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5

They simply pop off. Gently pry them off, the spring holding it on the ball is internal. EDIT: (Adding some descriptive pics for Larry) Place a large flat tip screwdriver where the red arrow is at. In the image below, the green flat piece is the screwdriver. Place one side of it at the base of the post. Place the other at on the rod. Twist it as shown ...


3

I contacted the official Honda dealer in New Zealand. They confirmed that I need to replace the entire assembly, rather than just the arm alone. They are not the "pop out" variety. The cost is NZD305 EACH, rather expensive. I contacted a local mechanic who said the same thing: need to replace whole assembly. He got a second hand one for NZD92, plus NZD28 ...


2

There is a certification program called the Certified Automotive Parts Association or CAPA. It not only covers body parts, but other parts as well. If you purchase a part which is CAPA Certified, you can be assured the parts will have the same fit and finish as original equipment manufacture (OEM) parts. This is from the CAPA website: The Certified ...


2

Buy the used parts. $4500 is almost the price of an entire car. If you want to save lots of money, do the paint prep work yourself. You'll need to watch an instructional video on doing it properly, but it's basically LOTS of sanding with various grades of sandpaper and possibly filling dents in with body-filler. It's a long and tedious job, but you'll feel ...


2

You need to use a flexible body filler specifically intended for polyurethane bumpers. It looks like the filler you used has detached from the substrate due to flexing (which could be solely due to temperature and not impact). The filler you used was for small dent repair on non-flexible metal panels. Also, I don't know how big of an area you filled but the ...


2

Yeah you can add a flex agent if you think that's the case or you can make sure it's sanded rough and then do like 3 or 4 layers of paint. You could also sand it down further, and cover it with fiberglass or epoxy resin, then sand that and paint it.


1

If they really are 'stuck on': Using a Dremal or other mini disc cutter, cut into the ball section of the strut until it will pry off easily. A regular event for some vehicles. Do not lever too hard with the gas strut or you will bend the vehicles bodywork.


1

I use a steel roo bar (kangaroo's endemic here) bolted to chassis using high tensile bolts incorporating sleeves in chassis rails so they don't compress.Same applies to rock sliders.At the end of the day the purpose is to protect your radiator so you can limp home.If putting a heavy steel bull/winch bar on a 4wd your front shocks/coils may need upgrading to ...



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