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6

No, you can still have air trapped in the rear caliper/wheel cylinder. Removing the line could introduce air to the caliper or wheel cylinder. Unfortunately, this means you might end up replacing your rear calipers / wheel cylinders also. It has happened to me a number of times. Be sure to spray it with some good penetrating oil and use a 6 point socket.


5

Your procedure for bleeding is fine, except for the banjo bolt You can bleed a line at the banjo bolt but you can't bleed a caliper. You can get your stuck nipple off if you break the head by using a bolt extractor. If you use a bolt extractor and have to drill it out in any way you will NEED to disassemble the caliper to ensure it does not have any metal ...


4

Referencing the photo it appears the retaining clip is still in place. At the 12 o'clock position you will notice a square shaped tag. Lifting the tab away from the bracket pry the clip in the direction of the small hole that the tab sat in. Again referencing the photo this would be going up. With the amount of corrosion visible I would try to wire brush ...


4

Just need to replace the master cylinder, the booster should be fine. The piston in the master cylinder is bad and is leaking against the booster. That's the only place for the fluid to come out.


2

It's more likely that you (Cooked) the sender unit for the oil gauge. Making it read improperly. Heat can damage alot of things on a motor. Also most later model cars have a (Low) pressure safety threshold. (ie) if the oil sensor is cooked and does not register enough oil pressure at turn over' The car will never start. This is easy to see on a functioning ...


2

As @jzd commented, oil pressure should change with engine load. At idle, your oil pressure is at its lowest, when accelerating it will be at its highest and cruising it should steady out. Also ambient temperatures effect oil pressure depending on the weight of oil you are using. Here is an explanation I gave a club member on our forum of a similar ...


1

I had a similar problem with a Ford Taurus the problem finally was traced to the vehicle speed sensor after it failed completely.


1

You should be able to pull them out with your hands, if it's the kind I am thinking of (in the fuse box under the hood) there is no latch or anything else holding them in.


1

I had a similar problem on 2 vehicles, a 03 mustang and a 99 bonneville. When the car would come to a stop light the engine would idle too low and stall out. The problem (in both cases) was the mass air flow sensor. Its a piece of electronics that determines the amount of air to let in to the engine from the throttle based on inputs. You could test it by ...


1

You could try changing your fuel filter(s) and PCV valve if your car has one.



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