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5

They simply pop off. Gently pry them off, the spring holding it on the ball is internal. EDIT: (Adding some descriptive pics for Larry) Place a large flat tip screwdriver where the red arrow is at. In the image below, the green flat piece is the screwdriver. Place one side of it at the base of the post. Place the other at on the rod. Twist it as shown ...


4

Manufacturers do sometimes use epoxy resin (or something like that) to attach spoilers and fenders. Mostly because it doesn't require drilling, which is a weak spot where rust can start to form, but also to form a nice aerodynamic seal. But then, you can never trust a secondhand car dealer and it may be that they had stuck on a wing/fender that had come off. ...


3

I contacted the official Honda dealer in New Zealand. They confirmed that I need to replace the entire assembly, rather than just the arm alone. They are not the "pop out" variety. The cost is NZD305 EACH, rather expensive. I contacted a local mechanic who said the same thing: need to replace whole assembly. He got a second hand one for NZD92, plus NZD28 ...


3

I would believe most body shops will do the work with you bringing them the parts. I recently had to replace the bumper on my Mo-n-Law's car. I bought one online, took it to the body shop, they painted it, and I brought it home and installed it. They charged me a set price for getting it painted. There was no issue with them doing this. Since you said the ...


2

There a several moderately complex and variable issues in this question. It is impossible to adequately adress all the variables, but here are some key points. First there are almost no after market protectors for the rear of the most vehicles. There are some companion rear bumpers sold for "brush guard" type front bumpers. While heavier than stock ...


2

They definitely offer protection against light and moderate accidents. So if it's for city driving, I'd say go ahead and get one. Just remember that putting something on the front of your car won't make any sort of difference if you get rear-ended.


2

There is a certification program called the Certified Automotive Parts Association or CAPA. It not only covers body parts, but other parts as well. If you purchase a part which is CAPA Certified, you can be assured the parts will have the same fit and finish as original equipment manufacture (OEM) parts. This is from the CAPA website: The Certified ...


2

Buy the used parts. $4500 is almost the price of an entire car. If you want to save lots of money, do the paint prep work yourself. You'll need to watch an instructional video on doing it properly, but it's basically LOTS of sanding with various grades of sandpaper and possibly filling dents in with body-filler. It's a long and tedious job, but you'll feel ...


1

If they really are 'stuck on': Using a Dremal or other mini disc cutter, cut into the ball section of the strut until it will pry off easily. A regular event for some vehicles. Do not lever too hard with the gas strut or you will bend the vehicles bodywork.


1

I use a steel roo bar (kangaroo's endemic here) bolted to chassis using high tensile bolts incorporating sleeves in chassis rails so they don't compress.Same applies to rock sliders.At the end of the day the purpose is to protect your radiator so you can limp home.If putting a heavy steel bull/winch bar on a 4wd your front shocks/coils may need upgrading to ...


1

I straightened a chrome bumper that was pushed into the fender using a tree and a 3/8" tow chain. I hooked the chain on the bumper then put a wrap of chain around the tree. I backed up slowly on an asphalt driveway to limit tire spin. You have to pull a little past the ideal point as it will spring back some when the tension is released. It wasn't perfect ...



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