ...


4

You could try applying anti-seize lubricant to the backs of the brake pads. Also consider lubricating other places where the brake pad backing plate could rub against the caliper. Just make sure to keep it off the braking surfaces. This has the side benefit of preventing the pads from rusting onto the caliper, making future maintenance easier. I typically ...


4

The main reason for reoccurring warping seems to be (form what I've read) "imprinting" your pads on the rotors: fully applying the brake on a very hot rotor for an extended period of time (a few seconds), thus leaving behind a deposit film that causes the warping problems. Maybe your pad is dragging on the forward rotor, causing it to heat up? With the way ...


4

As already stated, get the estimate on paper with parts and labor broken down. Go to another shop and get an estimate, tell them reasons related to your car of why you want the estimate, not "i have this estimate, can you do better". If you've noticed vibration under heavy braking, noises or just reached the number of miles where you want them checked for ...


4

It's not required that you replace your brake rotors at the same time you replace your brake pads, but there are many reasons why it's highly recommended. Primarily, it's not the rust you should worry about, there most likely always going to be some rust around the edges, that's not at all out of the ordinary. The main problem is that your rotors are most ...


4

If your guide pins are stuck, the caliper won't be able to slide properly. With a sliding caliper, when you apply the brake, the piston pushes one pad against the disc (rotor), and simultaneously pushes back against the caliper (Newton's equal and opposite reactions), causing the caliper to slide along the guide pins, and pull the other pad against the ...


4

It very difficult to say if a rotor is warped by visual inspection. The tolerences involved are very small in the .004" range. That is about the thickness of 3 or 4 human hairs. My recent experience (if you are doing your own repairs) is to replace rather than resurface. The thickness of used and resurfaced rotors may exceed the minimum allowed thickness, ...


4

Not sure on a bike, but if this was a car I would tell you that the shop didn't burnish or set in the pads after the brake job, or failed to turn the rotors, or the rotors were turned improperly. Based on the number of miles you have driven without improvement I am leaning toward the rotors not being turned, or turned incorrectly. As Paulster2 pointed out ...


4

This appears to be a dust shield (or sometimes called a backing plate) for the rotor on the disk brake system. It would cover the back side of the rotor. You would be able to see it if you got under the car and looked at the rotor from the back side. I'm not positive about this, though, as this piece is pretty mangled.


3

To me it sounds like you need to get some practice in a safe location, preferably with a trained expert, at breaking. There are driver safety classes that you can take which will give you experience at braking at, but not over, the limit of adhesion, and vehicle dynamics such as weight transfer and spin prevention. In particular, you need to make it second ...


3

I don't know about your model but most discs I've encountered have a couple of threaded holes in the hub part. They are often clogged with general road crud, so you may need to scrub the disc hub down to find them. If yours have such holes get a couple of bolts to match and screw them in, as evenly as practical. This will push the disc off the axle.


3

If the rattle is like a shimmying in the steering column, it's probably a warped rotor. But if it really is a rattle, take a flashlight and poke around under that wheel to see if your cv boot is ripped or if you can see any damage to the joints leading to the wheel. It may also be helpful to have someone else hit the brakes while you look to see how they ...



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